True Men Don't Kill Coyotes

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
"True Men Don't Kill Coyotes"
Song by Red Hot Chili Peppers
Released August 10, 1984
Format music video
Recorded April 1984
Genre Funk rock
Length 3:40
Label EMI
Writer Kiedis, Flea, Sherman, Martinez
Producer Andy Gill

"True Men Don't Kill Coyotes" is the first track from the eponymous 1984 debut album of The Red Hot Chili Peppers. It was the first music video the band ever released although the song was never released as a proper single for radio airplay, it still received some national airplay at the time. The following single, "Get Up and Jump" was the first to be released as a radio only single.

Background[edit]

This song was written by Anthony Kiedis, Flea, Jack Sherman and Cliff Martinez, rather than the original line-up (Anthony and Flea with Hillel Slovak and Jack Irons) which wrote quite a few of the songs on the first and even second album.

It was included on the band's What Hits!? collection on CD and DVD.

True Men Don't Kill Coyotes has been performed just once since 1987 (on the band's 1989 Mother's Milk tour) although on their 2011 I'm with You Tour Flea teased fans by playing the intro; however, he did not play the entire song.

Music video[edit]

A video was made for "True Men Don't Kill Coyotes" and it helped to build the band's growing fan base.

The clip, which received moderate MTV rotation, used a lot of fluorescent colours, and showed the band playing the song on a cartoonish desert-like scenario. In the beginning of the video, a weird farmer character pours a radioactive-labeled liquid substance into a patch of desert in front of a crudely assembled Hollywood Sign. From this, the entire band bursts from the ground and start to perform the song. The video was directed by Graeme Whifler, who gained notoriety for directing music videos for bands such as The Residents, Renaldo and the Loaf, Yello, Tuxedomoon, Mx-80 Sound, Snakefinger and many other artists on the Ralph Records label.

Musicians[edit]

References[edit]