Trinity Evangelical Lutheran Church of Manhattan

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Trinity Lutheran Church
Trinity Lutheran W100th St cloudy jeh.jpg
2011
Trinity Evangelical Lutheran Church of Manhattan is located in New York City
Trinity Evangelical Lutheran Church of Manhattan
Location 164 W. 100th St.
Manhattan, New York City
Coordinates 40°47′46.25″N 73°58′5.26″W / 40.7961806°N 73.9681278°W / 40.7961806; -73.9681278Coordinates: 40°47′46.25″N 73°58′5.26″W / 40.7961806°N 73.9681278°W / 40.7961806; -73.9681278
Area Upper West Side
Built 1908
Architect George W. Conable
Architectural style Gothic Revival
Governing body Private
NRHP Reference # 09000722[1]
Added to NRHP September 16, 2009[1]
Not to be confused with Holy Trinity Lutheran Church on West 65th Street

Trinity Evangelical Lutheran Church of Manhattan is a Lutheran church located at 164 West 100th Street just east of Amsterdam Avenue, on the Upper West Side of Manhattan in New York City. It was founded in 1888[2] as the German Evangelical Lutheran Church to serve German immigrants moving into the Upper West Side. It initially held services in a storefront until money had been raised to buy land and build a sanctuary.[3]

The double-height brick and stone masonry church building was constructed in 1908, and was designed by George W. Conable in the Gothic Revival style.[4][5] In the 1950s, the building was slated for demolition as part of Robert Moses' urban renewal program, but the parish resisted and eventually, after 10 years, won the battle. It became the only structure within 32 acres (13 ha) in its neighborhood not to have been razed by Moses.[3] On September 26, 2009, the building was listed on the National Register of Historic Places.[1]

References[edit]

Notes
  1. ^ a b c "Announcements and actions on properties for the National Register of Historic Places". Weekly Listings. National Park Service. September 25, 2009. Retrieved January 28, 2010. 
  2. ^ Dunlap, David W. From Abyssinian to Zion. (2004) New York: Columbia University Press. ISBN 0-231-12543-7, p. 280
  3. ^ a b "History" on the Trinity Evangelical Lutheran Church website
  4. ^ Office for Metropolitan History, "Manhattan NB Database 1900-1986," (Accessed 25 Dec 2010).
  5. ^ Russiello, James R. A Sympathetic Planning Hierarchy for Redundant Churches: A Comparison of Continued Use and Reuse in Denmark, England and the United States of America (MSc Conservation of Historic Buildings, University of Bath, 2008), p. 78-79.

External links[edit]