Tripartism

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For the mode of government in France from 1944 to 1947, see tripartisme.

Tripartism refers to economic corporatism based on tripartite contracts of business, labour, and state affiliations within the economy.[1] Each is to act as a social partner to create economic policy through cooperation, consultation, negotiation, and compromise.[2] Tripartism is a common form in neo-corporatism.[3]

Tripartism became a popular form of economic policy during the economic crisis of the 1930s.[4] Tripartism was supported from a number of different political perspectives at this time: one was Catholic social teaching; fascism supported this for fascist unions but repressed communist and social democratic unions; and in democratic politics.[5] Tripartism is a prominent economic policy in Europe, particularly where Christian Democratic parties influenced by Catholic social teaching have held power; it is a core part of the economic systems in Scandinavia and the Benelux that were put in place by social democratic governments.[6]

International Labour Organization[edit]

The International Labour Organization is the only United Nations agency that is based on tripartism. It uses the discussions between the three groups in drafting of standards and conventions. Also for the implementation of ILO-standards in national law tripartite consulations on a national level are a requirement[7] for those countries party to the Tripartite Consultation (International Labour Standards) Convention, 1976.

The United States withdrew from the ILO in 1977, based partly on the claim that communist countries could not send authentically tripartite representation.[8][9]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Wiarda, Howard J. Corporatism and comparative politics. M.E. Sharpe, 1996. Pp. 22.
  2. ^ Wiarda, Howard J. Corporatism and comparative politics. M.E. Sharpe, 1996. Pp. 22.
  3. ^ Wiarda, Howard J. Corporatism and comparative politics. M.E. Sharpe, 1996. Pp. 22.
  4. ^ Hans Slomp. European politics into the twenty-first century: integration and division. Westport, Connecticut, USA: Praeger Publishers, 2000. Pp. 81
  5. ^ Hans Slomp. European politics into the twenty-first century: integration and division. Westport, Connecticut, USA: Praeger Publishers, 2000. Pp. 81
  6. ^ Hans Slomp. European politics into the twenty-first century: integration and division. Westport, Connecticut, USA: Praeger Publishers, 2000. Pp. 82.
  7. ^ "Tripartite consultation". International Labour Organization. Retrieved 26 February 2011. 
  8. ^ Standing, Guy (2008). "The ILO: An Agency for Globalization?". Development and Change 39 (3): 355–384. doi:10.1111/j.1467-7660.2008.00484.x. Retrieved 4 August 2012. 
  9. ^ Beigbeder, Yves (1979). "The United States’ Withdrawal from the International Labor Organization". Relations industrielles / Industrial Relations 34 (2): 223–240. doi:10.7202/028959ar.