Trinculo (moon)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Trinculo
Discovery
Discovered by
Discovery date August 13, 2001[1][2] (confirmed in 2002[1][3])
Orbital characteristics
Mean orbit radius
8,504,000 km[4][5]
Eccentricity 0.2200[4][5]
749.24 d
Inclination 167° (to the ecliptic)[4]
Satellite of Uranus
Physical characteristics
Mean radius
9 km (estimate)[6]
~1,000 km2 (estimate)
Volume ~3,000 km3 (estimate)
Mass ~3.9×1015 kg (estimate)
Mean density
~1.3 g/cm3 (assumed)
?
?
Albedo 0.04 (assumed)[6]
Temperature ~65 K (estimate)

Trinculo (/ˈtrɪŋkjʊl/ TRING-kew-loh) is a retrograde irregular satellite of Uranus. It was discovered by a group of astronomers led by Holman, et al. on 13 August 2001, and given the temporary designation S/2001 U 1.[1][7]

Confirmed as Uranus XXI, it was named after the drunken jester Trinculo in William Shakespeare's play The Tempest.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Daniel W. E. Green (2002-09-30). "IAUC 7980: S/2001 U 1". IAU Circular. Retrieved 2011-01-08. 
  2. ^ Jennifer Blue (2008-10-16). "Planet and Satellite Names and Discoverers". Working Group for Planetary System Nomenclature (WGPSN). Retrieved 2008-12-19. 
  3. ^ Sheppard, Scott S. "New Satellites of Uranus Discovered in 2003". Institute for Astronomy at the University of Hawaii. Archived from the original on 5 May 2008. Retrieved 2008-12-19. 
  4. ^ a b c Sheppard, Jewitt & Kleyna 2005, p. 523, Table 3.
  5. ^ a b Jacobson, R.A. (2003) URA067 (2007-06-28). "Planetary Satellite Mean Orbital Parameters". JPL/NASA. Retrieved 2008-01-23. 
  6. ^ a b Sheppard, Jewitt & Kleyna 2005, p. 523, Table 3 ... ri (km) ... 9 ... i Radius of satellite assuming a geometric albedo of 0.04.
  7. ^ It is about 10km in diameter. Gladman, B. J.; Kavelaars, J. J.; Holman, M. J.; Petit, J.-M.; Scholl, H., Nicholson, P. D.; and Burns, J. A.; The Discovery of Uranus XIX, XX, and XXI, Icarus, 147 (2000), pp. 320–324
  • Sheppard, S. S.; Jewitt, D.; Kleyna, J. (2005). "An Ultradeep Survey for Irregular Satellites of Uranus: Limits to Completeness". The Astronomical Journal 129: 518. doi:10.1086/426329.  edit

External links[edit]