Tromboncino (squash)

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Cucurbita moschata
'Tromboncino'
Cucurbita moschata 'Tromboncino'.jpg
Tromboncino summer squash, with blossoms
Species Cucurbita moschata
Cultivar Tromboncino
Origin Liguria, Italy

Tromboncino, also known as zucchetta, is a type of squash most often used as a summer squash. While nearly all summer squash are cultivars of Cucurbita pepo,[1] tromboncino is a cultivar of Cucurbita moschata.[1][2] Also unique is the vining growth habit,[1][3] similar to many winter squashes, but unlike most other summer squash.[1] It is more tolerant to some common summer squash pests, including squash vine borer,[2] squash bugs,[2] and powdery mildew, than the more common, bushy, C. pepo summer squash cultivars, though it is also slower to grow.[2] Color is usually pale green, fading to beige upon maturity,[1] and it is picked around one foot long for summer squash. It is an heirloom,[4] originally from Liguria,[5] and remains popular throughout Italy and abroad.[1][3] Tromboncino squash can be left to mature into a winter squash; such is often compared to a watery butternut squash. If left to ripen, the fruits can grow over three feet in length.[4]

Tromboncino is known by many common names,[1] including: zucchetta rampicante,[5] zucchino rampicante,[1] climbing zucchini, climbing crookneck,[3] trombolino d'albenga, trombetta and serpentine squash.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h "Zucchetta". Mount Vernon Northwestern Washington Research and Extension Center: Vegetable Research and Extension. Washington State University. Retrieved 10 May 2013. 
  2. ^ a b c d Pleasant, Barbara. "Summer Squash at a Glance". Mother Earth News. Retrieved 13 May 2013. 
  3. ^ a b c McLaughlin, Chris (2013). Vertical Vegetable Gardening: A Living Free Guide. USA: Penguin Group. p. 186. 
  4. ^ a b Cameron, C. W. "In Season: Tromboncino squash". The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Access Atlanta. Retrieved 13 May 2013. 
  5. ^ a b c Spurrier, Jeff. "Tromboncino squash: A fast grower that can throw some curves". The Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 13 May 2013.