1950–59 Pacific typhoon seasons

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from Typhoon Helene)
Jump to: navigation, search

The 1950s featured the 1950–59 Pacific typhoon seasons. The seasons had no official bounds, but most tropical cyclones tend to form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean between June and December. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean.

The scope of this article is limited to the Pacific Ocean, north of the equator and west of the international date line. Storms that form east of the date line and north of the equator are called hurricanes; see 1950-1959 Pacific hurricane seasons. Tropical storms formed in the entire west pacific basin were assigned a name by the North Pacific Typhoon Warning Service, Fleet Weather Center, or Joint Typhoon Warning Center.

Contents

Seasons[edit]

1950 Pacific typhoon season[edit]

Season summary

Severe Tropical Storm 01W[edit]

Severe tropical storm (CMA)
Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Duration April 12 – April 15
Peak intensity 110 km/h (70 mph) (10-min)  984 mbar (hPa)

Super Typhoon Doris[edit]

Category 4 super typhoon (SSHWS)
Duration May 6 – May 14
Peak intensity 240 km/h (150 mph) (1-min)  928 mbar (hPa)

Tropical Storm 02W[edit]

Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Duration June 5 – June 9
Peak intensity 65 km/h (40 mph) (1-min)  997 mbar (hPa)

Typhoon Elsie[edit]

Category 1 typhoon (SSHWS)
Duration June 23 – June 24
Peak intensity 140 km/h (85 mph) (1-min)  981 mbar (hPa)

CMA Severe Tropical Storm 6[edit]

Severe tropical storm (CMA)
Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Duration July 12 – July 15
Peak intensity 95 km/h (60 mph) (10-min)  990 mbar (hPa)

Tropical Storm Flossie[edit]

Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Duration July 15 – July 19
Peak intensity 110 km/h (70 mph) (1-min)  993 mbar (hPa)

Typhoon Grace[edit]

Category 1 typhoon (SSHWS)
Duration July 16 – July 21
Peak intensity 130 km/h (80 mph) (1-min)  981 mbar (hPa)

Tropical Storm Helene[edit]

Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Duration July 24 – August 3
Peak intensity 95 km/h (60 mph) (1-min)  991 mbar (hPa)

Tropical Storm 13W[edit]

Tropical storm (CMA)
Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Duration August 2 – August 4
Peak intensity 75 km/h (45 mph) (10-min)  992 mbar (hPa)

Tropical Storm 15W[edit]

Tropical storm (CMA)
Tropical depression (SSHWS)
Counterclockwise vortex
Duration August 3 – August 4
Peak intensity 75 km/h (45 mph) (10-min)  998 mbar (hPa)

Tropical Storm 16W[edit]

Tropical storm (CMA)
Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Counterclockwise vortex
Duration August 4 – August 6
Peak intensity 75 km/h (45 mph) (10-min)  996 mbar (hPa)

Typhoon Ida[edit]

Category 1 typhoon (SSHWS)
Duration August 9 – August 21
Peak intensity 140 km/h (85 mph) (1-min)  973 mbar (hPa)

Severe Tropical Storm 20W[edit]

Severe tropical storm (CMA)
Tropical depression (SSHWS)
Counterclockwise vortex
Duration August 10 – August 14
Peak intensity 95 km/h (60 mph) (10-min)  990 mbar (hPa)

Severe Tropical Storm Twenty one[edit]

Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Counterclockwise vortex
Duration August 11 – August 14
Peak intensity 110 km/h (70 mph) (1-min)  980 mbar (hPa)

Severe Tropical Storm 23W[edit]

Severe tropical storm (CMA)
Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Counterclockwise vortex
Duration August 14 – August 22
Peak intensity 110 km/h (70 mph) (10-min)  990 mbar (hPa)

Typhoon Jane[edit]

Category 3 typhoon (SSHWS)
Duration August 29 – September 4
Peak intensity 185 km/h (115 mph) (1-min)  943 mbar (hPa)

Typhoon Jane struck the island of Shikoku in Japan on the 3rd of September. Resulting flooding and landslides killed 539 people. [1]

In late August, a depression formed and quickly intensified into a tropical storm and was given the name Jane. The storm drifted west-northwestward and intensified into a typhoon. Jane gradually curved to the north and intensified to a category 2 typhoon. Jane shortly reached category 3 status and peak intensity at 185 kph (115 mph). The typhoon accelerated to the north-northeast and weakened to a category 2 storm and made landfall in the modern-day Osaka-Kobe-Kyoto area. Jane crossed Kyoto Prefecture and weakened to a tropical storm and crossed the Noto Peninsula and reentered the Sea of Japan and passed just west of Sado Island. The storm struck eastern Aomori Prefecture and crossed the Tsugaru Straits and made a final landfall on the south coast of Hokkaido Prefecture. Jane crossed Hokkaido and dissipated south of the Kuril Islands.

Typhoon Kezia[edit]

Category 3 typhoon (SSHWS)
Duration September 4 – September 15
Peak intensity 185 km/h (115 mph) (1-min)  945 mbar (hPa)

On September 13 Typhoon Kezia hit part of the fleet off Kyushu.

Severe Tropical Storm 26W[edit]

Severe tropical storm (CMA)
Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Counterclockwise vortex
Duration September 6 – September 8
Peak intensity 95 km/h (60 mph) (10-min)  995 mbar (hPa)

Tropical Storm Lucretia[edit]

Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Duration September 14 – September 19
Peak intensity 100 km/h (65 mph) (1-min)  987 mbar (hPa)

Tropical Storm Missatha[edit]

Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Duration September 13 – September 19
Peak intensity 100 km/h (65 mph) (1-min)  984 mbar (hPa)

Typhoon Ossia[edit]

Category 3 typhoon (SSHWS)
Duration September 27 – October 6
Peak intensity 185 km/h (115 mph) (1-min)  966 mbar (hPa)

Typhoon Petie[edit]

Category 2 typhoon (SSHWS)
Duration October 18 – October 24
Peak intensity 165 km/h (105 mph) (1-min)  978 mbar (hPa)

Severe Tropical Storm 25W[edit]

Severe tropical storm (CMA)
Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Counterclockwise vortex
Duration October 26 – October 31
Peak intensity 95 km/h (60 mph) (10-min)  995 mbar (hPa)

Typhoon Ruby[edit]

Category 3 typhoon (SSHWS)
Duration October 27 – October 31
Peak intensity 185 km/h (115 mph) (1-min)  918 mbar (hPa)

Typhoon Billie[edit]

Category 1 typhoon (SSHWS)
Duration November 4 – November 9
Peak intensity 150 km/h (90 mph) (1-min)  985 mbar (hPa)

Typhoon Clara[edit]

Category 4 typhoon (SSHWS)
Duration November 4 – November 13
Peak intensity 230 km/h (145 mph) (1-min)  899 mbar (hPa)

Tropical Storm Delilah[edit]

Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Duration November 19 – November 25
Peak intensity 110 km/h (70 mph) (1-min)  989 mbar (hPa)

Severe Tropical Storm Ellen[edit]

Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Duration December 11 – December 13
Peak intensity 105 km/h (65 mph) (1-min)  990 mbar (hPa)

Typhoon Fran[edit]

Category 1 typhoon (SSHWS)
Duration December 26 – January 1
Peak intensity 150 km/h (90 mph) (1-min)  980 mbar (hPa)

Typhoon Fran was a late season storm that struck the northern Philippines killing 5 people.[1]

1950 storm names[edit]

The names Delilah, Helene, Jane, Kezia, Lucretia, Missatha, Ossia, and Petie were retired after this year and replaced with Dot, Helen, June, Kathy, Lorna, Marie, Olga, and Pamela.

  • Doris
  • Elsie
  • Flossie
  • Grace
  • Helene
  • Ida
  • Jane
  • Kezia
  • Lucretia
  • Missatha
  • Nancy
  • Ossia
  • Petie
  • Ruby
  • Anita
  • Billie
  • Clara
  • Delilah
  • Ellen
  • Fran

1951 Pacific typhoon season[edit]

1952 Pacific typhoon season[edit]

Season summary

Typhoon Charlotte[edit]

Category 2 typhoon (SSHWS)
Duration June 10 – June 15
Peak intensity 155 km/h (100 mph) (1-min)  960 mbar (hPa)

Typhoon Dinah[edit]

Category 1 typhoon (SSHWS)
Duration June 19 – June 25
Peak intensity 140 km/h (85 mph) (1-min)  960 mbar (hPa)

On June 23, Dinah struck to the west of the Kanto Region in Japan. 65 people were killed and 70 were missing.[2]

Typhoon Emma[edit]

Category 3 typhoon (SSHWS)
Duration June 28 – July 6
Peak intensity 205 km/h (125 mph) (1-min)  975 mbar (hPa)

Tropical Storm Freda[edit]

Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Duration July 11 – July 15
Peak intensity 85 km/h (50 mph) (1-min)  995 mbar (hPa)

Tropical Storm Gilda[edit]

Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Duration July 15 – July 20
Peak intensity 95 km/h (60 mph) (1-min)  990 mbar (hPa)

Typhoon Harriet[edit]

Category 3 typhoon (SSHWS)
Duration July 26 – July 30
Peak intensity 185 km/h (115 mph) (1-min)  980 mbar (hPa)

Tropical Storm Ivy[edit]

Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Duration August 2 – August 8
Peak intensity 85 km/h (50 mph) (1-min)  990 mbar (hPa)

Tropical Storm Jeanne[edit]

Tropical Storm (JMA)
Duration August 4 – August 7
Peak intensity Winds unknown  985 mbar (hPa)

Typhoon Karen[edit]

Category 2 typhoon (SSHWS)
Duration August 10 – August 20
Peak intensity 155 km/h (100 mph) (1-min)  955 mbar (hPa)

Typhoon Lois[edit]

Category 1 typhoon (SSHWS)
Duration August 22 – August 30
Peak intensity 140 km/h (85 mph) (1-min)  975 mbar (hPa)

Typhoon Mary[edit]

Category 1 typhoon (SSHWS)
Duration August 29 – September 4
Peak intensity 120 km/h (75 mph) (1-min)  985 mbar (hPa)

Typhoon Nona[edit]

Category 1 typhoon (SSHWS)
Duration September 2 – September 8
Peak intensity 150 km/h (90 mph) (1-min)  980 mbar (hPa)

Tropical Storm 12W[edit]

Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Duration September 7 – September 14
Peak intensity 75 km/h (45 mph) (1-min)  995 mbar (hPa)

Super Typhoon Olive[edit]

Category 5 super typhoon (SSHWS)
Duration September 13 – September 21
Peak intensity 295 km/h (185 mph) (1-min)  940 mbar (hPa)
Main article: Typhoon Olive (1952)

Tropical Storm 14W[edit]

Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Duration September 16 – September 19
Peak intensity 65 km/h (40 mph) (1-min)  996 mbar (hPa)

Typhoon Polly[edit]

Category 1 typhoon (SSHWS)
Duration September 26 – October 3
Peak intensity 130 km/h (80 mph) (1-min)  975 mbar (hPa)

Typhoon Rose[edit]

Category 1 typhoon (SSHWS)
Duration October 4 – October 10
Peak intensity 150 km/h (90 mph) (1-min)  985 mbar (hPa)

Tropical Storm Shirley[edit]

Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Duration October 14 – October 15
Peak intensity 75 km/h (45 mph) (1-min)  995 mbar (hPa)

Typhoon Trix[edit]

Category 4 typhoon (SSHWS)
Duration October 15 – October 26
Peak intensity 220 km/h (140 mph) (1-min)  965 mbar (hPa)

Typhoon Trix struck the central Philippines with winds of 140 mph. Trix struck the Bicol region hard killing 995 people.[3]

Typhoon Vae[edit]

Category 1 typhoon (SSHWS)
Duration October 17 – October 20
Peak intensity 120 km/h (75 mph) (1-min) 

Super Typhoon Wilma[edit]

Category 5 super typhoon (SSHWS)
Duration October 21 – October 31
Peak intensity 295 km/h (185 mph) (1-min)  930 mbar (hPa)

On October 26, ten people were lost when a USAF WB-29 disappeared during a flight into Super Typhoon Wilma.[4]

Super Typhoon Agnes[edit]

Category 5 super typhoon (SSHWS)
Duration October 28 – November 7
Peak intensity 280 km/h (175 mph) (1-min)  920 mbar (hPa)

Typhoon Bess[edit]

Category 3 typhoon (SSHWS)
Duration November 9 – November 16
Peak intensity 185 km/h (115 mph) (1-min)  915 mbar (hPa)

Typhoon Carmen[edit]

Category 3 typhoon (SSHWS)
Duration November 15 – November 22
Peak intensity 205 km/h (125 mph) (1-min)  960 mbar (hPa)

Super Typhoon Della[edit]

Category 5 super typhoon (SSHWS)
Duration November 22 – November 27
Peak intensity 280 km/h (175 mph) (1-min)  980 mbar (hPa)

Tropical Storm Elaine[edit]

Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Duration December 4 – December 6
Peak intensity 85 km/h (50 mph) (1-min)  990 mbar (hPa)

Tropical Storm Faye[edit]

Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Duration December 16 – December 19
Peak intensity 85 km/h (50 mph) (1-min)  990 mbar (hPa)

Super Typhoon Gloria[edit]

Category 4 super typhoon (SSHWS)
Duration December 16 – December 25
Peak intensity 240 km/h (150 mph) (1-min)  990 mbar (hPa)

Super Typhoon Hester[edit]

Category 5 super typhoon (SSHWS)
Duration December 27 – January 4
Peak intensity 295 km/h (185 mph) (1-min)  950 mbar (hPa)

1952 storm names[edit]

The names Jeanne, Lois, Nona, Vae and Wilma were retired after this year.

  • Charlotte
  • Dinah
  • Emma
  • Freda
  • Gilda
  • Harriet
  • Ivy
  • Jeanne
  • Karen
  • Lois
  • Mary
  • Nona
  • Olive
  • Polly
  • Rose
  • Shirley
  • Trix
  • Vae
  • Wilma
  • Agnes
  • Bess
  • Carmen
  • Della
  • Elaine
  • Faye
  • Gloria
  • Hester

1953 Pacific typhoon season[edit]

Season summary

Typhoon Irma[edit]

Category 3 typhoon (SSHWS)
Duration February 18 – February 25
Peak intensity 185 km/h (115 mph) (1-min)  980 mbar (hPa)

Typhoon Judy[edit]

Category 4 typhoon (SSHWS)
Duration May 28 – June 7
Peak intensity 220 km/h (140 mph) (1-min)  940 mbar (hPa)

Typhoon Judy struck the Southern Japanese island of Kyūshū. 37 people were killed and 15 were missing.[2]

Tropical Storm 04W[edit]

Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Duration June 24 – June 26
Peak intensity 75 km/h (45 mph) (1-min)  1000 mbar (hPa)

Super Typhoon Kit[edit]

Category 5 super typhoon (SSHWS)
Duration June 25 – July 8
Peak intensity 280 km/h (175 mph) (1-min)  910 mbar (hPa)

Typhoon Lola[edit]

Category 1 typhoon (SSHWS)
Duration July 23 – August 3
Peak intensity 150 km/h (90 mph) (1-min)  970 mbar (hPa)

Typhoon Mamie[edit]

Category 3 typhoon (SSHWS)
Duration July 30 – August 8
Peak intensity 185 km/h (115 mph) (1-min)  980 mbar (hPa)

Super Typhoon Nina[edit]

Category 5 super typhoon (SSHWS)
Duration August 8 – August 18
Peak intensity 295 km/h (185 mph) (1-min)  885 mbar (hPa)

Nina was a major storm. It made landfall in China as a Category 4 tropical cyclone.

Tropical Storm 09W[edit]

Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Duration August 9 – August 11
Peak intensity 85 km/h (50 mph) (1-min) 

Typhoon Ophelia[edit]

Category 3 typhoon (SSHWS)
Duration August 12 – August 16
Peak intensity 185 km/h (115 mph) (1-min)  960 mbar (hPa)

Typhoon Phyllis[edit]

Category 1 typhoon (SSHWS)
Duration August 15 – August 22
Peak intensity 140 km/h (85 mph) (1-min)  975 mbar (hPa)

Typhoon Rita[edit]

Category 4 typhoon (SSHWS)
Duration August 23 – September 2
Peak intensity 230 km/h (145 mph) (1-min)  940 mbar (hPa)

Tropical Storm 13W[edit]

Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Duration August 26 – August 29
Peak intensity 100 km/h (65 mph) (1-min)  995 mbar (hPa)

Typhoon Susan[edit]

Category 3 typhoon (SSHWS)
Duration September 15 – September 20
Peak intensity 205 km/h (125 mph) (1-min)  970 mbar (hPa)

Super Typhoon Tess[edit]

Category 5 super typhoon (SSHWS)
Duration September 17 – September 27
Peak intensity 280 km/h (175 mph) (1-min)  900 mbar (hPa)

Typhoon Tess struck the Central Honshū Island in Japan. 393 people were killed and 85 were missing.[2]

Tropical Storm 16W[edit]

Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Duration September 25 – September 28
Peak intensity 75 km/h (45 mph) (1-min)  1000 mbar (hPa)

JMA Tropical Storm 15[edit]

Tropical Storm (JMA)
Duration October 1 – October 3
Peak intensity Winds unknown  999 mbar (hPa)

Typhoon Viola[edit]

Category 3 typhoon (SSHWS)
Duration October 3 – October 8
Peak intensity 185 km/h (115 mph) (1-min)  965 mbar (hPa)

Typhoon Winnie[edit]

Category 1 typhoon (SSHWS)
Duration October 6 – October 9
Peak intensity 120 km/h (75 mph) (1-min)  990 mbar (hPa)

Typhoon Alice[edit]

Category 3 typhoon (SSHWS)
Duration October 11 – October 23
Peak intensity 185 km/h (115 mph) (1-min)  915 mbar (hPa)

Super Typhoon Betty[edit]

Category 4 super typhoon (SSHWS)
Duration October 25 – November 2
Peak intensity 240 km/h (150 mph) (1-min)  965 mbar (hPa)

Typhoon Cora[edit]

Category 4 typhoon (SSHWS)
Duration November 8 – November 20
Peak intensity 220 km/h (140 mph) (1-min)  960 mbar (hPa)

Tropical Storm 22W[edit]

Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Duration November 25 – November 29
Peak intensity 75 km/h (45 mph) (1-min)  1000 mbar (hPa)

Tropical Storm 23W[edit]

Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Duration November 28 – December 3
Peak intensity 75 km/h (45 mph) (1-min)  1000 mbar (hPa)

Super Typhoon Doris[edit]

Category 5 super typhoon (SSHWS)
Duration December 9 – December 22
Peak intensity 280 km/h (175 mph) (1-min)  935 mbar (hPa)

1953 storm names[edit]

  • Irma
  • Judy
  • Kit
  • Lola
  • Mamie
  • Nina
  • Ophelia
  • Phyllis
  • Rita
  • Susan
  • Tess
  • Viola
  • Winnie
  • Alice
  • Betty
  • Cora
  • Doris

1954 Pacific typhoon season[edit]

Season summary

Tropical Storm 01W[edit]

Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Counterclockwise vortex
Duration March 1 – March 4
Peak intensity 95 km/h (60 mph) (1-min)  990 mbar (hPa)

Typhoon Elsie[edit]

Category 3 typhoon (SSHWS)
Counterclockwise vortex
Duration May 5 – May 12
Peak intensity 185 km/h (115 mph) (1-min)  945 mbar (hPa)

Typhoon Flossie[edit]

Category 1 typhoon (SSHWS)
Counterclockwise vortex
Duration July 4 – July 10
Peak intensity 140 km/h (85 mph) (1-min)  985 mbar (hPa)

Typhoon Grace[edit]

Category 3 typhoon (SSHWS)
Counterclockwise vortex
Duration August 11 – August 19
Peak intensity 185 km/h (115 mph) (1-min)  940 mbar (hPa)

Typhoon Grace struck the Southern Japanese islands of Kyūshū and Shikoku. 28 people were killed and 33 were missing.[2]

Typhoon Helen[edit]

Category 1 typhoon (SSHWS)
Counterclockwise vortex
Duration August 11 – August 17
Peak intensity 130 km/h (80 mph) (1-min)  965 mbar (hPa)

Typhoon Ida[edit]

Category 5 super typhoon (SSHWS)
Counterclockwise vortex
Duration August 18 – August 31
Peak intensity 280 km/h (175 mph) (1-min)  890 mbar (hPa)

Tropical Storm 07W[edit]

Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Counterclockwise vortex
Duration August 20 – August 26
Peak intensity 75 km/h (45 mph) (1-min)  998 mbar (hPa)

Tropical Storm 08W[edit]

Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Counterclockwise vortex
Duration August 28 – August 31
Peak intensity 75 km/h (45 mph) (1-min)  995 mbar (hPa)

Typhoon Kathy[edit]

Category 2 typhoon (SSHWS)
Counterclockwise vortex
Duration August 28 – September 8
Peak intensity 165 km/h (105 mph) (1-min)  940 mbar (hPa)

Typhoon June[edit]

Category 4 super typhoon (SSHWS)
Counterclockwise vortex
Duration September 4 – September 15
Peak intensity 240 km/h (150 mph) (1-min)  910 mbar (hPa)

Typhoon June struck the Southern Japanese hitting the area west of Kanto especially hard. 107 people were killed and 39 were missing.[2]

Typhoon Lorna[edit]

Category 3 typhoon (SSHWS)
Counterclockwise vortex
Duration September 11 – September 19
Peak intensity 185 km/h (115 mph) (1-min)  950 mbar (hPa)

Typhoon Lorna brushed the southern coast of the Japanese island of Shikoku. 34 people were killed and 20 were missing.[2]

Typhoon Marie[edit]

Category 1 typhoon (SSHWS)
Counterclockwise vortex
Duration September 19 – September 28
Peak intensity 140 km/h (85 mph) (1-min)  956 mbar (hPa)

Typhoon Marie had a minimum pressure of 956 mb and a maximum windspeeds of 85 mph. Marie crossed the southern islands of Kyūshū and Shikoku before turning northeast and striking Hokkaidō island. Marie caused the ship Toya Maru to sink in the Hokkaidō Strait. 1,361 people were killed and 400 were left missing.[2]

Typhoon Nancy[edit]

Category 2 typhoon (SSHWS)
Counterclockwise vortex
Duration September 30 – October 13
Peak intensity 155 km/h (100 mph) (1-min)  965 mbar (hPa)

Typhoon Olga[edit]

Category 3 typhoon (SSHWS)
Counterclockwise vortex
Duration October 12 – October 19
Peak intensity 185 km/h (115 mph) (1-min)  935 mbar (hPa)

Tropical Storm 15W[edit]

Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Counterclockwise vortex
Duration October 24 – October 26
Peak intensity 75 km/h (45 mph) (1-min)  1004 mbar (hPa)

Typhoon Pamela[edit]

Category 5 super typhoon (SSHWS)
Counterclockwise vortex
Duration October 27 – November 8
Peak intensity 280 km/h (175 mph) (1-min)  900 mbar (hPa)

Typhoon Ruby[edit]

Category 5 super typhoon (SSHWS)
Counterclockwise vortex
Duration November 2 – November 11
Peak intensity 280 km/h (175 mph) (1-min)  940 mbar (hPa)

Typhoon Sally[edit]

Category 5 super typhoon (SSHWS)
Counterclockwise vortex
Duration November 10 – November 20
Peak intensity 280 km/h (175 mph) (1-min)  925 mbar (hPa)

Typhoon Tilda[edit]

Category 4 typhoon (SSHWS)
Counterclockwise vortex
Duration November 22 – December 1
Peak intensity 230 km/h (145 mph) (1-min)  940 mbar (hPa)

1954 storm names[edit]

  • Elsie
  • Flossie
  • Grace
  • Helen
  • Ida
  • June
  • Kathy
  • Lorna
  • Marie
  • Nancy
  • Olga
  • Pamela
  • Ruby
  • Sally
  • Tilda

1955 Pacific typhoon season[edit]

Season summary

Typhoon Louise struck the western Kyūshū Island in southern Japan. 54 people were killed and 14 were missing.[2]

  • Violet
  • Wilda
  • Anita
  • Billie
  • Clara
  • Dot
  • Ellen
  • Fran
  • Georgia
  • Hope
  • Iris
  • Joan
  • Kate
  • Louise
  • Marge
  • Nora
  • Opal
  • Patsy
  • Ruth

1956 Pacific typhoon season[edit]

Season summary

Typhoon Sarah formed at a low latitude on March 21, 1956 and took a generally Northwest heading. On the 31st as it approached the Philippine Islands, it slowed then reversed its direction dissipating on April 4th.

On April 16, 1956, Typhoon Thelma formed near the formation place of Typhoon Sarah. Thelma struck the Philippine Islands in the 21st and passed close to Formosa on the 23rd then struck Japan. The U.S. Navy Fleet Weather Central in Guam stopped following Thelma on April 25th.

Typhoon Babs struck the western Kyūshū Island in southern Japan. 33 people were killed and 3 were missing.[2]

Map plotting the track and intensity of the storm according to the Saffir–Simpson hurricane wind scale
Main article: Typhoon Emma (1956)

Emma was a powerful mid-season typhoon that struck the U.S. held island of Okinawa and South Korea. The typhoon killed 64 people with 35 missing and down millions in damage.

On August 1, Typhoon Wanda made landfall along the coast of Zhejiang, China, killing over 5700 people. This was the second strongest typhoon to hit China since 1949, after Typhoon Saomai, as well as the second deadliest since 1949, after Typhoon Nina (1975).

A moderately powerful typhoon, Harriet brought heavy rains and 110 mph winds to Japan. The typhoon destroyed 600 buildings and killed 38 people. Harriet then crossed the Sea of Japan before making a second landfall in South Korea. There, the storm brought heavy rains and gusty winds before dissipating. Harriet killed 53 people and left $50 million (1956) dollars in damage.

A weak December typhoon, Polly brought 100 mph winds and 11 inch rains to the Philippines on December 13. The typhoon killed 79 people and left $2.5 million (1956) dollars in damage.

1956 storm names[edit]

  • Sarah
  • Thelma
  • Vera
  • Wanda
  • Amy
  • Babs
  • Charlotte
  • Dinah
  • Emma
  • Freda
  • Gilda
  • Harriet
  • Ivy
  • Jean
  • Karen
  • Lucille
  • Mary
  • Nadine
  • Olive
  • Polly

1957 Pacific typhoon season[edit]

Season summary

The 1957 season was fairly active, with 17 typhoons, of which six reached supertyphoon status. Typhoon Virginia in June killed 86 people and caused $80 million in damage when it struck Taiwan and southern Japan. Typhoon Faye in September resulted in heavy damage and killed over 50 people on Okinawa.

1958 Pacific typhoon season[edit]

Season summary

The 1958 season included 23 named storms. The first storm of the season, Ophelia, crashed a recon flight into the storm on January 15.[4] In May, Typhoon Phyllis attained a peak of 185 mph, the strongest typhoon ever in the month of May.[5] Typhoon Alice caused 41 deaths and heavy damage after hitting southeastern Japan on July 22.[6] Later, Typhoon Ida reached peak winds of 200 mph on September 24 with a record low pressure (at the time) of 877 mbar.[7] It caused extensive mudslides in Japan, killed 888 people, and left 500,000 people homeless.[2][8]

1959 Pacific typhoon season[edit]

Season summary

The 1959 Pacific typhoon season featured 24 tropical cyclones, though operationally 59 total areas of investigation were classified by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC);[9] three systems were handled by the responsibility of FWB at Pearl Harbor and the USWB at Honolulu. Three systems were questionable due to lack of reconnaissance aircraft use. In total, the season featured 65 tropical cyclones and areas of investigation operationally, including central Pacific Hurricane Patsy, which was operationally believed to have crossed the International Date Line into the western Pacific.[9] The first annual tropical cyclone report for the western North Pacific Ocean was issued by the agency.[9]


Of the 23 tropical cyclones and 65 total areas of investigation, 17 storms attained typhoon status, which was below the yearly average of 19.[9] At least nine other tropical systems never exceeded tropical storm intensity operationally. Most of the systems were noted to have developed within the typical spawning grounds for typhoons originating from easterly waves within the Intertropical Convergence Zone; the exceptions were Ellen and Georgia which developed from cold-core troughs extending southward into the tropical latitudes.[9] Of the 17 typhoons that formed, five were first detected within 300 miles (500 km) of the island of Guam. Three of the typhoons developed at a slow rate, while three others rapidly intensified to typhoon status within hours. Only four typhoons were small in diameter, while at least three typhoons developed to large sizes and became the dominant tropical features during the season.[9] Two of the typhoons — Joan and Vera — featured sea-level pressures below 900 millibars and were the most intense tropical cyclones during the season, each featuring winds of 190 mph (305 km/h) or greater.[9][10] Of the total number of typhoons, 215 reconnaissance missions were flown into the storms, including 3,799 observations and 391 total fixes. The average track error for each advisory for storms during the season was 63.9 miles (102.8 km) for 12-hour forecasts and 301.6 miles (485.4 km) for 48-hour forecasts.[9]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]