Two Sevens Clash

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Two Sevens Clash
Studio album by Culture
Released 1977
Recorded Joe Gibbs Recording Studio, Kingston, 1976
Genre Reggae
Length 33:14
Label Joe Gibbs
Producer Joe Gibbs
Culture chronology
Two Sevens Clash
(1977)
Baldhead Bridge
(1978)
Professional ratings
Review scores
Source Rating
Allmusic 5/5 stars[1]
Pitchfork Media (9.0/10)[2]
Robert Christgau A+[3]
Rolling Stone 5/5 stars[4]

Two Sevens Clash is the debut album by roots reggae band Culture, recorded with producer Joe Gibbs at his own Joe Gibbs Recording Studio in Kingston in 1976, and released on Gibbs' eponymous label in 1977 (see 1977 in music). The album's title is a reference to the date of July 7, 1977.

Singer Joseph Hill said "Two Sevens Clash," Culture's most influential record, was based on a prediction by Marcus Garvey, who said there would be chaos on July 7, 1977, when the "sevens" met. With its apocalyptic message, the song created a stir in his Caribbean homeland and many Jamaican businesses and schools shuttered their doors for the day.[5][6]

The liner notes of the album read: "One day Joseph Hill had a vision, while riding a bus, of 1977 as a year of judgment -- when two sevens clash -- when past injustices would be avenged. Lyrics and melodies came into his head as he rode and thus was born the song "Two Sevens Clash" which became a massive hit in reggae circles both in Jamaica and abroad. The prophecies noted by the lyrics so profoundly captured the imagination of the people that on July 7, 1977 - the day when sevens fully clashed (seventh day, seventh month, seventy-seventh year) a hush descended on Kingston; many people did not go outdoors, shops closed, an air of foreboding and expectation filled the city."

The album was reissued in 1988 with different cover art.

Track listing[edit]

  1. "Calling Rasta Far I" – 2:30
  2. "I'm Alone in the Wilderness" – 3:25
  3. "Pirate Days" – 2:52
  4. "Two Sevens Clash" – 3:30
  5. "I'm Not Ashamed" – 3:59
  6. "Get Ready to Ride the Lion to Zion" – 3:27
  7. "Black Starliner Must Come" – 2:42
  8. "Jah Pretty Face" – 3:39
  9. "See Them a Come" – 3:24
  10. "Natty Dread Taking Over" – 3:46

Personnel[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Allmusic review
  2. ^ Pitchfork Media review
  3. ^ Robert Christgau review
  4. ^ Rolling Stone review
  5. ^ "Birth of a Phenomenon: 'Two Sevens Clash'". National Public Radio. July 12, 2007. Retrieved 2007-06-21. "The title refers to apocalyptic prophecies by Marcus Garvey" 
  6. ^ "Culture Leader Joseph Hill Dies In Berlin". Billboard. August 21, 2006. Retrieved 2007-06-21. "Hill said "Two Sevens Clash," Culture's most influential record, was based on a prediction by Pan-Africanist Marcus Garvey, who said there would be chaos on July 7, 1977, when the "sevens" met. With its apocalyptic message, the song created a stir in his Caribbean homeland and many Jamaican businesses and schools shut their doors for the day."