Tuscan florin

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Tuscan florin
fiorino (Italian)
Fiorino 1856.jpg
One florin by Leopold II
User(s) Austria Tuscany
Subunit
 1/100 quattrino
Symbol ƒ
Coins q.1, q.3, q.5, q.10, q.20, p.1
ƒ1, ƒ2, ƒ4
 Rarely used ƒ¼, ƒ½, ƒ20, ƒ60, ƒ80
Mint Florence Mint
This infobox shows the latest status before this currency was rendered obsolete.

The florin (Italian: fiorino) was the currency of Tuscany between 1826 and 1859. It was subdivided into 100 quattrini (singular: quattrino), a local currency made by four pennies (from the Latin: quater denarii). There was an additional denomination called the paolo, worth 40 quattrini, in circulation.

History[edit]

During the Napoleonic Wars, Tuscany was annexed by France and the French franc was introduced, together with its satellite Italian lira. Previous Tuscan pound did not disappear, but a big confusion was created between the old pound (called lira in Italian) and the new lira. So, when Duke Leopold II rose to power in 1824, he decided to introduce a new basic currency. The florin replaced the Tuscan pound at a rate of 1⅔ pounds = 1 florin.[1] In 1847, Tuscany absorbed Lucca and the florin replaced the Luccan pound at a rate of 1 florin = 2 pounds. After a brief revolutionary coinage, the florin was replaced in 1859 by a provisional currency denominated in "Italian lira", equal to the Sardinian lira, with 1 florin = 1.4 Italian lire.

Coins[edit]

Copper coins were struck in denominations of 1 and 3 quattrini, together with billon 5 and 10 quattrini, silver ½, 1 and 5 paolo, ¼, ½, 1 and 4 florins. Gold coins included the sequin (Italian: zecchino), ruspone and 80 florins, the latter two equalled 3 and 10 sequins respectively.

References[edit]

  1. ^ This fact was quite obvious, because the pound was equivalent to 240 pennies or 60 quattrini, while the florin was equivalent to 100 quattrini or 400 pennies.

External links[edit]