Turks in Sweden

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Turks in Sweden
Total population
100,000[1][2]-150,000[3][4] 200,000[5]
Plus a further 30,000 Turks from Bulgaria [6]
Regions with significant populations
Stockholm (Rinkeby, Tensta, Alby)  · Gothenburg (Biskopsgården, Hisingen)  · Malmö (Rosengard)
Languages
Turkish  · Swedish
Religion
Sunni Islam

Turks in Sweden or Swedish Turks (Swedish: Turkar i Sverige; Turkish: Isveç Türkleri) are people of Turkish ethnicity living in Sweden. According to the Swedish Minister for Foreign Affairs, there are 100,000 people in Sweden with a Turkish background, and a further 10,000 Swedish-Turks live in Turkey.[2]

Notable people[edit]

Fittja Mosque, a Turkish mosque in Stockholm

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency. "Turkiet är en viktig bro mellan Öst och Väst". Retrieved 2011-04-14. 
  2. ^ a b Swedish Ministry for Foreign Affairs. "Ankara Historia". Retrieved 2011-04-14. 
  3. ^ Hava, Ergin (15 April 2011). "Swedish trade minister Ewa Björling calls on Turkey to cooperate in third countries". Sundays Zaman. Retrieved 15 April 2011. 
  4. ^ Hurriyet Daily News. "Businessman invites Swedes for cheap labor, regional access". Retrieved 2011-04-14. 
  5. ^ http://www.haberler.com/gurbetciler-isvec-te-turk-bankasi-istiyor-3894284-haberi/
  6. ^ Laczko, Stacher & Klekowski von Koppenfels 2002, 187.

Bibliography[edit]

  • Laczko, Frank; Stacher, Irene; Klekowski von Koppenfels, Amanda (2002). New challenges for Migration Policy in Central and Eastern Europe. Cambridge University Press. ISBN 90-6704-153-X .

Further reading[edit]

  • Abadan-Unat N. (2004) Disputed models of integration: Multiculturalism, Institutionalization of religion, political participation presented in “Conference integration of immigrants from Turkey in Belgium, France, Denmark and Sweden” 2004 Bosphorus University Istanbul.
  • Akpınar, Aylin (2004). Integration of immigrants from Turkey in Sweden: The case of women presented in “Conference integration of immigrants from Turkey in Belgium, France, Denmark and Sweden” 2004 Bosphorus University Istanbul.
  • Aksoy, A. and Robins, K. (2002) “Banal Transnationalism: The Difference that Television Makes.” ESRC Transnational Communities Programme. Oxford: WPTC-02-08.
  • Appadurai, A. (1996) Modernity at Large: Cultural Dimensions of Globalization . Minneapolis and London: University of Minnesota Press
  • Bibark, Mutlu (2005) Uluslararası Türk-Etnik Yerel Medyası ve Adiyet Tasarımlarının inşaasında rolü / Trans-national Turkish Ethnic Media and its role in construction of identity design. From Yurtdışındaki Türk Medyası Sempozyumu: Bildiriler / Proceedings from conference on Turkish Media Abroad (ed.) Abdülrezzak Altun.Ankara University Faculty of Communication.
  • Cohen, R. (1997) ‘Global diasporas: an introduction’. London: UCL Press.
  • Georgiou, M and Silverstone, R. (2005) “Editorial Introduction: Media and ethnic minorities in Europe” Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies Vol. 31, No. 3, May 2005, pp 433–441. Routledge. Taylor & Francis group. London
  • Paine, S. (1974) Exporting workers: the Turkish case, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press
  • Theolin, Sture (2000) The Swedish palace in Istanbul: A thousand years of cooperation between Turkey and Sweden, Yapı Kredi yayıncılık AS. Istanbul, Turkey.
  • Westin, Charles (2003) “Young People of Migrant Origin in Sweden” in Migration and Labour in Europe. Views from Turkey and Sweden. Emrehan Zeybekoğlu and Bo Johansson (eds.), (Istanbul: MURCIR & NIWL, 2003)

External links[edit]