Tydd St Giles

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Tydd St Giles
Tydd St Giles is located in Cambridgeshire
Tydd St Giles
Tydd St Giles
 Tydd St Giles shown within Cambridgeshire
Population 603 
OS grid reference TF424168
Shire county Cambridgeshire
Region East
Country England
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Post town Wisbech
Dialling code 01945
EU Parliament East of England
List of places
UK
England
Cambridgeshire

Coordinates: 52°44′N 0°07′E / 52.73°N 0.11°E / 52.73; 0.11

Tydd St. Giles is a village in Cambridgeshire, England. It was founded in the late 1000s with the building of the church of St. Giles in 1084 on a natural rise in the land of the Fens. The church itself is built of Barnack stone, known to be the gift of the Bishop of Peterborough.

The name 'Tydd' is known to derive from a corruption of the word "Tide",[1] as the village was home to an important sluice used for draining the Fens. Although many Fenland names derive from Anglo Saxon words, a few scattered around Wisbech include Anglo Saxon words referencing the native British population. Even though the village is old enough, it does not appear in the Domesday Book, because the village was in the liberty of the Bishop of Ely.[2]

It is the northernmost village in Cambridgeshire (bordering Lincolnshire), on the same latitude as Midlands towns such as Loughborough, Leicestershire and Shrewsbury, Shropshire. The village is in the distribution area of one local free newspaper, The Fenland Citizen.

Geography[edit]

The village is completely low-lying, with an average altitude of 0 metres.[3] The village is roughly square shaped (formed by the four main roads of Church Lane, Hockland Road, High Broadgate and Newgate Road). The eastern side of the village is dominated by the Norman church. The western side of the village is dominated by the Community Centre, a large blue roofed barn-like structure.

The civil parish of Tydd St. Giles also includes the hamlets of Foul Anchor, and part of Tydd Gote which lies partly in Tydd St Giles[4] and partly in Tydd St Mary in Lincolnshire.[5] the village has no direct "A" road access, but is joined to the A1101 by the B1165. Tydd St. Giles is in the (old) Wisbech postal district, and is the northern-most settlement in Cambridgeshire, it is also the northern-most, and last, parish in the Diocese of Ely, this is enhanced by the fact that the traditional county and diocesan bound is Eau Dyke, to the north of the village.

Eau dyke is the only natural watercourse in the village, as it follows the course of the old Cat River. Across the southern boundary of the village runs a part of the North Level Main Drain, the drain is a vital part to the draining and continuing existence of the Fens, the drain then joins the River Nene at Foul Anchor, after passing through a pumping station, that brings the water up to the level of the river.

Although the village is officially recorded at an altitude of 0 metres, the age of the settlement, and the vowels "i" and "y" in the village name suggest that it stands on a low mound that would have been above the surface of the fen. It is certain that the village was inhabitable before the 16th and 17th Century draining of the fen, because of the age of the church.

A survey of 1868 described it thus: TYDD ST. GILES, a parish in the hundred of Wisbech, Isle of Ely, county Cambridge, 5 miles north-west of Wisbech, its post town, and 6 from St. Mary Sutton. The preparation of woad for dyeing is carried on. The construction of the Bedford Level canal, which is 100 feet wide and 30 feet deep, has greatly improved the quality of the land. The living is a rectory in the diocese of Ely, value £653, in the patronage of the bishop. The church is dedicated to St. Giles. The parochial charities produce about £80 per annum. There is an endowed school, and the Independents have a chapel.[6]

Politics[edit]

The village is in the North East Cambridgeshire constituency and is represented in Parliament by Mr. Steve Barclay MP (Conservative), he stood in the 2010 General Election after the retirement of Malcolm Moss (Conservative). The village Polling Station is in the Community Centre to the west of the village.

In local politics the village is in Roman Bank - Wisbech Ward of Fenland District Council. The councillors for Roman Bank are: Councillor Phillip Hatton (Conservative), Planning and Staff committees Chairman, Councillor Michael J. Humphrey (Conservative), and Duputy Leader Councillor Christopher J. Seaton (Conservative), portfolio holder for open business. On 5 May 2011 there was a local election, the ward recorded no change.[7]

St. Giles Church[edit]

The Norman church dedicated to St. Giles, dominates the eastern side of the village. The church, although extensively redesigned in the 1800s (see below), still retains its Norman architecture and feel. The West Window was designed by Alan of Walsingham, the designer of the famous "octagon" lantern on Ely Cathedral, this rare clear glass medieval window (which survived the depredations of Oliver Cromwell) fills the whole of the western end of the building. All of the woodwork and pews in the church are later Victorian additions.

In the Lady Chapel there are still some remnants of the church's original medieval stained glass, the rest of the church's stained glass is Victorian. The East Window shows the life and passion of Christ, while the North-Western Window depicts the church's (and village's) patron saint, Saint Giles and St. Paul (one of the patrons of the Church of Ss. Peter & Paul in Wisbech).

The outer southern wall of the church still has the remains of a medieval sundial, which was in use when the church was a cell of the priory in Wisbech.

The Tower

The church is one of the few in the area to have a separate tower. The tower fell away from the eastern end of the church in the 18th century (due to poor foundations and strong wind), and was rebuilt by Sir George Gilbert Scott when the building was extensively renovated in the 1880s. Local legend has it that the tower was pushed over by the devil, as he could not abide the sound of the church bells. The tower has a ring of six bells with a tenor weight of 8-2-8cwt tuned to A.[8] The bells were recast for the golden jubilee of Queen Victoria, from the original ring of 5, six bells were cast. The bells hang in a wooden frame, and are rung in the traditional English full circle ringing system.

Renovation by Sir George Gilbert Scott

In the 1880s the church was renovated by the famous architect and designer of the "K" Class red telephone boxes, Sir George Gilbert Scott. The church was shortened, where the collapse of the tower had destroyed the original sanctuary (The east wall of the building still has the original blank arch). The nave roof was built up to its present level, and a new clerestorey was installed—the original can still be seen on the inside where the builders filled the Norman windows. The side aisles were also extended and the roof was re-leaded. The original plans, drawn by Scott can be seen on display at the back of the church, where they are now displayed after being found in a drawer in the church vestry.

Repairs to the roof

The church's roof was repaired in 2001–2002, as the original Victorian tiling and structure had decayed, letting in rain water along the whole of the nave and the side aisles. At the request of English Nature (now Natural England) the woodwork in the new rooves had holes bored into them to allow the resident colony of pipistrelle bats in and out of the building. The nave roof was blessed by the Right Rev'd Anthony Russell (retired) Bishop of Ely and Lord Spiritual, and the then incumbent of the parish, Rev'd Nigel Whitehouse, the roof was baptised using a bottle of specially brewed ale by Elgood & Sons Ltd., called Tydd St. Tiles.

Other Items of Interest

The Church has a copy of the Coventry Cross of Nails hanging in the sanctuary.

The church also has a (tentative) claim to having had a pope in the parish. It is believed that Nicholas Brakespeare (Pope Adrian IV) was a curate of the parish. As a consequence the local pub is called the 'Crown and Mitre'.

The parish is the owner of a rare Elizabethan chalice, gifted to the church by the then lord of the manor. It is inscribed: "A gift for Tedd sent Gyles". The chalice is only used by the church on special occasions, and when not in use is kept under lock-and-key in a local bank vault.

The church has a restored Victorian bier, found and restored by a parishioner. The original wooden framework ond cast iron suspension units were in rescuable condition upon its discovery, but the wheels were made by a local smith, and the side rails are in fact lengths of copper heating pipes.

Parish Priests
  • 2005 – present Rev'd Sandra Gardner
  • 1998–2004 Rev'd Nigel Whitehouse (promoted)
  • –1998 Rev'd Richard (Jack) Tofts (retired)
  • 1320 Nicholas de Houton (first rector)[9]

The War Memorial[edit]

The War Memorial for the parish of Tydd St. Giles and Foul Anchor records the details of 15 men who fell in the Great War (12), the Second World War (3), and in Northern Ireland (1).

The Great War

The men are recorded as "Fallen from this parish in the Great Wars 1914–18 and 1939–1945"

  • Sidney Aubin - Of the King's Royal Rifles (A/200552 - Rifleman), died of his wounds on 25 March 1918. His remains lie in the Roye New British Cemetery, Somme, France.
  • Hugh Clark - Of the 1st Battalion, Bedfordshire Regiment (26310 - Private), killed in action 25th OCtober 1917. His remains were never recovered and he is remembered on the memorial wall in Tyne Cot.
  • Richard Herbert Clarke - Of the 6th Battalion, Royal Berkshire Regiment (Princess Charlotte of Wales) (36544 - Private), died of his wounds on 11 March 1917. His remains lie in the Pozières British Cemetery, Somme, France the site of the Pozières Memorial.
  • Harry Cragg - Of the 6th Battalion, Lincolnshire Regiment (15760 - Private), killed in action on 28 November 1915, at Kirtech Tepe Sirt, in the Suvla sector at the Battle of Gallipoli. His remains lie in the Azmack Cemetery, Suvla, Gallipoli, Turkey.
  • John William Fincham - Of the 11th Battalion, Suffolk Regiment (20755 - Lance-Corporal), killed in action on 1 July 1916. His remains lie in Ovillers Military Cemetery, France.
  • Arthur Godfrey - Of the 7th Battalion, Bedfordshire Regiment (15325 - Private), killed in action on 1 July 1916. His remains were never recovered and is remembered on the Thiepval Memorial.
  • Frederick Godfrey - Of the 8th Battalion, Suffolk Regiment (25064 - Private), killed in action on 12 November 1916. His remains lie in Regina Trench Cemetery, Somme, France.
  • William Harry Godfrey - Of the 5th Battalion, Machine Gun Corps (148824 - Private), killed in action on 29 May 1918, he was awarded the Military Medal. His remains lie in the Tannay British Cemetery, Thiennes.
  • Arthur George Groves - Of the 7th Battalion, Suffolk Regiment (26746 - Private), killed in action on 9 August 1918. His remains were never recovered, he is remembered on the Thiepval Memorial.
  • Amos Hill - Of the 10th Battalion, Canadians (886424 - Private), killed in action on 11 November 1917 at the Battle of Passchendaele. His remains lie in the Passchendaele New British Cemetery, Belgium.
  • Alfred William Monckton - Of the 1st Battalion, Queen's Own Royal West Kent Regiment (L/7158 - Private), he died on 22 March 1915. His remains were never recovered, he is remembered on the Menin Gate Memorial, Ieper (Ypres), Belgium.
  • Harry Smith - Of the 7th Battalion, Bedfordshire Regiment (15272 - Private), killed in action on 1 July 1916. his remains were never recovered and he is remembered on the Thiepval Memorial.
  • Arthur Biss - Of the D Company, 9th Battalion, Norfolk Regiment (14568 - Private), killed in action on 26 September 1915. His remains were never recovered and he is remembered on the Loos Memorial, Pas-de-Calais, France.
  • Herbert F. Brown - Of the 4th Suffolk Regiment (Private), Gassed.
  • Walter James Green - Of the 1st Battalion, Lincolnshire Regiment (9452 - Private), killed in action on 14 September 1914. His remains were never recovered, he is remembered on the La Ferté-sous-Jouarre memorial.
  • Jesse T. Holmes - Of the 11th Battalion, Suffolk Regiment (24068 - Private), died of his wounds on 30 November 1916. His remains lie in the Trois Arbres Cemetery, Steenwerck, Belgium.
  • Reuben Charles Kettle - Of the SS (MPS) Westergate, Royal Navy (LZ5581 - Gunner), ship torpedoed on 21 April 1918. His remains lie in Gefossen Churchyard.
  • Harry Rowell - Of the 9th Battalion, Norfolk Regiment (15272 - Private), killed in action on 15 September 1916. His remains were never recovered and he is remembered on the Thiepval Memorial.
  • Fred Wells - Of the 21st Light Railway Operating Company, Royal Engineers (256806 - Sapper), killed in action on 20 October 1917. His remains lie in the Reninghelst New Military Cemetery, Belgium.
The Second World War
  • Charles T. Clfton - Details unsure, died 1942.
  • Bernard Raymond Pentelow - Of the 287 Field Company, Royal Engineers (2090367 - Sapper), died as Prisoner of War on 9 October 1943. His remains lie in Thanbyuzayat War Cemetery, Myanmar (Burma). He is also remembered in the church on a plaque on the eastern wall.
  • R. Henry Wright - Details unsure, died 1943.
Northern Ireland

Brigstock and Wren Charity[edit]

The village is home to a local charity, Brigstock & Wren (B&W). B&W was recognised as a charity in 1910, to help people in the parish. At the time of the charity's founding it managed 29 acres (12 ha) of land and three cottages in Tydd St. Giles, B&W also controlled 12 acres (5 ha) of land in Sutton St. Edmund. The aid from B&W generally comes in the form of money, although sometimes items will be bought for applicants considered worthy of aid. The committee of B&W consists mostly of local landowners, all elected by the wider membership. The parish priest is an ex officio member of the committee.

B&W was originated in the British attack on the Dutch in Sole Bay in 1672. One of the officers involved was Matthew Wren, son of the Bishop of Ely. In his will (written just before the attack), Wren left 15 acres (6 ha) of Low Marsh to the poor of the village. By 1837, the Charities Commissioners also acknowledged that John Brigstock had left land to the poor in 1667, although Brigstock never owned the land. He had merely controlled the land for an older charity (whose name is now lost), and his name was on the deeds[12]

Tydd Steam Brewery[edit]

The village is home to a micro-brewery, Tydd Steam. The brewery was founded in 2007 by Will and Anna Neavson. The newly installed plant is capable of producing 5 barrels per brew. The Brewery is situated in a renovated and converted barn. The barn was used as a garage for two steam tractors that were used by the farm. The tractors are now kept in the Museum of Lincolnshire Life in Lincoln.[13] Tydd Steam's Armageddon ale was awarded a bronze medal at the CAMRA Peterborough Beer Festival in 2008.[14][15]

Notable Buildings[edit]

The village has seven listed buildings in its "historic centre" (around Church Lane and Kirkgate).[16] Two of these are the Church and Tower. Also included are the "Old School", a Victorian primary school building and school master's house on Church Lane, which unfortunately has fallen into a state of considerable disrepair. The Old Tithe house (also on Church Lane) is a Grade I listed building, that formerly was part of the parish properties (and used as a parish hall). For centuries it was not used, but was bought by a local member of SPAB, and restored it to its former glory. The other notable building is the Grade 1 listed Elizabethan manor house (Tydd Manor).[17]

On Hockland Road is Paget Hall, a Grade II listed building. It was designed by Sir Gilbert Scott for his brother Rev'd Canon John Scott, then Rector of the parish. It was built around the same time as the church was renovated.[18]

Village Guilds[edit]

The village had three guilds: the Guild of our Lady (1350), the Guild of the Holy Cross (1385) and the Guild of St. Giles (1386).

The Guild of Our Lady

The Guild of Our Lady had a membership restricted to twelve brethren. It was founded by William Everswell, chaplain and Nicholas Clerk. The foundation of the guild also established a chaplaincy. by 1535 the value of the guild was valued at £4 13s 1d. The guild provided candles and torches for the icon of Our Lady in the church.

The Guild of the Holy Cross

The Guild of the Holy Cross had a chapel at Sea Gate, near the outfall of the North Level Main Drain (Then the Shire Drain).

The guild of St. Giles

The Guild of St. Giles, provided candles for the mass in the church. The membership was paid in bushels of barley. The members was also required to attend Vespers on the eve of St. Giles and mass on the feast day itself (1 September). The guild was also involved in charitable acts in the parish, being required to donate 1s 8d worth of bread to the poor after St. Giles' mass.

There was also a Guild of St. John, although no guild documentation exists. They may have met in a chapel by the Tritton (now Tretton) Bridge.[19]

Education[edit]

The village has a County Primary School, it was opened in the 1960s and in 1990 had 84 children on the school roll, with a capacity of 90.[20]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.fenland.gov.uk/assets/localplan/downloads/part2/Tydd%20St%20Giles/Tydd%20St%20Giles[1].pdf
  2. ^ A History of the County of Cambridge and the Isle of Ely: Volume 4: City of Ely: Ely N. and S. Witchford and the Wisbech Hundreds, Authors: R B Pugh (Editor), T D Atkinson, Ethel M Hampson, E T Long, C A F Meekings, Edward Miller, H B Wells, G M G Woodgate, Cambridge 2002 pp. 224–232
  3. ^ Ordnance Survey sheet No.131 (Boston and Spalding), Crown Copyright 1998
  4. ^ "Tydd St Giles". Vision of Britain. University of Portsmouth. Retrieved 19 August 2011. 
  5. ^ "Tydd St Mary". Vision of Britain. University of Portsmouth. Retrieved 19 August 2011. 
  6. ^ The National Gazetteer of Great Britain and Ireland, 1868
  7. ^ http://www.fenland.gov.uk/councillors
  8. ^ http://dove.cccbr.org.uk/detail.php?searchString=Tydd+St.+giles&DoveID=TYDD+ST+GI
  9. ^ A History of the County of Cambridge and the Isle of Ely: Volume 4: City of Ely: Ely N. and S. Witchford and the Wisbech Hundreds, Authors: R B Pugh (Editor), T D Atkinson, Ethel M Hampson, E T Long, C A F Meekings, Edward Miller, H B Wells, G M G Woodgate, Cambridge 2002 pp. 224–232
  10. ^ http://www.cwgc.org/search/
  11. ^ http://www.roll-of-honour.com/Cambridgeshire/TyddStGiles.html
  12. ^ A History of the County of Cambridge and the Isle of Ely: Volume 4: City of Ely: Ely N. and S. Witchford and the Wisbech Hundreds, Authors: R B Pugh (Editor), T D Atkinson, Ethel M Hampson, E T Long, C A F Meekings, Edward Miller, H B Wells, G M G Woodgate, Cambridge 2002 pp. 224–232
  13. ^ http://www.tyddsteam.co.uk/tydd.htm
  14. ^ "Tydd Steam Brewery". Retrieved 6 April 2011. 
  15. ^ http://www.peterborough-camra.org.uk/index.php?module=pbfawards&func=main&thisyear=2008
  16. ^ http://www.fenland.gov.uk/assets/localplan/downloads/part2/Tydd%20St%20Giles/Tydd%20St%20Giles[1].pdf
  17. ^ A History of the County of Cambridge and the Isle of Ely: Volume 4: City of Ely: Ely N. and S. Witchford and the Wisbech Hundreds, Authors: R B Pugh (Editor), T D Atkinson, Ethel M Hampson, E T Long, C A F Meekings, Edward Miller, H B Wells, G M G Woodgate, Cambridge 2002 pp. 224–232
  18. ^ http://www.britishlistedbuildings.co.uk/en-48150-paget-hall-tydd-st-giles
  19. ^ A History of the County of Cambridge and the Isle of Ely: Volume 4: City of Ely: Ely N. and S. Witchford and the Wisbech Hundreds, Authors: R B Pugh (Editor), T D Atkinson, Ethel M Hampson, E T Long, C A F Meekings, Edward Miller, H B Wells, G M G Woodgate, Cambridge 2002 pp. 224–232
  20. ^ http://www.fenland.gov.uk/assets/localplan/downloads/part2/Tydd%20St%20Giles/Tydd%20St%20Giles[1].pdf