Twice Upon a Rhyme

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Twice Upon a Rhyme
Studio album by Paul Levinson with Ed Fox and Peter Rosenthal
Released 1972
Recorded 1969-1971 at various studios in New York
Genre Folk-rock, Psych folk
Length 51:05
Label HappySad Records
Producer Paul Levinson and Ed Fox
20 second sample from Twice Upon a Rhyme

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Twice Upon a Rhyme is an LP record by Paul Levinson with Ed Fox and Peter Rosenthal. It was released in 1972 by HappySad Records on vinyl.[1]

Twice Upon a Rhyme was recorded on and off from 1969 to 1971.[2] It includes all original material by Paul Levinson writing solo and with collaborating writers.[3] Levinson is the featured artist, with Ed Fox and Peter Rosenthal. (Boris Midney, Don Frankel, Jay Sackett, Mitch Greenberg, Alan Fuhr and Jesse Stiller also performed on the album.)[4] The album was produced by Paul Levinson and Ed Fox. Twice Upon a Rhyme was a small pressing distributed around the country. It received some airplay, but did not break out as a hit and remained in obscurity until thirty years later, when the album began showing up from time to time on cult collectors' lists of 1960s music, with copies appearing on eBay occasionally, and accumulating fans among European and American collectors.[2][5]

The July 2002 issue of Japan's Record Collector magazine featured Twice Upon a Rhyme in its roundup of American 1960s "Psychedelic Movements". The reviewer, Taro Miyasugi, said, "It's human mystical pop music... wonderful songs."[6]

The album is included in Hans Pokora's book, 4001 Record Collector Dreams,[7] Patrick Lundborg's Acid Archives,[8] and Vernon Joynson's Fuzz Acid and Flowers Revisited.[2]

Twice Upon a Rhyme was re-issued in remastered vinyl by Whiplash/Sound of Salvation Records in the United Kingdom in 2010. [9]

Track listing[edit]

  1. "Today Is Just Like You" (Levinson)
  2. "Looking For Sunsets (In The Early Morning)" (Levinson/Fox)
  3. "Gentle Blue Cherry Bell" (Levinson/Fox)
  4. "I'm Seeing You In A Different Light" (Levinson/Fox)
  5. "Learn To Learn" (Levinson/Fox)
  6. "Looks Like A Night (I Won't Catch Much Sleep In)" (Levinson/Fox)
  7. "Raincheck" (Levinson/Fox)
  8. "You Are Everywhere" (Levinson/Kaley)
  9. "Forever Friday" (Levinson/Fox)
  10. "The Soft Of Your Eyes" (Levinson)
  11. "Antique Shop (The Coming Of Winter)" (Levinson/Rosenthal)
  12. "Not Yet Ready To Say Goodbye" (Levinson/Kaplan)
  13. "The Lama Will Be Late This Year" (Levinson/Fox)

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Happysad debuts its first album". Billboard. September 30, 1972. Retrieved 30 August 2013. 
  2. ^ a b c Joynson, Vernon (2005-01-01). Fuzz Acid and Flowers Revisited: Comprehensive Guide to American Garage Psychedelic and Hippie Rock (1964-1975) (hardcover ed.). Borderline Productions. p. 250. ISBN 1-899855-14-9. "A local New York private pressing recorded between July 1969 and October 1971. At their best, Levinson and his crew produce dark, druggy pop music remindful of neighbors The Patron Saints or bayou obscuros Feather Da Gamba. "Forever Friday", "Looking For Sunsets" and "You Are Everywhere" fit this profile. "The Lama Will Be Late This Year" is probably the most intriguing cut on the album, having as it does an oddly Syd Barrett-like delivery of the lyrics and some pretty unorthodox music with fuzz guitar leads." 
  3. ^ Levinson, Paul (2008-12-03). "Lyrics to Paul Levinson's Twice Upon a Rhyme, 1972". InfiniteRegress.tv. Retrieved 27 December 2009. 
  4. ^ "Paul Levinson: Pop Folk Rock Psychedelic Music, Lyrics, Songs, and Videos". ReverbNation. Retrieved 1 January 2011. 
  5. ^ "Twice Upon a Rhyme". rateyourmusic.com. December 2009. Retrieved 27 December 2009. 
  6. ^ Miyasugi, Taro. "Review of Twice Upon a Rhyme". Record Collector, July 2002, p.85.
  7. ^ Pokora, Hans (2006). 4001 Record Collector Dreams. 
  8. ^ Lundborg, Patrick; Aaron Milenski and Ron Moore (2006). Acid Archives A Guide to Underground Sounds 1965-1982. Lysergia. p. 300. ISBN 91-976523-0-X. 
  9. ^ Mathews, Austin. "Twice Upon a Rhyme". Shindig, January-February 2011. "Superb fuzz guitar irresistibly drizzled across several tracks ... a memorable personality indelibly locked inside the grooves ... the perfect sound track for a lethargic spring day."