Tulsa Oilers

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For other sports teams using the same name, see Tulsa Oilers (disambiguation).
Tulsa Oilers
2014–15 Tulsa Oilers season
TulsaOilers.PNG
City Tulsa, Oklahoma
League Central Hockey League
Conference Berry
Founded 1992
Home arena BOK Center
Colors

Maroon, navy blue, gray, white

                   
Owner(s) Jeff Lund
General manager Taylor Hall
Head coach Bruce Ramsay
Affiliates Unaffiliated
Franchise history
1992–present Tulsa Oilers
Championships
Regular season titles None
Division Championships None
Conference Championships None
Ray Miron President's Cup 1993

The Tulsa Oilers are a professional ice hockey team which plays in the Central Hockey League (CHL). The Oilers played their home games at the Maxwell Center (also known as Tulsa Convention Center) until 2008 when they moved into the new BOK Center. For many years, the Tulsa Oilers name was shared with Tulsa's former minor-league baseball team that pre-dated the Tulsa Drillers. To reduce confusion in local news reporting, the hockey team was often called the "Ice Oilers", a moniker that continues to this day among many Tulsans.

The Oilers are one of only two teams original teams which have played every season in the CHL since it was founded in 1992 (the other being the Wichita Thunder).[1] The Oilers established a winning tradition, making the playoffs in 9 of their first 13 seasons. However, their performance in recent years has been less successful: they have only made the playoffs once since 2005. In 2011, they won in the first round against the Mississippi RiverKings, but lost in the second round to the Bossier-Shreveport Mudbugs.[2]

Present owner Jeff Lund played an integral part in assembling the 1992–93 team, a scrappy bunch led by veteran minor league coach and former NHL ironman Garry Unger. The team, anchored by high-scoring forward Sylvain Naud and veteran goalie Tony Martino, finished the regular season in second place, right behind intrastate rival Oklahoma City. However, in the revived league's first championship series the Oilers handily defeated the Blazers, clinching the title on OKC's home ice. Lund assumed ownership of the franchise in February 1999 after being the team's General Manager.[3] Under Lund's direction, over two million fans have attended an Oilers game at the Tulsa Convention Center. Lund currently sits on the CHL Executive Committee.

History[edit]

Tulsa has had several other hockey teams in its history, all nicknamed the "Oilers."

Tulsa Oilers: 1926–1942 (AHA)[edit]

Tulsa Oilers (1968)

The original Oilers joined the five team American Hockey Association as an expansion team in 1928. Their first home game was January 1, 1929, against the Duluth Hornets as part of the grand opening of the Tulsa Coliseum. The team won the AHA championship that season, and again in the 1930–31 season. For the 1932–33 season, the Oilers moved to St. Paul, Minnesota and became the St. Paul Greyhounds, but halfway through the season they moved back to Tulsa once again becoming the Tulsa Oilers. At the end of the 1941–42 season the AHA disbanded due to World War II.

Tulsa Oilers: 1945–1951 (USHL)[edit]

Tulsa Oilers (1972-1982)

The AHA was reorganized as the United States Hockey League for the 1945–46 season as a seven team league, once again including the Oilers. That league folded after the 1950–51 season. The team played at Avey's Coliseum during this time.

Tulsa Oilers: 1964–1984 (CHL)[edit]

The original Central Professional Hockey League began its operations with the 1963–64 season, with the Tulsa Oilers joining that league for the 1964–65 season. The Oilers won the Adams Cup as the CHL champions in 1968, 1976, and 1984.

Tulsa Oilers: 1992 – present (CHL)[edit]

A new Central Hockey League was created in 1992 as a centrally owned league, owned by Ray Miron and Bill Levins. The league was operated by Ray and Monte Miron and funded by Chicago businessman and minor league sports entrepreneur Horn Chen. With the creation of the new CHL the Tulsa Oilers were a team once again. Ray Miron once coached the Oilers in the old CHL and his son Monte had played for the Oilers in 1973–74. Tulsa claimed the CHL championship in the CHL's inaugural season under General Manager Jeff Lund as head coach Garry Unger.[4]

The Oilers established a winning tradition, making the playoffs in nine of their first 13 seasons. However, with a decline in their performance and not qualifying for the playoffs since 2005 nor winning a playoff series since 1994, owner Jeff Lund hired former player Taylor Hall as Oilers General Manager on May 3, 2008.[5] After finishing third to last in the CHL with 18 wins in 64 games in the 2008–09 season, Hall hired Head Coach Bruce Ramsay, fresh off a trip to the IHL's Turner Cup finals with the Muskegon Fury, on May 21, 2009.[6]

In Ramsay's first season as coach in 2009–10 season, the Oilers rebounded with 28 wins in 64 games to post the second highest point total increase in the CHL from the previous season.[7] On September 2, 2010, the Oilers announced their first National Hockey League affiliation since their reformation in 1992 with the Colorado Avalanche, joining the Lake Erie Monsters of the AHL.[8]

Season-by-season[edit]

Season Division Regular season Playoffs
Games Played Wins Losses Overtime Losses
Tulsa Oilers
2004–05 Northeast 60 32 25 3
2005–06 Northwest 64 29 28 7
2006–07 Northeast 64 27 28 9
2007–08 Northwest 64 25 35 4
2008–09 Northeast 64 18 38 8
2009–10 Northern Conference 64 28 29 7
2010–11 Berry Conference 66 35 25 6
2011–12 Berry Conference 66 29 29 8
2012–13 Berry Conference 66 22 39 5

Championships[edit]

Year League Trophy
1928–29 AHA Harry F. Sinclair Trophy
1930–31 AHA Harry F. Sinclair Trophy
1967–68 CPHL Adams Cup
1975–76 CHL Adams Cup
1983–84 CHL Adams Cup
1992–93 CHL William “Bill” Levins Memorial Cup

Current roster[edit]

Updated August 28, 2014.[9][10]

# Nat Player Pos S/G Age Acquired Birthplace Contract
27 United States Cramer, RyanRyan Cramer RW R 28 2011 International Falls, Minnesota Oilers
20 United States Fisher, DrewDrew Fisher LW L 27 2012 International Falls, Minnesota Oilers
13 United States Gordon, BenBen Gordon LW L 29 2012 International Falls, Minnesota Oilers
Canada Lachance, CharlesCharles Lachance F L 26 2014 Quebec, Quebec Oilers
7 Canada LeBlond, ChapenChapen LeBlond F R 23 2014 Terrace, British Columbia Oilers
4 Canada Lutz, NathanNathan Lutz D L 36 2013 Mistatim, Saskatchewan Oilers
8 Canada Macaulay, ScottScott Macaulay D 23 2013 Winnipeg, Manitoba Oilers
28 United States Mele, SteveSteve Mele F R 25 2014 Bronx, New York Oilers
Canada Noble, KevinKevin Noble D L 27 2014 Sparwood, British Columbia Oilers
Canada O'Quinn, BenBen O'Quinn C R 23 2014 Woodstock, Ontario Oilers
16 United States Obermeyer, JakeJake Obermeyer D R 29 2013 Chanhassen, Minnesota Oilers
Canada Phaneuf, Marc-OlivierMarc-Olivier Phaneuf LW L 20 2014 Boucherville, Quebec Oilers
11 Canada Pleskach, AdamAdam Pleskach RW L 26 2011 Beausejour, Manitoba Oilers
24 United States Tallent, EricEric Tallent D R 28 2013 Garland, Texas Oilers
United States Zacharias, MikeMike Zacharias G L 29 2014 Plymouth, Minnesota Oilers

References[edit]

  1. ^ Bill Haisten, "Blazers' end might spell trouble for Tulsa Oilers", Tulsa World, July 15, 2009.
  2. ^ "CHL Playoffs 2011". Central Hockey League. Retrieved 2013-01-13. 
  3. ^ "Tulsa Oilers owner Jeff Lund wins 2008-09 CHL Rick Kozuback Award". mlntherawfeed.com. 2009-03-19. Retrieved 2010-09-02. 
  4. ^ "Unger in Alumni game". Tulsa Oilers. 2010-08-26. Retrieved 2010-09-02. 
  5. ^ "Former player Taylor Hall rejoins the Oilers as General Manager". mlntherawfeed.com. 2008-05-03. Retrieved 2010-09-02. 
  6. ^ "Tulsa Oilers name Bruce Ramsay coach". mlntherawfeed.com. 2009-05-21. Retrieved 2010-09-02. 
  7. ^ "Oilers to play in Berry conference". Tulsa Oilers. 2010-08-04. Retrieved 2010-09-02. 
  8. ^ "Tulsa announces affiliation with Avs". Colorado Avalanche. 2010-09-02. Retrieved 2010-09-02. 
  9. ^ "Tulsa Oilers - Team". Tulsa Oilers. Retrieved 2013-01-09. 
  10. ^ "The Center of Hockey - News". Central Hockey League. Retrieved 2013-01-09. 

External links[edit]