Tricholoma

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Tricholoma
Tricholoma flavovirens.jpg
Tricholoma flavovirens
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Fungi
Division: Basidiomycota
Class: Agaricomycetes
Order: Agaricales
Family: Tricholomataceae
Genus: Tricholoma
Fries
Type species
Tricholoma equestre
(L.) P.Kumm.

Tricholoma is a genus of fungus that contains a large number of fairly fleshy white-spored gilled mushrooms which are found worldwide generally growing in woodlands. These are ectomycorrhizal fungi, existing in a symbiotic relationship with various species of coniferous or broad-leaved trees. The generic name derives from the Greek trichos (τριχος) meaning hair and loma (λωμα) meaning fringe or border,[1] although only a few species (such as T. vaccinum) have shaggy caps which fit this description.

Some well-known species are the East Asian Tricholoma matsutake, also known as "matsutake" or songi, and the North American species Tricholoma magnivelare, also known as "ponderosa mushroom", "American matsutake", or "Pine mushroom". Some are safe to eat, yet there are a few poisonous members, such as T. pardinum, T. tigrinum and T. equestre.

Many species originally described within Tricholoma have since been moved to other genera. These include the Wood blewit (Clitocybe nuda), previously Tricholoma nudum, blewit (Clitocybe saeva), previously Tricholoma personatum, and St George's mushroom (Calocybe gambosa) previously Tricholoma gambosum.

Species list[edit]

T. fulvum
T. lascivum
T. scalpuratum
T. sulphureum
T. terreum (or T. myomyces)

See also[edit]

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Nilson, Sven; Olle Persson (1977). Fungi of Northern Europe 2: Gill-Fungi. Penguin. p. 24. ISBN 0-14-063006-6. 
  • Marcel Bon : The Mushrooms and Toadstools of Britain and North-western Europe (Hodder & Stoughton 1987). ISBN 0-340-39935-X
  • Régis Courtecuisse, Bernard Duhem : Guide des champignons de France et d'Europe (Delachaux & Niestlé, 1994-2000). ISBN 2-603-00953-2