Typhoon Saola (2012)

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This article is about the 2012 typhoon. For other storms of the same name, see Typhoon Saola.
Typhoon Saola (Gener)
Typhoon (JMA scale)
Category 2 typhoon (SSHWS/JTWC)
TY Saola 10w Aug 01 2012.jpg
Typhoon Saola making landfall over Taiwan on August 1, 2012 with Typhoon Damrey to the north
Formed July 26, 2012
Dissipated August 5, 2012
Highest winds 10-minute sustained: 130 km/h (80 mph)
1-minute sustained: 165 km/h (105 mph)
Lowest pressure 960 mbar (hPa); 28.35 inHg
Fatalities 82 total
Damage $161 million (2012 USD)
Areas affected Philippines, Taiwan, Japan, China
Part of the 2012 Pacific typhoon season

Typhoon Saola (international designation: 1209, JTWC designation: 10W, PAGASA name: Gener) was a tropical cyclone affecting the Philippines, Taiwan and China. It was the ninth named storm and the fourth typhoon of the 2012 Pacific typhoon season. Saola is the name of a rare mammal found in Vietnam.

Meteorological history[edit]

Map showing the path of the storm; the points indicate the storm's position and intensity at six-hour intervals, and are colored using the Saffir–Simpson hurricane wind scale.

On July 26, the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) reported that a tropical depression had developed within an area of strong vertical windshear in the monsoon trough about 1,000 kilometres (620 mi) to the southeast of Manila in the Philippines.[1][2] During that day the shear relaxed before during the next day, the Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) issued a Tropical Cyclone Formation Alert on the system.[3]

Severe Tropical Storm Saola over Taiwan, with its companion, Damrey, noting a cloud band with Saola.

Early on July 28, the JTWC upgraded the system to a tropical depression, whilst the JMA upgraded it to a tropical storm and named it Saola.[4][5] Soon, the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration (PAGASA) upgraded the system to a tropical depression and named it Gener.[6] Later that day, the JTWC upgraded Saola to a tropical storm.[7] Early on July 29, the JMA upgraded Saola to a severe tropical storm.[8] On July 30, the JTWC upgraded Saola to a category 1 typhoon, as it started to develop an eye-like feature, but soon downgraded it to a tropical storm late on the same day.[9][10] On July 31, the JTWC upgraded Saola to a category 1 typhoon again.[11] Late on the same day, the JMA upgraded Saola to a typhoon, and the JTWC soon upgraded it to a category 2 typhoon early on the next day.[12][13] The Central Weather Bureau (CWB) reported that Typhoon Saola made landfall over Xiulin, Hualien in Taiwan at 19:20 UTC on August 1 (03:20 TST on August 2).[14] However, Saola later moved counterclockwise and arrived the ocean soon, whilst the JMA downgraded it to a severe tropical storm early on August 2 due to strong land interaction.[15] At 06Z on the same day, Saola passed over Cape San Diego, the easternmost point of Taiwan.[16] Late on August 2, the JMA downgraded Saola to a tropical storm, before it made landfall over Fuding in Fujian, China at 22:50 UTC (06:50 CST on August 3).[17] On August 3, the JMA downgraded Saola to a tropical depression, after the JTWC issued a final warning on the system. The system continued to weaken into a weak low pressure area over Jiangxi, China on August 4. The weak, remnant low later drifted south west to the Gulf of Tokin, and regenerated slightly on August 7.[18]

Preparations and impact[edit]

Philippines[edit]

Wettest tropical cyclone s and their remnants in Taiwan
Highest known totals
Precipitation Storm Location Ref
Rank mm in
1 3060 120.5 Morakot 2009 Alishan, Chiayi [19]
2 2319 91.3 Nari 2001 Wulai, New Taipei [20]
3 2162 85.1 Flossie 1969 Beitou, Taipei [19]
4 1987 78.2 Herb 1996 Alishan, Chiayi [21]
5 1774 69.8 Saola 2012 Yilan City [22]
6 1672 65.8 Carla 1967 Dongshan, Yilan [23]
7 1611 63.4 Sinlaku 2008 Heping, Taichung [24]
8 1561 61.5 Haitang 2005 Sandimen, Pingtung [25]
9 1546 60.9 Aere 2004 Miaoli County [26]
10 1500 59.1 Parma 2009 Yilan County [27]

Saola caused widespread rains in the Philippines due to the enhancement of the southwest monsoon. On July 29, domestic and international flights throughout the country were delayed and cancelled. Small fishing crafts were advised to not engage in the water as a gale warning was issued by PAGASA. The NDRRMC alerted their agency as the storm is expected to bring heavy rains. Seaports were also advised to cancel their trips. Flooding is imminent as different dams are expected to reach its critical level and possibly release huge millimeters of water. About three roads in northern Luzon were impassable due to floods and landslides. About sixty families in Rodriguez, Rizal were evacuated due to severe flooding in the area. Early on July 30, classes were suspended from pre-school to tertiary level as strong winds and severe rainfall were recorded throughout Metro Manila and nearby provinces.[28][29][30][31]

Initial reports spoke of around a dozen confirmed casualties, yet early on 3 August Philippine authorities revised the death toll in the country to 37, with at least 519,000 people affected. More than 17,500 were staying in evacuation centers.[32] As of August 6, 51 fatalities were confirmed in the Philippines with six others reported missing. Damage from the storm amounted to about 404 million (US$9.6 million), half of which was due to agricultural losses.[33]

Taiwan[edit]

Radar loop of Typhoon Saola landfalling over Taiwan from July 30, to August 3.

As the storm made landfall in Taiwan, almost the entire island suspended services as high winds and rains triggered flooding in several locations. Almost 70 inches fell in some areas, ranking Saola within the top 5 wettest cyclones to ever hit the island. Authorities ordered schools and business to shut, with the exception of few major factories. Financial markets were also closed, and would remain until 3 August. Taiwanese Army soldiers rescued more than 1,000 people from remote mountainous villages in the north and east.[34] Two passenger boarding bridges collapsed at Taoyuan International Airport, which serves Taipei, slightly damaging a China Airlines aircraft and forcing the company to scrap the flight. More than 200 international and domestic flight were reportedly cancelled because of the storm.[35]

At least six people were killed and two were missing in Taiwan as of 2 August, in addition to 16 injured.[34][35] Agricultural losses across the island were estimated at NT$812.51 million (US$27.14 million).[36]

China[edit]

In Hubei Province, flooding set off by more than 400 mm (16 in) of rain produced by Typhoon Saola killed 25 people and left 9 others missing.[37] A total of 9,708 homes were destroyed and 36,726 more were damaged.[38] Over 135,000 people were displaced by the floods and left in need of assistance across the province.[39] Total economic losses in the province reached US$124 million.[37]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "JMA WWJP25 Warning and Summary July 26, 2012 18z". Japan Meteorological Agency. Archived from the original on July 27, 2012. Retrieved August 4, 2012. 
  2. ^ Joint Typhoon Warning Center. "Significant Tropical Weather Outlook for the Western and South Pacific Ocean July 26, 2012 01z". United States Navy, United States Airforce. Archived from the original on July 26, 2012. Retrieved August 4, 2012. 
  3. ^ Joint Typhoon Warning Center (July 27, 2012). "Tropical Cyclone Formation Alert July 27, 2012 14z". United States Navy, United States Airforce. Archived from the original on July 27, 2012. Retrieved August 4, 2012. 
  4. ^ "Tropical Depression 10W Advisory 1". Joint Typhoon Warning Center. July 28, 2012. Retrieved August 1, 2012. 
  5. ^ "Tropical Storm Saola Tropical Cyclone Advisory 280000". Japan Meteorological Agency. July 28, 2012. Retrieved August 1, 2012. 
  6. ^ "Severe Weather Bulletin Number ONE". Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration. July 28, 2012. Retrieved August 1, 2012. 
  7. ^ "Tropical Storm 10W (Saola) Advisory 2". Joint Typhoon Warning Center. July 28, 2012. Retrieved August 1, 2012. 
  8. ^ "Severe Tropical Storm Saola Tropical Cyclone Advisory 290000". Japan Meteorological Agency. July 29, 2012. Retrieved August 1, 2012. 
  9. ^ "Typhoon 10W (Saola) Advisory 10". Joint Typhoon Warning Center. July 30, 2012. Retrieved August 1, 2012. 
  10. ^ "Tropical Storm 10W (Saola) Advisory 12". Joint Typhoon Warning Center. July 30, 2012. Retrieved August 1, 2012. 
  11. ^ "Typhoon 10W (Saola) Advisory 14". Joint Typhoon Warning Center. July 31, 2012. Retrieved August 1, 2012. 
  12. ^ "Typhoon Saola Tropical Cyclone Advisory 311800". Japan Meteorological Agency. July 31, 2012. Retrieved August 1, 2012. 
  13. ^ "Typhoon 10W (Saola) Advisory 17". Joint Typhoon Warning Center. August 1, 2012. Retrieved August 1, 2012. 
  14. ^ "蘇拉花蓮登陸 全台豪雨". Liberty Times. August 1, 2012. Retrieved August 2, 2012. 
  15. ^ "蘇拉》蘇拉打轉 花蓮近海徘徊". Liberty Times. August 2, 2012. Retrieved August 2, 2012. 
  16. ^ "蘇拉轉輕颱 三貂角二度登陸". Apple Daily. August 2, 2012. Retrieved August 2, 2012. 
  17. ^ "「蘇拉」在福建福鼎秦嶼鎮沿海登陸". Ta Kung Pao. August 2, 2012. Retrieved August 3, 2012. 
  18. ^ "WWJP25 RJTD 040600". Japan Meteorological Agency. August 4, 2012. Retrieved August 4, 2012. 
  19. ^ a b Central Weather Bureau (2010). "侵台颱風資料庫". Retrieved 2011-10-19. 
  20. ^ Unattributed (2009-09-09). "莫拉克颱風暴雨量及洪流量分析". Water Resources Agency, Ministry of Economic Affairs, Republic of China. Retrieved 2011-07-17. 
  21. ^ Unattributed (2009-09-09). "莫拉克颱風暴雨量及洪流量分析". Water Resources Agency, Ministry of Economic Affairs, Republic of China. Retrieved 2011-07-17. 
  22. ^ Chen Zhi (August 2, 2012). "Typhoon Saola dumps heavy downpours around Taiwan". Xinhua General News. Retrieved August 2, 2012. 
  23. ^ Lianshou, Chen. "Topic 2.1 Observing and forecasting rainfall". Fifth International Workshop on Tropical Cyclones. Retrieved August 4, 2012. 
  24. ^ "Typhoon Sinlaku Central emergency operation center No.12". Central emergency operation center. 2008-09-16. Retrieved 2009-01-13. 
  25. ^ Chiu Yu-Tzu (July 20, 2005). "Haitang fizzles out, leaves Taiwan wet". Taipei Times. Retrieved April 11, 2010. 
  26. ^ Padgett, Gary. "Monthly Global Tropical Cyclone Summary: November 2004". Retrieved 2012-06-10. 
  27. ^ "Agricultural losses from Typhoon Parma total NT$29.5 million". Taiwan News. 2009-10-06. Retrieved 2009-10-06. 
  28. ^ "Bagyong Gener, nagdulot ng pagbaha sa ilang lalawigan kasama na ang Bulan, Sorsogon at ilang barangay sa Sultan Kudarat #BalitanghaliWeekend : gmanews". Inagist.com. Retrieved 2012-08-01. 
  29. ^ "Noypistuff: Bagyong Gener PAGASA Update July 28, 2012". Noypistuff.blogspot.com. 2012-07-28. Retrieved 2012-08-01. 
  30. ^ "La Mesa Dam on red alert as water nears spilling level | GMA News Online | The Go-To Site for Filipinos Everywhere". Gmanetwork.com. Retrieved 2012-08-01. 
  31. ^ "NDRRMC: 3 Luzon roads impassable as Tropical Storm Gener nears | GMA News Online | The Go-To Site for Filipinos Everywhere". Gmanetwork.com. Retrieved 2012-08-01. 
  32. ^ "NDRRMC: 'Gener' death toll rises to 37". GMA News. 2012-08-02. Retrieved 2012-08-02. 
  33. ^ "SitRep No.21 re Effects of Typhoon "Gener" (Saola) Enhanced by Southwest Monsoon" (PDF). National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council. August 6, 2012. Retrieved August 6, 2012. 
  34. ^ a b "Tropical storm Saola washes over Taiwan". Al Jazeera. 2012-08-02. Retrieved 2012-08-02. 
  35. ^ a b "Six killed as Typhoon Saola lashes Taiwan". Pakistan International. 2012-08-02. Retrieved 2012-08-02. 
  36. ^ Huang Chiao-wen and Hanna Liu (August 6, 2012). "Typhoon Saola causes over US$27 million in agricultural losses". Focus Taiwan. Retrieved August 6, 2012. 
  37. ^ a b "China: 13 killed, three missing after heavy rains". Xinhua General News. Zee News. August 7, 2012. Retrieved August 7, 2012. 
  38. ^ "China: Floods - Information Bulletin no 2". International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies. ReliefWeb. August 10, 2012. Retrieved August 10, 2012. 
  39. ^ Yan (August 6, 2012). "Typhoon-triggered rainstorm leaves 23 dead, 9 missing". Xinhua General News. Retrieved August 6, 2012. 

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