Tu Vuò Fà L'Americano

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"Tu vuò fà l'americano"
Song by Renato Carosone
Released 1956
Recorded 1956
Genre Swing, jazz
Writer Renato Carosone

"Tu vuò fà l'americano" ("You Want to Be American")[1] is a Neapolitan language song by Italian singer Renato Carosone.

Carosone wrote the song in collaboration with Nicola "Nisa" Salerno in 1956. Combining swing and jazz, it became one of his best-known songs.[2] Commissioned by Ricordi director Rapetti for a radio contest, the music was composed by Carosone in a very short time after reading Nisa's lyrics; he immediately believed the song would become a great success.

Carosone's original version of the song was performed by him in the film Totò, Peppino e le fanatiche (directed by Mario Mattoli, 1958). The song was featured in the 1960 Melville Shavelson film It Started in Naples, in which it was sung by Sophia Loren. It was also performed by Rosario Fiorello in the 1999 film The Talented Mr. Ripley.[2]

The lyrics[2] are about an Italian who imitates the contemporary American lifestyle and acts like a Yankee, drinking whisky and soda, dancing to rock 'n roll, playing baseball and smoking Camel cigarettes, but who still depends on his parents for money.[2] The song is generally considered to be a satire on the process of Americanization that occurred in the early post-war years, when southern Italy was still a rural, traditional society.[3]

According to the Italian newspaper La Repubblica, "Tu vuò fa l'americano" is the definitive hit single of Carosone's artistic career, as he retired from music in 1960, just four years after releasing the song.[4]

Covers and sampling[edit]

Uses in popular culture[edit]

  • Matt Damon, Jude Law and Rosario Fiorello sing the song in a jazz club in The Talented Mr. Ripley. In a subversion of the subject of the song, Law's character is a spoiled American heir living in Mongibello, Italy, where he revels in the Italian culture while living off a generous allowance from his wealthy American parents back home.
  • Carosone's version appears on the soundtrack for the movie The American, 2010. In the movie, the song plays in a cafe visited by George Clooney's character, an American assassin seeking refuge in a small Italian town.
  • The same version is part of the soundtrack for the animated movie Sammy's Great Escape, 2012.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]