New Zealand Music Awards

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For the upcoming awards, see 2013 New Zealand Music Awards.
New Zealand Music Awards
Awarded for Excellence in New Zealand music
Sponsor Vodafone New Zealand
Date 1965
Country New Zealand
Presented by Recorded Music NZ
Reward Tui award trophy
Official website www.nzmusicawards.co.nz
Television/Radio coverage
Network Four

The New Zealand Music Awards are conferred annually by Recorded Music NZ, for outstanding artistic and technical achievements in the recording field. The awards are one of the most significant awards that a group or artist can receive in music in New Zealand, and have been held annually since 1965. The awards show is presented by Recorded Music NZ, and Vodafone New Zealand is the current principal sponsor. A range of award sponsors and media partners also support the event each year.

History and overview[edit]

The first awards for New Zealand recorded music were the Loxene Golden Disc awards, launched in 1965. The awards were created by soap powder manufacturer Reckitt & Colman's advertising agency, with support from the New Zealand Broadcasting Corporation (NZBC), the New Zealand Federation of Phonographic Industries and the Australasian Performing Rights Society (APRA), with the awards named after Reckitt & Colman's anti-dandruff shampoo, Loxene.[1]

While initially only one prize was given, other awards were added, including categories for record cover, recording artist of the year, and a producer award. From 1970, two awards were given - one to a solo artist, the other to a group.

The Loxene Golden Disc awards continued until 1972 when the New Zealand Federation of Phonographic Industry decided to institute its own system; these awards became known as the Recording Arts Talent Awards (RATA). From 1978 the awards became known as the RIANZ Awards after the NZFPI changed its name to the Recording Industry Association of New Zealand (RIANZ).

In 1996 and 1997 the awards were known as the Clear Music and Entertainment Awards, sponsored by Clear Communications, and in 1999 the name of the awards was finally changed to the New Zealand Music Awards, with the award trophy nicknamed the Tui.[2] Also in 1999 Coca-Cola New Zealand became the naming rights sponsor of the awards, known as the Coca-Cola New Zealand Music Awards for one year only.[3]

Since 2004, the show's principal sponsor has been Vodafone New Zealand. With Vodafone's sponsorship, the awards became known as the Vodafone New Zealand Music Awards (VNZMA's).[4]

In 2008 the awards ceremony moved to Vector Arena in Auckland, New Zealand. Prior to this move the event was primarily invitation only, and the increased size of the Vector Arena enabled the event to be attended both by invitation and by the public through sale tickets. While the Loxene Golden Disc award was televised in the 1970s, broadcasting of the contemporary award ceremony started in 2004.[1][5][6]

New Zealand Music Hall of Fame[edit]

Created in 2007 in conjunction with the Australasian Performing Right Association (APRA), the New Zealand Music Hall of Fame pays tribute to those who have "shaped, influenced and advanced popular music in New Zealand." Two musicians or groups are inducted into the hall each year, one at the APRA Silver Scroll Awards, decided by APRA, and the other is the winner of the Legacy Award at the New Zealand Music Awards, selected by Recorded Music NZ.[7]

Critics Choice award[edit]

Awarded since 2010, the Critics' Choice Prize is given to artists who are expected to be successful in the music industry in the future. To be eligible for the award, an artist must have neither released a studio album nor have been nominated for a New Zealand Music Award in the past.[8]

Awards Events[edit]

Year Date Name Host(s) Venue Broadcaster Ref(s)
1999 13 March Coca-Cola New Zealand Music Awards Jon Bridges, Nathan Rarere, Jackie Clarke Auckland Town Hall TV3/C4 [3][9]
2000 4 March New Zealand Music Awards Marcus Lush Civic Theatre Sky 1/Juice TV [10][11]
2001 2 March Francesca Rudkin TV2 [12][13]
2002 10 May [note 1] Erika Takacs and Marcus Lush St James Theatre [14]
2003 30 April Oliver Driver and Lucy Lawless Aotea Centre TV3 [15][16]
2004 22 September [note 2] Vodafone New Zealand Music Awards Jaquie Brown and Mikey Havoc C4 [17][18]
2005 5 October Jaquie Brown and Oliver Driver [19][20][21]
2006 18 October [22][23]
2007 18 October Dai Henwood [24][25]
2008 8 October Vector Arena [26][27]
2009 8 October [28]
2010 7 October Shannon Ryan and Ben Hurley [29]
2011 3 November Shannon Ryan and Ben Boyce Four [30]
2012 1 November [31]
2013 21 November Shannon Ryan and Stan Walker Four [32]
  1. ^ The awards date was moved to May to coincide with New Zealand Music Month. "Tui for a Moa?". NZ Herald. 13 April 2002. Retrieved 6 November 2012. 
  2. ^ The awards date was moved to spring so winners and nominees could benefit from the Christmas selling period. "2004 music awards broadcast across New Zealand". Scoop. Retrieved 6 November 2012. 

Winners by year[edit]

1956-1972[edit]

1973-1977[edit]

1978-current[edit]

Sources[edit]

For the record: a history of the recording industry in New Zealand. ISBN 1-86953-508-1

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Loxene Golden Disc Awards". NZ History. Retrieved 6 November 2012. 
  2. ^ "Awards Finalists". Auckland Library. Retrieved 9 November 2012. 
  3. ^ a b "New Zealand Music Awards 1999". NZine. Retrieved 6 November 2012. 
  4. ^ "The Pitch: Patronage extends from frock to rock". NZ Herald. 23 September 2004. Retrieved 6 November 2012. 
  5. ^ "Music Awards: Songbird showdown on a big night". NZ Herald. 1 November 2012. Retrieved 6 November 2012. 
  6. ^ "Award Information". Sounz. Retrieved 6 November 2012. 
  7. ^ "New Zealand Music Hall Of Fame". APRA. Retrieved 4 November 2012. 
  8. ^ "NZ Music awards set for changes". The New Zealand Herald (APN News & Media). 22 July 2010. Retrieved 22 November 2010. 
  9. ^ "COCA COLA NEW ZEALAND MUSIC AWARDS 99". NZ Film Archive. Retrieved 10 November 2012. 
  10. ^ "Fanfare: Heroic time at revamped Civic". NZ Herald. 12 February 2000. Retrieved 6 November 2012. 
  11. ^ "Civic to host music awards". NZ Herald. 4 February 2000. Retrieved 6 November 2012. 
  12. ^ "Need to know: Weekend planner". NZ Herald. 2 March 2001. Retrieved 6 November 2012. 
  13. ^ "Space Presents: The 2001 Tui's New Zealand Music Awards". IMDB. Retrieved 10 November 2012. 
  14. ^ "Tui for a Moa?". NZ Herald. 13 April 2002. Retrieved 6 November 2012. 
  15. ^ "NZ Music Awards bigger but no bolder". NZ Herald. 9 April 2003. Retrieved 6 November 2012. 
  16. ^ "2003 NZ Music Awards". NZ Musician. Retrieved 10 November 2012. 
  17. ^ "New Zealand Music Awards coming to C4". Thread. Retrieved 6 November 2012. 
  18. ^ "Scribe dominates NZ Music Awards". NZ Herald. 22 September 2004. Retrieved 6 November 2012. 
  19. ^ "Sideswipe". NZ Herald. 7 October 2005. Retrieved 6 November 2012. 
  20. ^ "Fat Freddy's Drop top music awards". NZ Herald. 6 October 2005. Retrieved 6 November 2012. 
  21. ^ "Get To The Red Carpet of the 2005 Vodafone New Zealand Music Awards". NZ Musician. Retrieved 10 November 2012. 
  22. ^ "Tuning in the Tuis". NZ Herald. 13 October 2006. Retrieved 6 November 2012. 
  23. ^ "Elemeno P cut-out for the job". NZ Herald. 18 October 2006. Retrieved 6 November 2012. 
  24. ^ "Going for Brooke - or Hollie?". NZ Herald. 13 September 2007. Retrieved 6 November 2012. 
  25. ^ "Mint Chicks, Hollie Smith dominate NZ Music Awards". NZ Herald. 19 October 2007. Retrieved 6 November 2012. 
  26. ^ "Awards music". NZ Herald. 18 September 2008. Retrieved 6 November 2012. 
  27. ^ "Dinky Dai on the night". NZ Herald. 7 October 2008. Retrieved 6 November 2012. 
  28. ^ "It’s NZ music awards time again". NZ Listener. Retrieved 6 November 2012. 
  29. ^ "Vodafone New Zealand Music Awards Finalists Showcase ready to roll". Amplifier. Retrieved 6 November 2012. 
  30. ^ "2011 VODAFONE NEW ZEALAND MUSIC AWARDS ON FOUR". Throng. Retrieved 6 November 2012. 
  31. ^ "October 27-November 2: Including the 2012 New Zealand Music Awards". NZ Listener. Retrieved 6 November 2012. 
  32. ^ "Stan to host music awards". Stuff. Retrieved 13 October 2013. 

External links[edit]