Twenty Four Seven Tour

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Twenty Four Seven Tour
Tfsttina.jpg
Promotional poster for Turner's 2000 tour
Tour by Tina Turner
Associated album Twenty Four Seven
Start date March 23, 2000 (2000-03-23)
End date December 6, 2000 (2000-12-06)
Legs 3
Shows 95 in North America
26 in Europe
121 Total
Tina Turner concert chronology
Wildest Dreams Tour
(1996-97)
Twenty Four Seven Tour
(2000)
Tina!: 50th Anniversary Tour'
(2008-09)

The Twenty Four Seven Tour (also known as the Twenty Four Seven Millennium Tour and 24/7 World Tour) is the eighth concert tour by American singer, Tina Turner. The tour promoted her final studio album, Twenty Four Seven. Although she stated this numerous times in the past, Turner announced that feat would be her final "show stopping" tour. She stated she would continue to make records and perform at small venues and award shows. The tour was sponsored by E*Trade.[1]

Actress Gloria Reuben served as a background dancer and singer during the first North American leg of the tour.[2] According to Pollstar, the 2000 tour became the highest grossing tour in North America. This status was achieved over her peers, Barbra Streisand and Bruce Springsteen as well as, newcomers 'N Sync and Britney Spears. The North American tour dates grossed over $80 million.[3]

However, Turner would return to touring in 2008 with her anniversary tour.

Background[edit]

After her recording breaking 1996 world tour, Turner decided to take a longer break between albums and tours. Initially, Turner planned an elaborate co-headlining tour with Elton John. The two performed a duet of Turner's hit "Proud Mary" and John's The Bitch is Back on the VH1 special, "Divas Live '99". During rehearsals, Turner felt unease with the music and stopped everyone from playing and then instructed John on how to play the song.

"I made a mistake when I needed to show him how to play 'Proud Mary'. The mistake is you don't show Elton John how to play his piano. He just went into a rage, which he apologized for later. He said it was wrong."

—Tina Turner, CBS News[4]

The tour plans were cancelled and Turner went to the studio to record her final studio album. Along the way, Turner also performed the Super Bowl XXXIV presume ceremonies.

To introduce the tour, Turner stated:[4]

It's a play. It's an act. For the moment, it's a small movie, so to speak. That's why I like all of the stuff and the action and the playoff between me and the girls. It's life on that stage for that two hours.

Development[edit]

As mentioned above, the tour initially was set to promote her latest studio album. During promotion, Turner acknowledge the tour as her final one as she enters pseudo-retirement. She comments:[5]

I've been performing for 44 years; I really should hang up my dancing shoes. I can't keep up with Janet Jackson. I'm not a diva like Diana Ross. I'm rock 'n' roll, but I'm happy I can do it one more time, so people can remember me at my best."

The album played a prominent role in the tour as Turner rehearsed "Whatever You Need", "When the Heartache is Over", "Talk to My Heart", "Falling", "Don't Leave Me This Way" (which was to be included in a ballads medley with "Two People" and two other unknown songs) and "Twenty Four Seven". When Turner decided to do a retrospective of her career, she included her first hit, "A Fool in Love", the first time Turner performed the song live since the 1970s. Turner also rehearsed "Ooh Poo Pah Do" but replaced with "Get Back". Additionally, she included some of her have favorite R&B hits including, "Hold On, I'm A Comin'" and "I Heard It Through the Grapevine".

"It has been described as a stadium tour in an arena. [it's] hugely complicated and one of the largest arena shows to ever go out and tour back-to-back."

—Mark Fisher

For her final outing, Turner wanted a stage that was sleek and modern. Her original concepts included the framing of an "apartment building" that had cabins and access ramps. Also included were risers with visible staircases and front drop for the musicians. Fisher, also wanted to create a volcano effect with the staging, have it split into two sets. This inner stage included a video screen and a ramp leading to an upstage platform. There was an additional ramp that lead downstage. The main feature of the stage was the "cantilever arm". A 2' wide, 60' long platform that extended Turner into the audience. Initially, Turner did not want the arm as the same concept was used for her 1990 European tour and she did not want to repeat herself. However, after seining video animations, Turner wanted the arm included. For stadium shows, a roof for the stage was added along with additional video screens. The arm was extended an additional 20 feet. It took at least seven hours to construct the stage.[6]

The stage was constructed by McLaren Engineering Group.[7]

Opening act[edit]

Set list[edit]

Tour dates[edit]

Date City Country Venue
North America[1][8][10]
March 23, 2000 Minneapolis United States Target Center
March 24, 2000 Madison Kohl Center
March 25, 2000 Rosemont Allstate Arena
March 26, 2000 Auburn Hills The Palace of Auburn Hills
March 30, 2000 Cleveland Gund Arena
March 31, 2000 Louisville Freedom Hall
April 1, 2000 Greensboro Greensboro Coliseum
April 3, 2000 Philadelphia First Union Center
April 7, 2000 New York City Madison Square Garden
April 8, 2000
April 9, 2000 Buffalo HSBC Arena
April 12, 2000 Atlanta Philips Arena
April 14, 2000 Tampa Ice Palace
April 15, 2000 Sunrise National Car Rental Center
April 16, 2000
April 19, 2000 New Orleans New Orleans Arena
April 20, 2000 Dallas Reunion Arena
April 21, 2000 San Antonio Alamodome
April 23, 2000 Houston Compaq Center
April 27, 2000 Phoenix America West Arena
April 28, 2000 San Diego San Diego Sports Arena
April 29, 2000 Las Vegas MGM Grand Garden Arena
May 3, 2000 Sacramento ARCO Arena
May 4, 2000 Anaheim Arrowhead Pond of Anaheim
May 5, 2000
May 6, 2000 San Jose San Jose Arena
May 8, 2000 Oakland The Arena in Oakland
May 12, 2000 Tacoma Tacoma Dome
May 13, 2000 Vancouver Canada General Motors Place
May 15, 2000 Salt Lake City United States Delta Center
May 17, 2000 Denver Pepsi Center
May 19, 2000 Kansas City Kemper Arena
May 20, 2000 Moline MARK of the Quad Cities
May 21, 2000 St. Louis Kiel Center
May 24, 2000 Milwaukee Bradley Center
May 26, 2000 Indianapolis Conseco Fieldhouse
May 27, 2000 Rosemont Allstate Arena
May 28, 2000 Cincinnati Firstar Center
June 1, 2000 Auburn Hills The Palace of Auburn Hills
June 2, 2000 Grand Rapids Van Andel Arena
June 3, 2000 Columbus Jerome Schottenstein Center
June 4, 2000 Toronto Canada Air Canada Centre
June 8, 2000 Boston United States FleetCenter
June 9, 2000
June 10, 2000 Montreal Canada Molson Centre
June 11, 2000 Ottawa Corel Centre
June 14, 2000 Bristow United States Nissan Pavilion at Stone Ridge
June 15, 2000 Hartford Hartford Civic Center
June 16, 2000 East Rutherford Continental Airlines Arena
Europe[5][10]
June 30, 2000 Zürich Switzerland Letzigrund Stadion
July 1, 2000
July 3, 2000 Hanover Germany Niedersachsenstadion
July 5, 2000 Paris France Stade de France
July 7, 2000 Glasgow Scotland Hampden Park
July 9, 2000 Cardiff Wales Millennium Stadium
July 11, 2000 Dublin Ireland RDS Arena
July 13, 2000 Sheffield England Don Valley Stadium
July 15, 2000 London Wembley Stadium
July 16, 2000
July 18, 2000 Groningen Netherlands Stadtspark
July 19, 2000 Hamburg Germany Volksparkstadion
July 21, 2000 Berlin Olympic Stadium
July 23, 2000 Munich Olympic Stadium
July 25, 2000 Werchter Belgium Werchter Festival Grounds
July 27, 2000 Frankfurt Germany Waldstadion
July 28, 2000 Cologne Müngersdorfer Stadion
July 30, 2000 Leipzig Zentralstadion
August 1, 2000 Vienna Austria Ernst Happel Stadion
August 3, 2000 Copenhagen Denmark Parken Stadium
August 5, 2000 Gothenburg Sweden Ullevi
August 6, 2000 Oslo Norway Valle Hovin
August 9, 2000 Helsinki Finland Finnair Stadium
August 10, 2000
August 12, 2000 Tallinn Estonia Tallinn Song Festival Grounds
August 15, 2000 Sopot Poland Sopot Hippodrome
North America[5][10]
September 20, 2000 Boston United States FleetCenter
September 22, 2000 Philadelphia First Union Center
September 23, 2000 Albany Pepsi Arena
September 24, 2000 Toronto Canada Air Canada Centre
September 26, 2000
September 28, 2000 Montreal Molson Centre
September 30, 2000 Pittsburgh United States Mellon Arena
October 1, 2000 Uniondale Nassau Veterans Memorial Coliseum
October 4, 2000 Chicago United Center
October 6, 2000 Cleveland Quicken Loans Arena
October 7, 2000 Washington, D.C. MCI Center
October 8, 2000 Raleigh Raleigh Entertainment & Sports Arena
October 11, 2000 Greenville BI-LO Center
October 13, 2000 Charlotte Charlotte Coliseum
October 14, 2000 Atlanta Philips Arena
October 15, 2000 Orlando TD Waterhouse Centre
October 18, 2000 Sunrise National Car Rental Center
October 20, 2000 Nashville Gaylord Entertainment Center
October 21, 2000 Birmingham BJCC Arena
October 22, 2000 Knoxville Thompson–Boling Arena
October 25, 2000 New Orleans New Orleans Arena
October 27, 2000 Austin Frank Erwin Center
October 28, 2000 Dallas Reunion Arena
October 29, 2000 Houston Compaq Center
November 1, 2000 Columbus Nationwide Arena
November 3, 2000 Lexington Rupp Arena
November 4, 2000 Dayton Nutter Center
November 5, 2000 Detroit Joe Louis Arena
November 9, 2000 Fargo Fargodome
November 10, 2000 Ames Hilton Coliseum
November 11, 2000 Minneapolis Target Center
November 14, 2000 Denver Pepsi Center
November 16, 2000 San Jose San Jose Arena
November 17, 2000 Los Angeles Staples Center
November 18, 2000 Las Vegas MGM Grand Garden Arena
November 19, 2000
November 22, 2000 Portland Rose Garden
November 24, 2000 Edmonton Canada Skyreach Centre
November 25, 2000 Calgary Pengrowth Saddledome
November 27, 2000 Vancouver General Motors Place
November 29, 2000 Seattle United States KeyArena
December 1, 2000 Oakland The Arena in Oakland
December 2, 2000 Reno Lawlor Events Center
December 3, 2000 Bakersfield Centennial Garden Arena
December 5, 2000 Phoenix America West Arena
December 6, 2000 Anaheim Arrowhead Pond of Anaheim
Cancellations and rescheduled shows
September 29, 2000 University Park, Pennsylvania Bryce Jordan Center Cancelled due to scheduling conflict
October 12, 2000 Charlotte, North Carolina Charlotte Coliseum This performance was moved to October 13, 2000
October 13, 2000 Greenville, South Carolina BI-LO Arena This performance was moved to October 11, 2000
December 1, 2000 Bakersfield, California Centennial Gardens Arena This performance was moved to December 3, 2000.
December 2, 2000 San Diego, California San Diego Sports Arena
December 3, 2000 Anaheim, California Arrowhead Pond of Anaheim This performance was moved to December 6, 2000
December 6, 2000 Phoenix, Arizona America West Arena This performance was moved to December 5, 2000
December 8, 2000 Reno, Nevada Lawlor Events Center This performance was moved to December 2, 2000
December 9, 2000 Nampa, Idaho Idaho Center
December 16, 2000 Honolulu, Hawaii Aloha Stadium

Box office score data[edit]

Venue City Tickets Sold / Available Gross Revenue
Allstate Arena Rosemont 25,469 / 25,469 (100%) $1,778,830[11][12]
The Palace of Auburn Hills Auburn Hills 29,922 / 29,922 (100%) $1,820,889[11][13]
Greensboro Coliseum Greensboro 14,049 / 14,049 (100%) $908,709[14]
Madison Square Garden New York City 29,117 / 29,962 (97%) $2,489,681[15]
HSBC Arena Buffalo 11,964 / 11,964 (100%) $751,016[14]
Ice Palace Tampa 14,254 / 15,109 (94%) $751,016[16]
New Orleans Arena New Orleans 13,211 / 14,080 (94%) $931,935[16]
Reunion Arena Dallas 26,592 / 27,750 (96%) $1,701,133[16][17]
Alamodome San Antonio 20,116 / 21,196 (95%) $1,142,610[16]
America West Arena Phoenix 23,650 / 24,908 (95%) $1,716,431[18][19]
San Diego Sports Arena San Diego 10,219 / 11,664 (88%) $582,900[20]
Arrowhead Pond of Anaheim Anaheim 37,344 / 37,344 (100%) $2,303,155[18][19]
Van Andel Arena Grand Rapids 11,791 / 12,420 (95%) $621,589[20]
Tacoma Dome Tacome 19,582 / 20,202 (97%) $1,191,311[18]
General Motors Place Vancouver 14,297 / 14,297 (100%) $768,540[20]
Kemper Arena Kansas City 14,698 / 15,048 (98%) $847,994[20]
MARK of the Quad Cities Moline 10,551 / 10,551 (100%) $679,595[20]
Kiel Center St. Louis 15,147 / 20,226 (75%) $907,284[20]
Bradley Center Milwaukee 14,023 / 17,784 (79%) $853,893[21]
Conseco Fieldhouse Indianapolis 12,871 / 13,460 (96%) $803,000[21]
FleetCenter Boston 27,926 / 27,926 (100%) $1,926,240[13]
Nissan Pavilion at Stone Ridge Bristow 20,032 / 22,549 (89%) $963,282[22]
Continental Airlines Arena East Rutherford 27,584 / 34,398 (80%) $1,745,015[22]
Olympic Stadium Berlin 48,977 / 48,977 (100%) $1,858,172[23]
Munich 73,920 / 73,920 (100%) $2,776,840[23]
Werchter Festival Grounds Werchter 72,820 / 72,820 (100%) $2,522,633[23]
Waldstadion Frankfurt 51,460 / 51,460 (100%) $1,926,238[23]
Müngersdorfer Stadion Cologne 60,288 / 60,288 (100%) $2,106,688[23]
Parken Stadium Copenhagen 45,843 / 45,843 (100%) $2,357,824[23]
Valle Hovin Oslo 30,604 / 30,604 (100%) $1,362,448[24]
Ullevi Gothenburg 55,180 / 55,180 (100%) $2,415,729[23]
Helsinki Olympic Stadium Helsinki 42,021 / 42,021 (100%) $1,936,731[23]
First Union Center Philadelphia 11,514 / 15,000 (77%) $865,609[25]
Pepsi Arena Albany 12,318 / 12,318 (100%) $857,812[25]
Air Canada Centre Toronto 29,900 / 29,900 (100%) $1,587,361[26][27]
Molson Centre Montreal 14,312 / 14,312 (100%) $784,551[28]
BI-LO Center Greenville 10,951 / 10,951 (100%) $722,857[27]
Charlotte Coliseum Charlotte 12,107 / 16,966 (71%) $854,927[29]
Frank Erwin Center Austin 12,519 / 12,519 (100%) $805,051[30]
Nutter Center Dayton 11,027 / 11,027 (100%) $686,459[29]
Target Center Minneapolis 13,298 / 13,298 (100%) $843,327[17]
Staples Center Los Angeles 13,652 / 13,652 (100%) $1,077,634[31]
Centennial Garden Arena Bakersfield 8,584 / 8,584 (100%) $594,792[32]
TOTAL 1,075,704 / 1,111,898 (97%) $57,209,202

Critical reception[edit]

Josh L. Dickey (Spartanburg Herald Journal) praised the tour, stating, "'In fact, the only low points came during Turner's protracted absences for outfit changes, when the backing crew was forced to carry the show. Minus Turner's soaring vocals—which cut sharply though the Target Center's infamously muddy acoustic chamber—the band seemed awkward and cursory.[33]

Mark Brown (Rocky Mountain News) gave the performance at the Pepsi Center an "A", citing "From minute one, Turner bursts onto the stage with energy and finesse that only the Queen will process. Belting out her memorable hits, Turner proves it doesn't take media trickery to have success. She may be rolling down the river but Turner is creating an untouchable path. "[34]

Martine Bury (VIBE) praised Turner's performance at the Allstate Arena, "From her signature rendition of Creedence Clearwater Revival's 'Proud Mary' to the way she heats up dance floors with her most recent single, 'When the Heartache is Over' that sultry, gravelly voice tells ardent stories like no other."[35]

Broadcasts and recordings[edit]

The opening night of the tour at the Target Center in Minneapolis, Minnesota, aired live on VH1's Opening Night Live on March 23, 2000. The concert at the Sopot Hippodrom aired on TVP1 on August 15, 2000. An additional television broadcast aired on BBC Three. The concert footage was filmed at the Oakland Arena performance on May 8, 2000. The performances filmed at the Wembley Stadium were lated used for the DVD release in 2001. The DVD was certified platinum in the US and UK.

Personnel[edit]

  • Production Manager: Jake Berry
  • Lighting Designer: Roy Benney
  • Video Director: Christina Strand
  • FOH Sound Engineer: Dave Natale
  • Lighting Director: Jeff Pavey
Band
  • Drums: Jack Bruno
  • Piano: Joel Campbell
  • Supporting vocals: Joel Campbell, Ollie Marland, John Miles, John Ralston
  • Keyboards: Euge Groove and Ollie Marland
  • Saxophone: Euge Groove
  • Percussions: Euge Groove
  • Bass guitar: Warren McRae
  • Guitar: John Miles and James Ralston
  • Harmonica: John Miles
  • Backing vocals: Stacey Campbell, Solange Guniere, Lisa Fischer (EU/NA-II), Gloria Reuben (NA-I) and Claire Louise Turton
  • Dancers: Stacey Campbell, Solange Guniere, Lisa Fischer (EU/NA-II), Gloria Reuben (NA-I) and Claire Louise Turton

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Evans, Rob (2000-02-02). "First Dates Confirmed For Tina Turner's Final Tour". LiveDaily. Retrieved 2010-09-10. 
  2. ^ "ER nurse is semi-Private Dancer". Toronto Sun (Sun Media). 2000-05-10. p. D2. 
  3. ^ Hiatt, Brian (2000-12-28). "Tina Turner, 'NSYNC Had Year's Top-Grossing Tours". MTV News. MTV Networks. Retrieved 2010-09-10. 
  4. ^ a b "Tina Turner Bids Farewell". CBS News. CBS Interactive Inc. 2000-09-21. Retrieved 2010-09-10. 
  5. ^ a b c Evans, Rob (2000-07-06). "Tina Turner Mapes Second North American Leg". LiveDaily. Retrieved 2010-09-10. 
  6. ^ Lampert-Greaux, Elllen (2000-07-01). "Preaching to the Converted: Tina Turner Roars Back on Tour". Live Design. Penton Media, Inc. Retrieved 2010-09-10. 
  7. ^ "Tina Turner 24-7 World Tour Stage". Retrieved 2010-09-10. 
  8. ^ a b "Lionel Richie Joins Tina Turner Tour". NY Rocks. 2000-03-23. Retrieved 2010-09-10. 
  9. ^ MacDonald, Patrick (2000-05-12). "At 60, Tina Turner is still going strong on her last arena tour". The Seattle Times. The Seattle Times Company. Retrieved 2010-09-10. 
  10. ^ a b c Comerford, Will (2000-02-08). "Tina Turner Ready to Shake Up Stage One Last Time". VH1 News. MTV Networks. Retrieved 2010-09-10. 
  11. ^ a b "AB Top 10 Concert Gross". Billboard Magazine (Billboard Music Group, Inc.) 112 (15): 16. 2000-04-08. Retrieved 2010-09-15. 
  12. ^ "AB Top 10 Concert Gross". Billboard Magazine (Billboard Music Group, Inc.) 112 (24): 14. 2000-06-10. Retrieved 2010-09-15. 
  13. ^ a b "AB Top 10 Concert Gross". Billboard Magazine (Billboard Music Group, Inc.) 112 (27): 14. 2000-07-01. Retrieved 2010-09-15. 
  14. ^ a b "AB Top 10 Concert Gross". Billboard Magazine (Billboard Music Group, Inc.) 112 (17): 14. 2000-04-22. Retrieved 2010-09-15. 
  15. ^ "AB Top 10 Concert Gross". Billboard Magazine (Billboard Music Group, Inc.) 112 (18). 2000-04-29. Retrieved 2010-09-15. 
  16. ^ a b c d "AB Top 10 Concert Gross". Billboard Magazine (Billboard Music Group, Inc.) 112 (20): 18. 2000-05-13. Retrieved 2010-09-15. 
  17. ^ a b "AB Top 10 Concert Gross". Billboard Magazine (Billboard Music Group, Inc.) 112 (48): 18. 2000-11-25. Retrieved 2010-09-15. 
  18. ^ a b c "AB Top 10 Concert Gross". Billboard Magazine (Billboard Music Group, Inc.) 112 (22): 18. 2000-05-27. Retrieved 2010-09-15. 
  19. ^ a b "AB Top 10 Concert Gross". Billboard Magazine (Billboard Music Group, Inc.) 112 (53): 24. 2000-12-30. Retrieved 2010-09-15. 
  20. ^ a b c d e f "AB Top 10 Concert Gross". Billboard Magazine (Billboard Music Group, Inc.) 112: 18. 2000-06-03. Retrieved 2010-09-15. 
  21. ^ a b "AB Top 10 Concert Gross". Billboard Magazine (Billboard Music Group, Inc.) 112 (25): 22. 2000-06-17. Retrieved 2010-09-15. 
  22. ^ a b "AB Top 10 Concert Gross". Billboard Magazine (Billboard Music Group, Inc.) 112 (28): 14. 2000-07-08. Retrieved 2010-09-15. 
  23. ^ a b c d e f g h "AB Top 10 Concert Gross". Billboard Magazine (Billboard Music Group, Inc.) 112 (37): 18. 2000-09-09. Retrieved 2010-09-15. 
  24. ^ "AB Top 10 Concert Gross". Billboard Magazine (Billboard Music Group, Inc.) 112 (28): 20. 2000-09-16. Retrieved 2010-09-15. 
  25. ^ a b "AB Top 10 Concert Gross". Billboard Magazine (Billboard Music Group, Inc.) 112 (41): 14. 2000-10-07. Retrieved 2010-09-15. 
  26. ^ "AB Top 10 Concert Gross". Billboard Magazine (Billboard Music Group, Inc.) 112 (42): 20. 2000-10-14. Retrieved 2010-09-15. 
  27. ^ a b "AB Top 10 Concert Gross". Billboard Magazine (Billboard Music Group, Inc.) 112 (44): 20. 2000-10-28. Retrieved 2010-09-15. 
  28. ^ "AB Top 10 Concert Gross". Billboard Magazine (Billboard Music Group, Inc.) 112 (43): 14. 2000-10-21. Retrieved 2010-09-15. 
  29. ^ a b "AB Top 10 Concert Gross". Billboard Magazine (Billboard Music Group, Inc.) 112 (47): 18. 2000-11-18. Retrieved 2010-09-15. 
  30. ^ "AB Top 10 Concert Gross". Billboard Magazine (Billboard Music Group, Inc.) 112 (46): 22. 2000-11-11. Retrieved 2010-09-15. 
  31. ^ "AB Top 10 Concert Gross". Billboard Magazine (Billboard Music Group, Inc.) 112 (50): 28. 2000-12-09. Retrieved 2010-09-15. 
  32. ^ "AB Top 10 Concert Gross". Billboard Magazine (Billboard Music Group, Inc.) 112 (51): 22. 2000-12-16. Retrieved 2010-09-15. 
  33. ^ Dickey, Josh L. "Tina Turner turns back the clock in tour's opener". Spartanburg Herald Journal (The New York Times Company). Associated News. p. D6. 
  34. ^ Brown, Mark (2000-05-18). "Turner, Richie pull no punches in KO performances". Denver Newspaper Agency. 
  35. ^ Bury, Martine. "Electric Ladyland". Vibe Magazine (Vibe Media Group) 8 (5): 98. Retrieved 2010-09-10. 

External links[edit]