Truxtun-class destroyer

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USS Truxtun
USS Truxtun (DD-14)
Class overview
Name: Truxtun class destroyer
Builders: Maryland Steel Company
Operators:  United States Navy
Preceded by: Bainbridge-class destroyer
Succeeded by: Smith-class destroyer
Built: 1902
In commission: 1902-20
Completed: 3
Retired: 3
Preserved: 0
General characteristics
Type: Destroyer
Displacement: 433 long tons (440 t) normal
605 long tons (615 t) full load
Length: 259 ft 6 in (79.10 m)
Beam: 22 ft 3 in (6.78 m)
Draft: 6 ft (1.8 m)
Propulsion: 4 coal-fired boilers
2 triple-expansion engines
8,300 ihp (6,189 kW)
2 screws
Speed: 29.6 knots (54.8 km/h; 34.1 mph)
Capacity: 175 tons coal (fuel)
Complement: 3 Officers
75 Enlisted
Armament: Two 3 inch/50 caliber (76 mm) guns
Six 6 pounder (57 mm) guns
Two 18 inch (457 mm) torpedo tubes

Three Truxtun-class destroyers served in the United States Navy. Part of the original 16 destroyers authorized by Congress in 1898, they were commissioned in 1902.[1] They were very similar to their Bainbridge-class contemporaries, except for mounting six 6 pounder (57 mm) guns instead of five. They were considered the most successful of the first 16 US Navy destroyers, and were the basis for the larger succeeding Smith-class.[2]

The Truxtuns escorted convoys during World War I. They may have been equipped with one or two depth charge racks for this mission.[3] All were sold in 1920 and converted to merchant vessels or scrapped.

Ships in class[edit]

The three ships of the Truxtun class were:[4]

Ship Shipyard Laid down Launched Commissioned Decommissioned Fate
USS Truxtun (DD-14) Maryland Steel Company 13 November 1899 15 August 1901 11 September 1902 18 July 1919 Sold to Joseph G. Hitner for merchant conversion
USS Whipple (DD-15) Maryland Steel Company 13 November 1899 15 August 1901 17 February 1903 7 July 1919 Sold to Joseph G. Hitner for scrapping
USS Worden (DD-16) Maryland Steel Company 13 November 1899 15 August 1901 17 March 1903 13 July 1919 Sold to Joseph G. Hitner for merchant conversion

See also[edit]

Media related to Truxtun class destroyers at Wikimedia Commons

References[edit]

  1. ^ Friedman, p. 10-19
  2. ^ Friedman, p. 17
  3. ^ Friedman, p. 68
  4. ^ http://destroyerhistory.org/early/truxtunclass/ DestroyerHistory.org Truxtun class destroyer
  • Friedman, Norman "US Destroyers: An Illustrated Design History (Revised Edition)", Naval Institute Press, Annapolis:2004, ISBN 1-55750-442-3.
  • Gardiner, Robert, Conway's all the world's fighting ships 1860-1905 Conway Maritime Press, 1997. ISBN 0-85177-133-5

External links[edit]