Tuckerton, New Jersey

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Tuckerton, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of Tuckerton
Map of Tuckerton in Ocean County. Inset: Location of Ocean County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Map of Tuckerton in Ocean County. Inset: Location of Ocean County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Tuckerton, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Tuckerton, New Jersey
Coordinates: 39°35′31″N 74°20′01″W / 39.592075°N 74.333511°W / 39.592075; -74.333511Coordinates: 39°35′31″N 74°20′01″W / 39.592075°N 74.333511°W / 39.592075; -74.333511[1][2]
Country United States
State New Jersey
County Ocean
Incorporated February 18, 1901
Named for Ebenezer Tucker
Government[5]
 • Type Borough
 • Mayor George "Buck" Evans (term ends December 31, 2014)[3]
 • Administrator Jenny Gleghorn[4]
 • Clerk Grace Di Elmo[4]
Area[1]
 • Total 3.804 sq mi (9.851 km2)
 • Land 3.364 sq mi (8.712 km2)
 • Water 0.440 sq mi (1.139 km2)  11.56%
Area rank 304th of 566 in state
16th of 33 in county[1]
Elevation [6] 0 ft (0 m)
Population (2010 Census)[7][8][9][10]
 • Total 3,347
 • Estimate (2012[11]) 3,365
 • Rank 437th of 566 in state
17th of 33 in county[12]
 • Density 995.1/sq mi (384.2/km2)
 • Density rank 382nd of 566 in state
19th of 33 in county[12]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 08087[13][14]
Area code(s) 609 Exchanges: 294, 296, 812[15]
FIPS code 3402974210[1][16][17]
GNIS feature ID 885422[1][18]
Website www.tuckertonborough.com

Tuckerton is a borough in Ocean County, New Jersey, named for founder Ebenezer Tucker (1758–1845), and was a port of entry, but not the third Port of Entry as commonly believed, in the United States[19] As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 3,347,[8][9][10] reflecting a decline of 170 (-4.8%) from the 3,517 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 469 (+15.4%) from the 3,048 counted in the 1990 Census.[20]

Tuckerton was incorporated as a borough by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on February 18, 1901, from portions of Little Egg Harbor Township.[21]

The borough is surrounded by Little Egg Harbor Township, but is politically independent. Because Tuckerton and Little Egg Harbor share the same 08087 ZIP code and Little Egg Harbor has no true "downtown" area, many refer to Little Egg Harbor and surrounding suburbs as "Tuckerton".

Tuckerton is home to the Tuckerton Seaport, a working maritime museum and village.

History[edit]

The intersection of U.S. Route 9 and CR 539 seen in Winter 2005

The area that is now Tuckerton was settled in 1698.[22] Some of the early settlers were Andrews, Falkinburgs, Shourds, Ongs, Willets[23] and Osborns. Edward Andrews settled on the east side of the Pohatcong Creek; his brother, Mordecia Andrews settled on the west side of the same creek. Edward, tired of going to Mount Holly Township with his grain, constructed a cedar log grist mill on the site of a dam built by beavers at the mouth of what is known as Tuckerton Creek.[24] He built the grist mill in 1704, and it still stands to this day.

Tuckerton became a Port of Entry of the United States, but not the third port as is commonly believed, with Ebenezer Tucker appointed Collector, his commission bearing the date March 21, 1791 signed by George Washington and Thomas Jefferson. It was six years later that Tuckerton became a post town with Reuben Tucker as its first postmaster.

Former names of the town included "Andrew Mills", "Middle-of-the-Shore", "Clamtown", "Quakertown", and "Fishtown". In March 1789, Ebenezer Tucker hosted a feast at the then-named Clamtown for the residents at which time they officially changed the name to Tuckerton.[25]

In 1816, Isaac Jenkins established the first stage line between Tuckerton and Philadelphia, making one trip a week, each trip taking two days travel each way. John D. Thompson, Esq., bought the line in 1828 and ran the stages each way in a day and carried the mail. The stages and vessels were the only public conveyances to the cities until 1871 when the Tuckerton Railroad was built.

What was probably New Jersey's first summer resort was on Tucker's Island off shore from Little Egg Harbor. The island sported boarding houses, private cottages, and a school. In 1848 a Lighthouse was erected there, with Eben Rider as its first light keeper. In 1869 the Little Egg Harbor Lifesaving's Station was constructed there. Also known as Sea Haven, the island contained two hotels. The island was wiped away in a storm, including its majestic lighthouse, which fell into the sea. At the Tuckerton Seaport Museum a re-created lighthouse has been built as well as other re-created buildings that were on Tuckers Island. In the lighthouse there are several wall mounted pictures preserving the instant that the original lighthouse fell into the sea. The original island remains under water.

The area surrounding present-day Tuckerton was part of Burlington County until 1891 when it joined with Ocean County. Tuckerton was established in March 1901[21] with its first Mayor being Frank R. Austin.

Tuckerton received extensive damage after Superstorm Sandy struck the boro on October 28, 2012. Almost 300 homes suffered extensive damage, while 32 homes were completely destroyed. Floodwaters also ravaged businesses along South green Street as well as flooding some buildings in the Tuckerton Seaport.[26]

Geography[edit]

Tuckerton is located at 39°35′31″N 74°20′01″W / 39.592075°N 74.333511°W / 39.592075; -74.333511 (39.592075,-74.333511). According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 3.804 square miles (9.851 km2), of which 3.364 square miles (8.712 km2) is land and 0.440 square miles (1.139 km2) (11.56%) is water.[1][2]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1910 1,268
1920 1,106 −12.8%
1930 1,429 29.2%
1940 1,320 −7.6%
1950 1,332 0.9%
1960 1,536 15.3%
1970 1,926 25.4%
1980 2,472 28.3%
1990 3,048 23.3%
2000 3,517 15.4%
2010 3,347 −4.8%
Est. 2012 3,365 [11] 0.5%
Population sources: 1910-2000[27]
1910-1920[28] 1910[29] 1910-1930[30]
1930-1990[31] 2000[32][33] 2010[7][8][9][10]

Census 2010[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 3,347 people, 1,396 households, and 872.5 families residing in the borough. The population density was 995.1 per square mile (384.2 /km2). There were 1,902 housing units at an average density of 565.5 per square mile (218.3 /km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 93.79% (3,139) White, 0.75% (25) Black or African American, 0.09% (3) Native American, 1.05% (35) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 2.06% (69) from other races, and 2.27% (76) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 6.07% (203) of the population.[8]

There were 1,396 households, of which 24.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 45.8% were married couples living together, 11.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 37.5% were non-families. 31.1% of all households were made up of individuals, and 15.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.39 and the average family size was 2.99.[8]

In the borough, 21.2% of the population were under the age of 18, 8.0% from 18 to 24, 23.9% from 25 to 44, 29.4% from 45 to 64, and 17.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 42.5 years. For every 100 females there were 99.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 93.1 males.[8]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $53,209 (with a margin of error of +/- $5,943) and the median family income was $61,677 (+/- $10,244). Males had a median income of $50,139 (+/- $5,122) versus $43,963 (+/- $14,203) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $24,974 (+/- $3,410). About 6.7% of families and 10.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 20.8% of those under age 18 and 9.2% of those age 65 or over.[34]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[16] there were 3,517 people, 1,477 households, and 921 families residing in the borough. The population density was 961.7 people per square mile (371.0/km2). There were 1,971 housing units at an average density of 539.0 per square mile (207.9/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 96.90% White, 0.40% African American, 0.28% Native American, 0.54% Asian, 0.54% from other races, and 1.34% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.10% of the population.[32][33]

There were 1,477 households out of which 28.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 50.0% were married couples living together, 8.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 37.6% were non-families. 31.6% of all households were made up of individuals and 15.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.38 and the average family size was 3.02.[32][33]

In the borough the population was spread out with 23.0% under the age of 18, 8.0% from 18 to 24, 29.1% from 25 to 44, 23.0% from 45 to 64, and 16.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females there were 98.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 94.1 males.[32][33]

The median income for a household in the borough was $40,042, and the median income for a family was $49,528. Males had a median income of $35,799 versus $30,583 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $20,118. About 5.9% of families and 7.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 13.7% of those under age 18 and 10.2% of those age 65 or over.[32][33]

Government[edit]

The Tuckerton Seaport and Lake Pohatcong

Local government[edit]

Tuckerton is governed under the Borough form of New Jersey municipal government. The government consists of a Mayor and a Borough Council comprising six council members, with all positions elected on an at-large basis. A Mayor is elected directly by the voters to a four-year term of office. The Borough Council consists of six members elected to serve three-year terms on a staggered basis, with two seats coming up for election each year.[5]

As of 2013, the Mayor of the Borough of Tuckerton is George "Buck" Evans (R; term ends December 31, 2014). Members of the Borough Council (with party, term-end year and committee chairmanship in parentheses) are Council President James R. Edwards (R, 2014; Public Works/Water and Sewer), Anthony I. Foglia (R, 2013; Police and Law Enforcement), Susan R. Marshall (R, 2013; Community Affairs), Doris F. Mathisen (R, 2015; Administration, Regulations and Legislation), John Schwartz (R, 2014; Finance and Labor Negotiations) and Ryan M. Short (R, 2015; Public Buildings and Grounds).[35][36][37]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Tuckerton is located in the 2nd Congressional District[38] and is part of New Jersey's 9th state legislative district.[9][39][40] Prior to the 2010 Census, Tuckerton had been part of the 3rd Congressional District, a change made by the New Jersey Redistricting Commission that took effect in January 2013, based on the results of the November 2012 general elections.[41]

New Jersey's Second Congressional District is represented by Frank LoBiondo (R, Ventnor City).[42] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[43][44] and Bob Menendez (D, North Bergen).[45][46]

For the 2014-15 Session, the 9th District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Christopher J. Connors (R, Lacey Township) and in the General Assembly by DiAnne Gove (R, Long Beach Township) and Brian E. Rumpf (R, Little Egg Harbor Township).[47] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[48] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[49]

Ocean County is governed by a Board of Chosen Freeholders consisting of five members, elected on an at-large basis in partisan elections and serving staggered three-year terms of office, with either one or two seats coming up for election each year as part of the November general election.[50] At an annual reorganization held in the beginning of January, the board chooses a Director and a deputy Director from among its members. As of 2014, Ocean County's Freeholders (with department directorship, party affiliation, residence and term-end year listed in parentheses) are Freeholder Director Joseph H. Vicari (Public Works, Senior Services; R, Toms River, term ends December 31, 2014),[51] Freeholder Deputy Director John C. Bartlett, Jr. (Finance, Parks and Recreation; Pine Beach, 2015),[52] John P. Kelly (Law and Public Safety; Eagleswood Township, 2016),[53] James F. Lacey (Transportation; Brick Township, 2016)[54] and Gerry P. Little (Human Services; Surf City, 2015)[55][56][57] Constitutional officers elected on a countywide basis are County Clerk Scott M. Colabella (R, 2015, Barnegat Light),[58][59] Sheriff Michael Mastronardy (R, 2016; Toms River) and Surrogate Jeffrey Moran (R, 2018, Beachwood).[60][61][62]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 2,349 registered voters in Tuckerton, of which 370 (15.8%) were registered as Democrats, 836 (35.6%) were registered as Republicans and 1,141 (48.6%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 2 voters registered to other parties.[63] Among the borough's 2010 Census population, 70.2% (vs. 63.2% in Ocean County) were registered to vote, including 89.0% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 82.6% countywide).[63][64]

In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 54.9% of the vote here (886 cast), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 43.0% (694 votes) and other candidates with 1.5% (24 votes), among the 1,614 ballots cast by the borough's 2,417 registered voters, for a turnout of 66.8%.[65] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 60.6% of the vote here (912 ballots cast), outpolling Democrat John Kerry with 37.5% (565 votes) and other candidates with 1.1% (24 votes), among the 1,506 ballots cast by the borough's 2,243 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 67.1.[66]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 60.1% of the vote here (656 ballots cast), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 30.0% (327 votes), Independent Chris Daggett with 6.5% (71 votes) and other candidates with 1.6% (18 votes), among the 1,091 ballots cast by the borough's 2,400 registered voters, yielding a 45.5% turnout.[67]

Education[edit]

Students in public school for pre-Kindergarten through sixth grade are served by the Tuckerton School District. Students attend the Tuckerton Elementary School, which had an enrollment of 322 students as of the 2010-11 school year (based on enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics).[68]

Public school students in grades 7 - 12 attend the schools of the Pinelands Regional School District, which also serves students from Bass River Township, Eagleswood Township and Little Egg Harbor Township.[69][70] Schools in the district (with 2010-11 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[71]) are Pinelands Regional Junior High School (883 students in grades 7-9) and Pinelands Regional High School (940 students in grades 10-12).[72]

Media[edit]

Tuckerton is home to the tallest structure in New Jersey, a tower standing at 1,000 feet (300 m), which transmits Philadelphia Telemundo affiliate WWSI and Top 40 radio station WBBO, which is known as "B 98.5".

99.7 WBHX-FM is licensed to Tuckerton. The transmitter is located in Long Beach Island in Beach Haven. The station is heard up to the Toms River area, and as far south as Atlantic City. This station simulcasts "Fun 107" format from 107.1 WWZY in Long Branch.

Tuckerton is also a cable landing point of the submarine communication cables TAT-14 and GlobeNet.[73]

Attractions[edit]

Stewart's Drive-In is a popular local restaurant

The Tuckerton Seaport, which is located in the center of town on Main Street, is a working maritime museum and village, which features several re-created historic buildings and has been a major attraction since its 2000 opening.

Along Main Street in Tuckerton are several shops and stores. South of County Route 539, Main Street is bounded by Lake Pohatcong, which features a duck decoy-shaped billboard advertising the annual Decoy Show held in September at nearby Tip Seaman Park. During the Holidays, the duck is replaced with a Christmas tree. In 1995, a boardwalk was installed along the side of the road overhanging the lake. Also on Main Street is Stewart's Drive-In, which has been open continually since the 1970s.

Climate[edit]

The climate in this area is characterized by hot, humid summers and generally mild to cool winters. According to the Köppen Climate Classification system, Tuckerton has a humid subtropical climate, abbreviated "Cfa" on climate maps.[74]

References[edit]

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  2. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  3. ^ 2013 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 13, 2013.
  4. ^ a b Office of the Administrator and Municipal Clerk, Borough of Tuckerton. Accessed July 29, 2013.
  5. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 48.
  6. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Borough of Tuckerton, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 14, 2013.
  7. ^ a b "DataUniverse - 2010 Census Populations: Ocean County", Asbury Park Press. Accessed January 2, 2013.
  8. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Tuckerton borough, Ocean County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed January 3, 2013.
  9. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 6. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  10. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Tuckerton borough, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed January 3, 2013.
  11. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012 - 2012 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 7, 2013.
  12. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed January 3, 2013.
  13. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Tuckerton, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed January 3, 2013.
  14. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed August 31, 2013.
  15. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Tuckerton, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed August 31, 2013.
  16. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  17. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed October 31, 2012.
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  19. ^ "TUCKERTON AS A PORT OF ENTRY". Tuckerton Historical Society. Retrieved 2012-04-02. 
  20. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed January 3, 2013.
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  22. ^ "Ocl Tuckerton Branch Community Profile". Theoceancountylibrary.org. Retrieved 2012-04-02. 
  23. ^ "The Willet Families of North America" Willett, Albert James, Jr.
  24. ^ "Tuckerton New Jersey, New Jersey Lodging, Tuckerton NJ". Tuckerton.com. 1979-05-08. Retrieved 2012-04-02. 
  25. ^ DuPuis, E. R. Duke. "The Life and Times of Ebenezer Tucker", Tuckerton Historical Society. Accessed July 29, 2013.
  26. ^ "Tuckerton homes ripped to pieces by waves, surge". Asbury Park Press. 2012-11-03. Retrieved 2014-07-22. 
  27. ^ Barnett, Bob. Population Data for Ocean County Municipalities, 1850 - 2000, WestJersey.org, January 6, 2011. Accessed January 3, 2013.
  28. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed August 30, 2013.
  29. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 338. Accessed January 3, 2013.
  30. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 718. Accessed January 3, 2013.
  31. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 2, 2009. Accessed January 3, 2013.
  32. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Tuckerton borough, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed January 3, 2013.
  33. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Tuckerton borough, Ocean County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed January 3, 2013.
  34. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Tuckerton borough, Ocean County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed January 3, 2013.
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  38. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
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  40. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
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  42. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  43. ^ Cory A. Booker, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  44. ^ Nutt, Amy Ellis (October 31, 2013). "Booker is officially a U.S. senator after being sworn in". NJ.com/Associated Press. Accessed October 31, 2013.
  45. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013. "He currently lives in North Bergen and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
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  47. ^ Legislative Roster 2014-2015 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 24, 2014.
  48. ^ "About the Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  49. ^ "About the Lieutenant Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  50. ^ Freeholder History, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  51. ^ Freeholder Joseph H. Vicari, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  52. ^ Freeholder John C. Bartlett, Jr., Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  53. ^ Freeholder John P. Kelly, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  54. ^ Freeholder James F. Lacey, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  55. ^ Freeholder Gerry P. Little, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
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  58. ^ County Clerk, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  59. ^ Biography of Scott M. Colabella, Office of the County Clerk. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  60. ^ County Surrogate Jeffrey W. Moran, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  61. ^ 2013 Elected Officials of Ocean County, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  62. ^ 2013 General Election Winner's List, Ocean County Clerk's Office, November 6, 2013. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  63. ^ a b Voter Registration Summary - Ocean, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 23, 2011. Accessed January 3, 2013.
  64. ^ GCT-P7: Selected Age Groups: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision; 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed January 3, 2013.
  65. ^ 2008 Presidential General Election Results: Ocean County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2008. Accessed January 3, 2013.
  66. ^ 2004 Presidential Election: Ocean County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 13, 2004. Accessed January 3, 2013.
  67. ^ 2009 Governor: Ocean County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 31, 2009. Accessed January 3, 2013.
  68. ^ Data for the Tuckerton Elementary School, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed January 3, 2013.
  69. ^ Weaver, Donna. "Pinelands Board of Education passes its budget for 2008–09", The Press of Atlantic City, March 29, 2008. Accessed January 3, 2013. "The Pinelands Regional Board of Education passed its 2008–09 budget unanimously Thursday evening. The $32,488,006 regional budget is for Bass River Township, Tuckerton, Little Egg Harbor Township and Eagleswood Township. The budget comes with a 7.5 percent increase from the $30,230,088 it was in 2007–08."
  70. ^ "Regional School Districts", Burlington County Times, May 9, 2013. Accessed August 31, 2013. "PINELANDS REGIONAL - Serves: Bass River in Burlington County; Eagleswood, Little Egg Harbor and Tuckerton in Ocean County"
  71. ^ School Data for the Pinelands Regional School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed January 3, 2013.
  72. ^ New Jersey School Directory for the Pinelands Regional School District, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed July 29, 2013.
  73. ^ Home Page, Submarine Cable List. Accessed August 31, 2013.
  74. ^ Climate Summary for Tuckerton, New Jersey

External links[edit]