This is a good article. Click here for more information.

Tropical Storm Barry (2013)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Tropical Storm Barry
Tropical storm (SSHWS/NWS)
Barry Jun 20 2013 1720Z.jpg
Tropical Storm Barry following landfall
Formed June 17, 2013
Dissipated June 20, 2013
Highest winds 1-minute sustained: 45 mph (75 km/h)
Lowest pressure 1003 mbar (hPa); 29.62 inHg
Fatalities 5 total
Damage Minimal
Areas affected Central America, Mexico
Part of the 2013 Atlantic hurricane season

Tropical Storm Barry was a weak and short-lived tropical cyclone that brought heavy rains to parts of Central America and Mexico in June 2013. Barry originated from a tropical wave that developed in the southern Caribbean Sea. The wave tracked northwestward and began to develop in marginally favorable conditions. On June 17, the disturbance was upgraded to Tropical Depression Two by the National Hurricane Center. Due to its close proximity to land, the system failed to intensify before crossing the southern Yucatán Peninsula. The depression emerged over the Bay of Campeche late on June 18 and became increasingly organized. During the afternoon of June 19, data from Hurricane Hunters revealed the system had intensified into a tropical storm. The newly named Barry attained peak winds of 45 mph (75 km/h) before making landfall in Veracruz, Mexico on June 20. Once onshore, the storm quickly weakened and degenerated into a remnant low that night.

Areas from northern Nicaragua to South-Central Mexico experienced heavy rains from the storm, with notable flooding occurring in many areas. Swollen rivers displaced thousands in Veracruz and killed two people, while two others were killed by a river in Oaxaca. In El Salvador, one person was killed by flooding.

Meteorological history[edit]

Map plotting the track and intensity of the storm according to the Saffir–Simpson hurricane wind scale

On June 8, a tropical wave exited the west coast of Africa, moving quickly westward without development.[1] During the evening hours of June 15, the National Hurricane Center (NHC) began monitoring a large area of disturbed weather in association with a tropical wave over the southwestern Caribbean Sea.[2] That day, a low pressure area developed just north of Panama.[1] Drifting west-northwest, environmental conditions were expected to be favorable for organization,[3] but the system moved over eastern Nicaragua on June 16. Despite moving over land, the circulation and convection became better organized, and after it emerged over open waters, the system developed into Tropical Depression Two at 1200 UTC on June 17 about 25 mi (45 km) north-northwest of La Ceiba, Honduras.[1] Located about 60 mi (95 km) east of Monkey River Town, Belize,[4] the depression was not expected to undergo significant strengthening.[5] Failing to intensify, the depression made landfall in southern Belize near Big Creek late on June 17 with winds estimated at 35 mph (55 km/h).[1][6] Despite a waning structure, the NHC noted that if the system emerged into the Bay of Campeche, re-development and intensification was plausible.[7]

While traversing the southern Yucatán Peninsula, the system nearly degenerated into a remnant low during the afternoon of June 18; however, as it neared water, sufficient convection redeveloped to maintain the system as a tropical depression.[8] The circulation contracted over land and emerged into the warm waters of the Bay of Campeche that day.[1] The system became increasingly organized as it turned westward in response to a mid-level ridge over the northwestern Gulf of Mexico.[9] A Hurricane Hunter reconnaissance mission into the depression during the afternoon of June 19 revealed gale-force winds, prompting the NHC to upgrade and name the system Tropical Storm Barry.[10] Based on a reconnaissance flight and Dvorak estimates, it was estimated that Barry attained peak winds of 45 km/h (75 mph) late on June 19.[1] At 1115 UTC on June 20, Barry made landfall at Laguna La Mancha, just north of Veracruz, Mexico.[1][11] Hours after moving inland, Barry weakened to a tropical depression as it interacted with the high terrain of Mexico.[12] The center of circulation became increasingly ill defined, with the majority of convection located well away from the center.[13] Late on June 20, Barry dissipated over the Mexican state of Puebla.[1]

Preparations and impact[edit]

Satellite image of a large, disorganized mass of clouds near a landmass.
Tropical Depression Two over the Yucatán Peninsula on June 18.

Central America and Yucatán[edit]

The precursor to Barry produced significant rains in Nicaragua, causing flooding in 14 districts in the North Caribbean Coast Autonomous Region.[14] Heavy rains in Honduras, peaking at 4 in (100 mm) in La Ceiba,[15] resulted in floods that damaged 60 homes and affected 300 people.[16] Several landslides occurred in Iriona, blocking off roadways. A likely tornado struck the community of Limón, destroying 9 homes and damaging 91 more. Four people were injured when their home was lifted and dropped back down.[15] In southern Belize, an estimated 10 in (250 mm) of rain fell in 24 hours, causing several rivers to top their banks. In some areas, culverts were washed away. At least 54 people living along Hope Creek were relocated to shelters.[17] In El Salvador, six minors were swept away by a flooded creek; five were quickly rescued but one remains missing and is presumed killed. Two people were injured after being struck by lightning.[1][18] In the Mexican state of Yucatán, wind gusts to 48 mph (77 km/h) and heavy rains downed trees and power lines.[19] More than 26,000 residents temporarily lost hydroelectric power after lightning struck a power station and caused a fire.[20]

Eastern Mexico[edit]

As Tropical Depression Two emerged into the Bay of Campeche on June 18, the Government of Mexico issued a tropical storm watch for coastal areas between Punta El Lagarto and Barra Da Nautla.[21] The watch was upgraded to a tropical storm warning early on June 19.[22] Following the storm's intensification that day, the warning was expanded northward to Tuxpan.[23] Officials dispatched 34,250 workers to set up refugee camps throughout the state.[24] Across Veracruz, approximately 2,000 people sought refuge in shelters.[25]

Heavy rains in Veracruz, peaking at 14.6 in (370 mm) in Misantla,[26] brought more than a dozen rivers to critical levels and triggered flash floods that killed two people.[25][27] As a precautionary measure, officials urged 4,000 residents along La Antigua River to evacuate.[25] Several landslides occurred in the states of Guerrero and Puebla.[28][29] Two people were swept away by a river in Oaxaca.[1]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Stacy Stewart (October 7, 2013). Tropical Storm Barry Tropical Cyclone Report (PDF) (Report). National Hurricane Center. Retrieved December 11, 2013. 
  2. ^ Eric Blake (June 15, 2013). "Graphical Tropical Weather Outlook". National Hurricane Center. Retrieved June 19, 2013. 
  3. ^ Richard Pasch (June 16, 2013). "Graphical Tropical Weather Outlook". National Hurricane Center. Retrieved June 19, 2013. 
  4. ^ Richard Pasch (June 17, 2013). Tropical Depression Two Public Advisory Number 1. National Hurricane Center (Report) (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration). Retrieved June 17, 2013. 
  5. ^ Richard Pasch (June 17, 2013). Tropical Depression Two Discussion Number 1. National Hurricane Center (Report) (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration). Retrieved June 21, 2013. 
  6. ^ Christopher W. Landsea (June 17, 2013). Tropical Depression Two Discussion Number 3. National Hurricane Center (Report) (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration). Retrieved June 21, 2013. 
  7. ^ Lixion Avila (June 17, 2013). Tropical Depression Two Discussion Number 5. National Hurricane Center (Report) (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration). Retrieved June 18, 2013. 
  8. ^ Lixion Avila (June 18, 2013). Tropical Depression Two Discussion Number 6. National Hurricane Center (Report) (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration). Retrieved June 21, 2013. 
  9. ^ Richard Pasch (June 19, 2013). Tropical Depression Two Discussion Number 8. National Hurricane Center (Report) (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration). Retrieved June 21, 2013. 
  10. ^ Lixion Avila (June 19, 2013). Tropical Storm Barry Tropical Cyclone Update. National Hurricane Center (Report) (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration). Retrieved June 19, 2013. 
  11. ^ Lixion Avila (June 20, 2013). Tropical Storm Barry Discussion Number 13. National Hurricane Center (Report) (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration). Retrieved June 20, 2013. 
  12. ^ Lixion Avila (June 20, 2013). Tropical Depression Barry Discussion Number 14. National Hurricane Center (Report) (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration). Retrieved June 21, 2013. 
  13. ^ Jack L. Beven (June 20, 2013). Post-Tropical Cyclone Barry Discussion Number 15. National Hurricane Center (Report) (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration). Retrieved June 21, 2013. 
  14. ^ (Spanish) "Nicaragua mantiene vigilancia por sismos y depresión tropical". Nuestra Tele Noticias 24. June 17, 2013. Retrieved June 21, 2013. 
  15. ^ a b (Spanish) "Tornado "envolvió" casas en Limón, Colón". MR/RMP. La Tribuna. June 18, 2013. Retrieved June 21, 2013. 
  16. ^ (Spanish) "Mantienen alerta de precaución por lluvias de depresión tropical en Honduras". EFE. Tegucigalpa, Honduras: La Prensa. June 18, 2013. Retrieved June 19, 2013. 
  17. ^ "Hope Creek Gets Flooded Again, This Time Residents Ready". 7NewsBelize. June 18, 2013. Retrieved June 19, 2013. 
  18. ^ (Spanish) "Lluvias arrastran a seis niños en El Salvador". San Salvador, El Salvador: Sipse Noticias. June 19, 2013. Retrieved June 20, 2013. 
  19. ^ (Spanish) "Depresión tropical tira árboles y postes en Yucatán". El Universal. Mérida, Yucatán: Vanguardia. June 18, 2013. Retrieved June 19, 2013. 
  20. ^ (Spanish) "Depresión tropical en Yucatán: Inundaciones, accidentes y caìda de árboles y postes. En Progreso impacta rayo a la CFE". Merida, Yucatán: Artículo 7. June 19, 2013. Retrieved June 20, 2013. 
  21. ^ Daniel Brown (June 18, 2013). Tropical Depression Two Public Advisory Number 7. National Hurricane Center (Report) (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration). Retrieved June 21, 2013. 
  22. ^ Richard Pasch (June 19, 2013). Tropical Depression Two Public Advisory Number 8. National Hurricane Center (Report) (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration). Retrieved June 21, 2013. 
  23. ^ Daniel Brown and Robbie Berg (June 19, 2013). Tropical Depression Two Public Advisory Number 10A. National Hurricane Center (Report) (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration). Retrieved June 21, 2013. 
  24. ^ (Spanish) "Evacuadas 1.200 personas en México por tormenta Barry". El Nuevo Siglo (Bogotá, Colombia). Agence France-Presse. 2013-06-20. Retrieved 2013-06-21. 
  25. ^ a b c (Spanish) "México: un muerto por la tormenta tropical Barry". La Voz Sucesos. June 21, 2013. Retrieved June 21, 2013. 
  26. ^ (Spanish) "Protección Civil atiende a 31 municipios afectados por ‘Barry’ en Veracruz". Excelsior. June 21, 2013. Retrieved December 15, 2013. 
  27. ^ (Spanish) "Barry se degrada a tormenta tropical; deja dos muertos en Veracruz". Animal Politico. June 21, 2013. Retrieved June 23, 2013. 
  28. ^ (Spanish) Constantino González Vargas (June 20, 2013). "Reporta Protección Civil deslaves en Guerrero a causa de Barry". NotiMex. SDP Noticias. Retrieved June 21, 2013. 
  29. ^ (Spanish) Fernando Jimenez (June 20, 2013). "Tormenta 'Barry' genera fuertes lluvias en sureste de México". 24 Horas. Retrieved June 21, 2013. 

External links[edit]