Tulita

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Tulita
Tulít’a
Hamlet
Tulita Street.jpg
Tulita is located in Northwest Territories
Tulita
Tulita
Coordinates: 64°54′01″N 125°34′39″W / 64.90028°N 125.57750°W / 64.90028; -125.57750Coordinates: 64°54′01″N 125°34′39″W / 64.90028°N 125.57750°W / 64.90028; -125.57750
Country Canada
Territory Northwest Territories
Region Sahtu Region
Constituency Sahtu
Census division Region 2
Hamlet 1 April 1984
Government
 • Mayor Danny Yakeleya
 • Senior Administrative Officer Chris Chai
 • MLA Norman Yakeleya
Area[1]
 • Land 52.12 km2 (20.12 sq mi)
Elevation 101 m (331 ft)
Population (2011)[1]
 • Total 478
 • Density 9.2/km2 (24/sq mi)
Time zone Mountain (MST) (UTC−7)
 • Summer (DST) MDT (UTC−6)
Canadian Postal code X0E 0K0
Area code(s) 867
Telephone exchange 588
- Living cost 162.5A
- Food price index 178.0B
Sources:
Department of Municipal and Community Affairs,[2]
Prince of Wales Northern Heritage Centre,[3]
Tulita profile at the Legislative Assembly[4]
Canada Flight Supplement[5]
^A 2009 figure based on Edmonton = 100[6]
^B 2010 figure based on Yellowknife = 100[6]

Tulita,[pronunciation?] which in Dene language means "where the rivers or waters meet," is a hamlet in the Sahtu Region of the Northwest Territories, Canada. It was formerly known as Fort Norman, until 1 January 1996. It is located at the junction of the Great Bear River and the Mackenzie River; the Bear originates at Great Bear Lake adjacent to Deline.

Tulita is in an area that is forested and well south of the tree line. Permafrost underlays the area, more or less continuous in distribution. Tulita is surrounded by mountains, the latter renowned for Dall's sheep, and faces the Mackenzie Mountains to the west, which has Mountain Goat.

History[edit]

Fort Norman originated as a Hudson's Bay Company trading post in the 19th century and has occupied a number of geographical locations prior to the settling of the modern community. A post by the name of Fort Norman occupied several locations, on the Mackenzie River, on the islands within it, on Bear River, and on the shore of Great Bear Lake near the present location of Deline. Who the name 'Norman' commemorates is unclear, but it may have been either Alexander Norman McLeod or Archibald Norman McLeod, both of whom were prominent in the northwest in the early 19th century.[7]

Between 1863 and 1869, Fort Norman was located on Great Bear Lake, a short distance west of the what later became Deline (Fort Franklin), and was an HBC post commanded by Nichol Taylor. Roman Catholic missionary Emile Petitot operated a small mission here during that period. In 1869, Nichol Taylor moved Fort Norman to its present position at the confluence of the Mackenzie and Bear Rivers. [8]

Fort Norman rose to importance during the 1920s oil staking rush along the Mackenzie River, 50 km (31 mi) downstream of the community, where oil was developed and marketed at what became known as Norman Wells.[9] It has also become a permanent settlement for predominately Sahtu Dene people on whose traditional land the original trading post was built. In 1996, the name of Fort Norman was officially changed to Tulita, which translates in Dene to "where the rivers or waters meet."

Demographics[edit]

The population in 2011 was 478 and was predominantly Sahtu Dene (75.2%) who speak English and North Slavey.[1][4] In 2012 the Government of the Northwest Territories reported that the population was 567 with an average yearly growth rate of 1.4% from 2001.[6] The community also includes Métis and non-Aboriginal (both 9.9%) as well as 3.0% Inuit and 2.0% other Aboriginal.[10]

Historical population
Year Pop. ±%
1996 468 —    
1997 477 +1.9%
1998 473 −0.8%
1999 490 +3.6%
2000 493 +0.6%
2001 501 +1.6%
2002 506 +1.0%
2003 508 +0.4%
2004 504 −0.8%
Year Pop. ±%
2005 525 +4.2%
2006 523 −0.4%
2007 535 +2.3%
2008 549 +2.6%
2009 562 +2.4%
2010 567 +0.9%
2011 574 +1.2%
2012 567 −1.2%
Sources: NWT Bureau of Statistics (2001-2012)[6]

Transport and tourism[edit]

Tulita may be reached via air year-round, and is served by Tulita Airport; Norman Wells is the regional centre and the site of origin of the majority of flights in. A winter road links Tulita to Wrigley and thence the Mackenzie Highway, and is only open in mid- to late winter. Summer access is available by barge or by canoe, from Hay River along the Mackenzie River. The NWT government is seeking federal funding to extend the Mackenzie Highway from Wrigley through Tulita to Tsiigehtchic.

Amenities consist of a hotel, Royal Canadian Mounted Police detachment, and a Nursing Station.[11]

First Nations[edit]

Tulita is represented by the Begade Shotagotine First Nation and belong to the Sahtu Dene Council.[12] Through the council they are in negotiations with the Government of Canada for a land claims settlement. They are also part of the Dehcho First Nations listed as the Begaee Shuhagot'ine.[13]

Notable people[edit]

Climate[edit]

Climate data for Tulita Airport
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high Humidex 3.9 4.8 6.7 19.7 29.0 34.7 37.0 44.8 26.5 20.1 4.0 −1.2 44.8
Record high °C (°F) 5.6
(42.1)
8.3
(46.9)
15.0
(59)
20.6
(69.1)
31.7
(89.1)
34.4
(93.9)
35.0
(95)
33.3
(91.9)
28.5
(83.3)
22.8
(73)
8.3
(46.9)
3.0
(37.4)
35.0
(95)
Average high °C (°F) −21.7
(−7.1)
−19.1
(−2.4)
−11.5
(11.3)
0.7
(33.3)
12.4
(54.3)
20.9
(69.6)
22.7
(72.9)
19.2
(66.6)
10.3
(50.5)
−2.2
(28)
−14.5
(5.9)
−18.6
(−1.5)
−0.1
(31.8)
Daily mean °C (°F) −25.2
(−13.4)
−23.4
(−10.1)
−17.3
(0.9)
−5.3
(22.5)
6.6
(43.9)
14.9
(58.8)
17.1
(62.8)
14.1
(57.4)
6.2
(43.2)
−5.0
(23)
−17.8
(0)
−22.3
(−8.1)
−4.8
(23.4)
Average low °C (°F) −28.7
(−19.7)
−27.6
(−17.7)
−23.0
(−9.4)
−11.3
(11.7)
0.7
(33.3)
8.9
(48)
11.5
(52.7)
9.0
(48.2)
2.1
(35.8)
−7.8
(18)
−20.7
(−5.3)
−25.9
(−14.6)
−9.4
(15.1)
Record low °C (°F) −53.9
(−65)
−54.4
(−65.9)
−50.0
(−58)
−40.0
(−40)
−23.9
(−11)
−5.6
(21.9)
−3.3
(26.1)
−7.8
(18)
−15.6
(3.9)
−32.8
(−27)
−49.0
(−56.2)
−53.3
(−63.9)
−54.4
(−65.9)
Wind chill −56.5 −57.1 −55.6 −36.3 −24.0 −5.9 0.0 0.0 −12.3 −35.4 −48.3 −55.2 −57.1
Precipitation mm (inches) 14.8
(0.583)
11.5
(0.453)
8.7
(0.343)
9.1
(0.358)
13.4
(0.528)
36.0
(1.417)
44.2
(1.74)
46.9
(1.846)
38.9
(1.531)
32.8
(1.291)
21.8
(0.858)
15.0
(0.591)
293.0
(11.535)
Rainfall mm (inches) 0.0
(0)
0.0
(0)
0.0
(0)
0.7
(0.028)
9.8
(0.386)
35.9
(1.413)
44.2
(1.74)
46.9
(1.846)
36.5
(1.437)
2.7
(0.106)
0.0
(0)
0.0
(0)
176.8
(6.961)
Snowfall cm (inches) 14.8
(5.83)
11.5
(4.53)
8.7
(3.43)
8.5
(3.35)
3.7
(1.46)
0.1
(0.04)
0.0
(0)
0.0
(0)
2.4
(0.94)
30.1
(11.85)
22.2
(8.74)
15.0
(5.91)
116.7
(45.94)
Avg. precipitation days (≥ 0.2 mm) 7.1 5.7 5.8 3.9 4.7 7.6 9.1 9.1 8.6 9.4 8.9 8.3 88.1
Avg. rainy days (≥ 0.2 mm) 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.3 3.5 7.6 9.1 9.1 7.6 1.5 0.1 0.0 38.7
Avg. snowy days (≥ 0.2 cm) 7.1 5.7 5.8 3.7 1.2 0.1 0.0 0.0 0.9 8.1 8.9 8.3 49.7
Source: Environment Canada Canadian Climate Normals 1981–2010[14]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Tulita, HAM Northwest Territories (Census subdivision)
  2. ^ "NWT Communities - Tulita". Government of the Northwest Territories: Department of Municipal and Community Affairs. Retrieved 2014-01-20. 
  3. ^ Prince of Wales Northern Heritage Centre - official names
  4. ^ a b Legislative Assembly of the Northwest Territories, Tulita profile
  5. ^ Canada Flight Supplement. Effective 0901Z 24 July 2014 to 0901Z 18 September 2014
  6. ^ a b c d Tulita - Statistical Profile at the GNWT
  7. ^ Fort Norman: History of H.B.C. Post on the Mackenzie River. The Beaver, July 1922.
  8. ^ Petitot, Emile Travels Around Great Slave and Great Bear Lakes, 1862-1882. Toronto: The Champlain Society, 2005.
  9. ^ The Story of the Fort Norman Oil Well, The Edmonton Bulletin, March 5, 1921
  10. ^ 2006 Census Tulita - Aboriginal profile
  11. ^ Tulita Infrastructure Profile
  12. ^ Indian and Northern Affairs Canada Website (Ottawa, ON: Government of Canada).
  13. ^ Dehcho First Nations' Website (Fort Simpson, NT, Canada: Band Office of Dehcho First Nations).
  14. ^ "Tulita A" (CSV (3069 KB)). Canadian Climate Normals 1981–2010. Environment Canada. Climate ID: 2201700. Retrieved 2014-01-09.