Trim Street, Bath

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Trim Street
Trim Street, Bath.JPG
Location Bath, Somerset, England
Coordinates 51°22′59″N 2°21′41″W / 51.38306°N 2.36139°W / 51.38306; -2.36139Coordinates: 51°22′59″N 2°21′41″W / 51.38306°N 2.36139°W / 51.38306; -2.36139
Built 18th century
Listed Building – Grade I
Official name: General Wolfe's House (Number 5)
Designated 12 June 1950[1]
Reference no. 443809
Listed Building – Grade II
Official name: Number 10
Designated 11 August 1972[2]
Reference no. 443849
Listed Building – Grade II
Official name: Number 11 to 14[3]
Designated 11 August 1972
Reference no. 443850
Listed Building – Grade II
Official name: Number 15 to 17
Designated 11 August 1972[4]
Reference no. 443851
Listed Building – Grade II
Official name: Numbers 6 and 7
Designated 12 June 1950[5]
Reference no. 443846
Trim Street, Bath is located in Somerset
Trim Street, Bath
Location of Trim Street in Somerset

Trim Street in Bath, Somerset, England is a historic street, built in 1707, of shops and houses, many of which are listed buildings. It was named after George Trim who owned the land.[6]

Number 5, which is also known as General Wolfe's house, is a 2-storey building with a parapet and rusticated quoins, built by Thomas Greenway. The doorway has Ionic pilasters and a tympanum decorated with the implements of war. General James Wolfe was staying in the house when William Pitt, the elder commanded him to lead an expedition to Quebec.[1][7][8]

Numbers 6 and 7 are 3-storey houses with a mansard roof,[5] as does number 8[9] and 9.[10]

Number 10 dates from the late 18th century. It has 3 storeys plus an attic and mansard roof. The doorway has Doric columns and a pediment.[2]

Numbers 11 to 13 form a block of 3- and 4-storey buildings now used as shops,[3] while the 4 storey block at number 15 to 17 is still residential.[4] Number 14 and number 9 are 3 storey residential buildings.

The Unitarian Church was built in 1795 by John Palmer. The apse was the added and interior altered in 1860.[11] In 1809 the antiquarian Joseph Hunter, took up the post of Minister at the Chapel,[12] there he met and married Mary Hayward,[13] with whom he would have six children.[14]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "General Wolfe's House". Images of England. English Heritage. Retrieved 2009-09-03. 
  2. ^ a b "Number 10". Images of England. English Heritage. Retrieved 2009-09-03. 
  3. ^ a b "Numbers 11 to 14". Images of England. English Heritage. Retrieved 2009-09-03. 
  4. ^ a b "Numbers 15 to 17". Images of England. English Heritage. Retrieved 2009-09-03. 
  5. ^ a b "Numbers 6 and 7". Images of England. English Heritage. Retrieved 2009-09-03. 
  6. ^ Haddon, John (1982). Portrait of Bath. London: Robert Hale. p. 61. ISBN 0-7091-9883-3. 
  7. ^ "General Wolfes house, Trim Street, Bath". Retrieved 2010-09-13. 
  8. ^ Greenwood, Charles (1977). Famous houses of the West Country. Bath: Kingsmead Press. pp. 91–92. ISBN 978-0-901571-87-8. 
  9. ^ "Number 8". Images of England. English Heritage. Retrieved 2009-09-03. 
  10. ^ "Number 9". Images of England. English Heritage. Retrieved 2009-09-03. 
  11. ^ "Unitarian Church". Images of England. English Heritage. Retrieved 2009-09-03. 
  12. ^ Odom, William (1926). "Hunter, Joseph, F.S.A.". Hallamshire Worthies. Sheffield: Northend. pp. 12–14. 
  13. ^ Hunter, Sylvester Joseph (1861). A brief memoir of the late Joseph Hunter, with a catalogue of his publications. John Edward Taylor. 
  14. ^ Manning, John Edmondson (1900). A History of Upper Chapel, Sheffield. Sheffield: The Independent Press. pp. 86–92. OCLC 19012007.