Turkish Armenian Reconciliation Commission

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The Turkish Armenian Reconciliation Commission was made in 2001 to help Turkey and Armenia be closer. The main goal was to make the governments more active.

In February 2002 an independent legal opinion commissioned by the International Center for Transitional Justice, at the request of Turkish Armenian Reconciliation Commission, concluded that the Ottoman massacre of Armenians in 1915–1918 "include[d] all of the elements of the crime of genocide as defined in the [Genocide] Convention, and legal scholars as well as historians, politicians, journalists and other people would be justified in continuing to so describe them".[1]

Members[edit]

  • Gunduz Aktan (Ankara) - resigned June 2003
  • Alexander Arzoumanian (Yerevan)
  • Ustun Erguder (Istanbul)
  • Sadi Erguvenc (Istanbul) - resigned June 2003
  • David Hovhannissian (Yerevan)
  • Van Krikorian (New York)
  • Andranik Migranian (Moscow)
  • Ozdem Sanberk (Istanbul) - resigned June 2003
  • Ilter Turkmen (Istanbul)
  • Vamik Volkan (Charlottesville)

Newer Members (2003-2004)

  • Emin Mahir Balcioglu (Geneva)
  • Ahmet Evin (Istanbul)
  • Ersin Kalaycioglu (Istanbul)
  • Sule Kut (Istanbul)
  • Ilter Turan (Istanbul)

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ "The Applicability of the United Nations Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide to the Events Which Occurred During the Early Twentieth Century.", International Center for Transitional Justice.
    • Page 2: "This memorandum was drafted by independent legal counsel based on a request made to the International Center for Transitional Justice ("ICTJ"), on the basis of the Memorandum of Understanding ("MoU") entered into by The Turkish Armenian Reconciliation Commission ("TARC") on July 12, 2002 and presentations by members of TARC on September 10, 2002".
    • Page 18: D. Conclusion "... Because the other three elements identified above have been definitively established, the Events, viewed collectively, can thus be said to include all of the elements of the crime of genocide as defined in the Convention, and legal scholars as well as historians, politicians, journalists and other people would be justified in continuing to so describe them."

References[edit]