Tropic hormone

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Tropic hormones are hormones that have other endocrine glands as their target. Most tropic hormones are produced and secreted by the anterior pituitary.[1] The hypothalamus secretes tropic hormones that target the anterior pituitary, and the thyroid gland secretes thyroxine, which targets the hypothalamus and therefore can be considered a tropic hormone.[2]

Tropic hormones from the anterior pituitary include:

The hypothalamus controls the release of hormones from the anterior pituitary by secreting a class of hypothalamic neurohormones called releasing and release-inhibiting hormones—which are released to the hypothalamo-hypophyseal portal system and act on the anterior pituitary.[8]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Purves, William K.; David Sadava, Gordon H. Orians, H. Craig Heller (2001). Life: The Science of Biology (6th ed.). Massachusetts: Sinauer Associates. p. 719. ISBN 0-7167-3873-2. 
  2. ^ Cambell, Neil A.; Jane B. Reece. Biology (6th ed.). Sinauer Associates. ISBN 0-321-27045-2. 
  3. ^ Purves et. al. p. 718.
  4. ^ Purves et. al. p. 718.
  5. ^ Purves et. al. p. 718.
  6. ^ Purves et. al. p. 718.
  7. ^ Cambell, Neil A.; Jane B. Reece. Biology (6th ed.). Sinauer Associates. ISBN 0-321-27045-2. 
  8. ^ Purves et. al. p. 720–721.