Turnbull National Wildlife Refuge

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Turnbull National Wildlife Refuge
Columbia plateau trail IMG 1549.jpg
The ecological transition between the dry, sagebrush dotted grasslands of the Columbia Basin up toward the timbered Selkirk and Bitterroot Mountains provides excellent wildlife habitat.
Location Spokane County, Washington
Nearest city Cheney, Washington
Coordinates 47°25′23″N 117°33′59″W / 47.42306°N 117.56639°W / 47.42306; -117.56639Coordinates: 47°25′23″N 117°33′59″W / 47.42306°N 117.56639°W / 47.42306; -117.56639
Area 16,000 acres (65 km2)
Established 1937
Governing body U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

The Turnbull National Wildlife Refuge was established in 1937 by an Executive Order of President Franklin D. Roosevelt is located six miles (10 km) south of Cheney, Washington on the eastern edge of the Columbia Basin, in Spokane County in northeastern Washington. Turnbull NWR encompasses approximately 16,000 acres (65 km2) of the Channeled Scablands. The ecosystem that predominates the Turnbull is unique within the National Wildlife Refuge System and has characteristics that distinguish it from natural reserves worldwide. The powerful forces of volcanism, glaciation and the largest flood in geological history have combined to forge a distinct environment. The combination of basalt outcrops, channeled canyons and ponderosa pine forests infused in a diverse landscape of over 130 marshes, wetlands and lakes, create an environment of aesthetic beauty as well as high quality wildlife habitat. Refuge ecosystems represent an ecological transition between the dry, sagebrush dotted grasslands of the Columbia Basin and the timbered Selkirk and Bitteroot Mountain Ranges that rise up to the east. The 3,036 acres (12.29 km2) of wetlands on Turnbull NWR represent some of the last quality breeding habitat available in eastern Washington for waterfowl, which have experienced tremendous population declines across North America due to loss and degradation of breeding, migration and wintering habitat.


Geology[edit]

The Refuge is situated within the Channeled Scablands, an area formed 16,000 years ago by Missoula Floods during the last ice age. The powerful forces of the volcanism which formed the Columbia Plateau, glaciation and a series of large floods combined to form an environment unique in many respects. The combination of scablands, basalt outcrops, channeled canyons, ponderosa pine forests and meadows provide a diverse landscape with over 130 marshes, wetlands and lakes. The area provides a high quality wildlife habitat in an ecosystems that represents an ecological transition between the dry, sagebrush dotted grasslands of the Columbia Basin up toward the timbered Selkirk and Bitterroot Mountain Ranges that rise up to the east.

Wildlife and Habitat[edit]

The Turnbull National Wildlife Refuge was established to provide productive breeding and nesting grounds for migratory birds and other wildlife, and it encompasses approximately 16,000 acres (65 km²) of the Channeled Scablands. The ecosystem that predominates the Refuge is unique within the National Wildlife Refuge System and has characteristics that distinguish it from natural reserves worldwide. The 3,036 acres (12 km²) of wetlands on Turnbull NWR represent some of the last quality breeding habitat available in eastern Washington for waterfowl, which have experienced tremendous population declines across North America due to loss and degradation of breeding, migration and wintering habitat.

Access[edit]

The Columbia Plateau Trail provides access to the refuge. The Pine Lake Loop Trail, designated a National Recreation Trail in 2006, provides 1.25 miles (2.01 km) of wheelchair accessible hiking along Winslow Pool and around Pine Lake.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Pine Lake Loop Trail". American Trails. 2013-04-23. Retrieved 2014-08-14. 

External links[edit]