Tully (surname)

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Tully
Tully CoA.jpg
Tully of Galway Coat of Arms
Pronunciation tul-lee
Language(s) Gaelic
Origin
Meaning devoted to the will (i.e. of God)[1] or quiet, peaceful[2]
Region of origin Ireland
Other names
Related names Tally, Tilly, MacTully, MacTilly, MacAtilla, O'Multilly, O'Multully, MacCantully, and Flood

Tully is a surname of Irish origin, and spelling variations include; Tally, Tilly, MacTully, MacTilly, MacAtilla, O'Multilly, O'Multully, MacCantully, and Flood. These names are anglicisations of the following Irish names; Ó Taithligh, Ó Maoltuile, Mac Maoltuile, Mac Taichligh, and Mac an Tuile. Mac an Tuile is a corruption of Mac Maoltuile, and has also been anglicised as Flood due to "tuile" in Irish meaning "flood".[3]

Ulster[edit]

According to John O'Hart, the Tully's, in the form of the Muintir Taithligh (extended-family of Tully), were chiefs of the Hy-Laoghaire of Lough Lir. This district was near the barony of Lurg, close to Lough Erne, County Fermanagh, Northern Ireland.[4] MacLysaght states that "Tally" and "Tully" are anglicisations of a sept called O'Taithligh located near Omagh, County Tyrone, and that they were erenaghs of Devenish, which lies in western County Fermangh.[5] Woulfe connects these two as being the same also citing that their name originates from Ó Taighligh (also spelt as Ó Taichligh) meaning "descendant of Taithleach", with Taithleach meaning "quiet, peaceful".[2]

The Annals of Tigernach make mention of a Fland mac Máele Tuile[6] who was the son of Maeltuile Ua Crunnmaeil.[7] Fland is cited as chief of the Cenél nEógain and belonged to the Cenél Feradaig.[6] Maeltuile was the son of Crundmáel mac Suibni, who had also been chief of the Cenél nEógain.[7]

The Clan Tully Association's pursuivant, Andrew Tully, claims that the Clan O'Maoltuile can be traced back as chiefs of Lough Lir through Maolfreach, who was also chief of the Cenél nEógain and belonged to the Cenél maic Ercae.[8] Though Maolfreach is recorded as having died in 630 AD whereas O'Hart states the Muintir Taithligh were chiefs in the 12th century.[4][7]

Ironically, Maolfreach's son, Máel Dúin mac Máele Fithrich, was slain by Fland mac Máele Tuile in 681 at the Battle of Bla Sléibe (in modern County Londonderry).[6]

Connacht and Briefne[edit]

Tully is also an anglicisation of O Maoltuile and Mac Maoltuile, the name of a medical family that lived in present-day County Roscommon, which lies in the ancient province of Connacht.[3] Mac Maoltuile is also shortened as Mac Tuile.[9] Here it is also anglicised amongst other names as O'Multilly, O'Multully, MacAtilla, M'Cultully, M'Cuntully, and M'Ethwille.[1][3] It has also been anglicised as Flood due to a corruption of the original name to Mac an Tuile, with "tuile" meaning flood.[3]

The MacTully's are described as being the hereditary physicians of the O'Connor's of Connacht and the O'Reilly's of Kingdom of Breifne.[5] One of these Mac Tuile's is stated by an eye-witness as being present at the inauguration of Cathal O'Conor, the last king of Connacht, of which he was his physcian.[5]

O'Dugan and Keating also make mention of the MacTaichligh or MacTilly's, who they state as being chiefs in the 12th century of a district in the parish of Drung, in the barony of Tullygarvey, County Cavan, which was a part of Breifne.[10][11] Here they were subordinate to the O'Rourke's and O'Reilly's.[12]

Clan Tully Association[edit]

Badge of the Chumann Chlainne Uí Mhaoiltuile

The Clan Tully Association, or Chumann Clann ua Maoltuile, was set up in 2009, to help rally support from Tully's worldwide with the intent of reviving the Tully clanship. This was followed by a clan constitution that was submitted to a meeting of Tully representatives from across the world.[13] Upon its ratification it was stated that it was the first Clan Tully meeting since "fourteen centuries ago. It was convened on a monastic island in Loch Erne Ireland."[14]

The associations objectives include promoting the interests and welfare of Tullys worldwide, bringing them closer together, as well as the perpetuation of Gaelic culture. Along with other objectives it seeks to research and document the history of the Tully's and raise awareness of the clan.[13]

The current chairperson of the Clan Tully Association's clan council as of 2009 is Tyler M. Tully of the United States.[15]

The Clan Tully Association claim that all Tully's descend from Maoltuile, the younger brother of Maoldoon, sons of Maolfreach. This claim is partially backed up by The Irish Liber Hymnorum which states "And from Mael-tuile son of Mael-fith . . are the race of Mac Mael-tuile".[16] John O'Hart also states a Maoltuile as the son of Maolfreach.[10]

See also[edit]

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Woulfe, Patrick (1923). Irish Names and Surnames. Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Company. p. 612. Retrieved 2011-02-03. 
  2. ^ a b c Woulfe, Patrick (1923). Irish Names and Surnames - Ó TAITHLIGH. Library Ireland: Genealogical Publishing Company. Retrieved 2011-02-03. "Ó TAITHLIGH—I—O Talheighe, Tally, Tully, Tilly; 'descendant of Taithleach' (quiet, peaceful); also Ó Taichligh; the name (1) of a Tyrone family who were chiefs of Ui Laoghaire; and (2) of an ecclesiastical family in Fermanagh." 
  3. ^ a b c d e Woulfe, Patrick (1923). Irish Names and Surnames. Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Company. p. 390. Retrieved 2011-02-03. "Mac Maeoltuile-IV-M'Cultully, M'Cuntully, M'Cantully, M'Ethwille, MacAtilla, Tully and, by 'translation,' Flood; 'son of Maoltuile' (devoted to the will, i.e., of God); older Mac Maoltuile, q.v.; the name of a medical family in Co. Roscommon, who were hereditary physicians to the O'Connors of Connacht. The name has been long corrupted to Mac an Tuile 'son of the flood,' and accordingly angl. Flood." 
  4. ^ a b c O'Hart, John (1876). "4. Fermanagh a. The Irish Chiefs and Clans.". Irish pedigrees; or, The origin and stem of the Irish nation. p. 250. "The following were the Chiefs and Clans of Fermanagh, and the territories they possessed in the twelfth century:--...3.Muintir Taithligh, Tilly or Tully, chiefs of Hy-Laoghaire [O'Leary] of Lough Lir, a district which lay in the barony of Lurg near Lough Erne towards Tyrone" 
  5. ^ a b c d MacLysaght, Edward. "Tully". Surnames of Ireland. Dublin, Republic of Ireland. "The original, written by an eye witness of the inauguration of Cathal O'Connor, last King of Connacht, describes MacTully (Mac Tuile) who was present as O'Connor's physician. The MacTullys were in fact hereditary physicians not only to the O'Connors but also to the O'Reillys of Breffny. This accounts for the modern distribution of the name given above..Tully, alias Tally, is also the anglicized form of the Irish surname O Taithligh borne by a sept located near Omagh, Co. Tyrone, of which, however, little trace remains to-day. They were erenaghs of Devernish." 
  6. ^ a b c d The Annals of Tigernach. Retrieved 2011-02-02. "T681.1 - Combustio regum i n-Dun Ceithirn .i. Dunghal mac Scandail rí Cruithnech & Cend Faelach ri Cianachta Glindi Gemín ín initio estatis la Mael Duín mac Maile Fithrigh. Cath Blái Slebe postea iter Mael Duin mac Maile Fithrigh & Fland Find mac Maile Tuile la Cianachta Glinne Gemin." 
  7. ^ a b c d The Annals of the Four Masters. Retrieved 2011-02-02. "M650.4 - The battle of Fleascach, by Crunnmael, son of Suibhne, chief of Cinel Eoghain, in which was slain Cumascach, son of Oilioll, chief of Ui Cremhthainn. M698.6 - Flann Finn, son of Maeltuile Ua Crunnmaeil, chief of Cinel Eoghain, died." 
  8. ^ a b Tully, Andrew (2009), "History of the O'Maoltuile Clan, today known as the Tully Clan" (PDF), in Tully, Andrew, Clant Tully Association Publications, South Africa: Clan Tully Association, pp. 5–6, retrieved 2011-02-01, "It is likely that as our family who’s pedigree can be traced back to Maolfreach, and thereafter as Chiefs in Lough Lir County Fermanagh as Cinel nEogain expanded their area of influence to the borders of Counties Cavan and Longford, some of our ancestors branched out as hereditary physicians to the O'Connor’s in northern County Galway and also as hereditary physicians to the O'Reillys in County Cavan" 
  9. ^ a b Woulfe, Patrick (1923). Irish Names and Surnames. Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Company. p. 412. Retrieved 2011-02-03. 
  10. ^ a b c d O'Hart, John (1876). Irish pedigrees: or, The origin and stem of the Irish nation, Volume 1. Dublin, Edinburgh, London: McGlashan & Gill. p. 714. Retrieved 2011-02-01. 
  11. ^ a b Keating, Geoffrey; O'Mahony, John (1857). The history of Ireland from the earliest period to the English invasion. New York, New York: P.M. Haverty. p. 733. Retrieved 2011-02-03. "17. Mau Taichlaigh, or Mac Tully. The Mac Tullys were chiefs of a district comprising the greater part of the parish of Drung. In the barony of Tullygarvey." 
  12. ^ a b O'Hart, John (1892). "Principal Families of Ulster: In Brefney: 1 Cavan and Leitrim". Irish Pedigrees; or, the Origin and Stem of the Irish Nation 17. Dublin, Republic of Ireland. "1. O'Ruairc or O'Rourke; and O'Raghallaigh or O'Reilly; these were the Princes of the territory of Bréifne with Mac Gilla Duib (Mac Gilduff) noted as chiefs of Tullygarvey (also known as Telach Gairbheth, alias Tellach Garbha. Subordinate to these was MacTaichligh or MacTully, chief of a district in the parish of Drung, in the barony of Tullygarvey" 
  13. ^ a b c "History In the Making". The Wolf's Head; The Official Newsletter of the Clan Tully Association (Clan Tully Association). June 2009. Retrieved 2011-02-02. "The first order of business was to ratify the new Clan Tully Constitution, also known as Bunreacht Chumann Clann ua Maoltuile. The Constitution was ratified by unanimous consent after its author, Tyler M. Tully of America gave an overview of the document and answered questions." 
  14. ^ a b "History In the Making". The Wolf's Head; The Official Newsletter of the Clan Tully Association (Clan Tully Association). June 2009. Retrieved 2011-02-02. "History's last recorded meeting of the Clan Tully took place some fourteen centuries ago. It was convened on a monastic island in Loch Erne," 
  15. ^ a b "Clan Tully Association; Council Members". 2009. Retrieved 2011-02-02. 
  16. ^ a b Bernard, D.D., Fellow of Trinity College, and Archbishiop King, J.H.; Atkinson, LL.D. Professor of Sanskrit in the University of Dublin., R. (1898). "Notes. Z. [The Destruction of the Ungodly and the Rewards of the Righteous]". The Irish Liber hymnorum. Henry Bradshaw Society XIV (London.: Harrison and Sons). p. 168. Retrieved 2011-02-03. "F fol. 3 marg.] This note, copied at vol. i. p. 83, is in a late Irish hand. Its translation is: "Benediction from O'Domnal mac Dabog son of Mael-tuile with this book ; and it is Colum Cill who sent them themselves for cure, from the battle of Cuil Dremne. And from Mael-tuile son of Mael-fith . . are the race of Mac Mael-tuile, i.e. of the descendants of Neill of the Nine Hostages. Finit."