Tropical Storm Podul (2013)

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Tropical Storm Podul (Zoraida)
Tropical storm (JMA scale)
Tropical depression (JTWC scale)
Zoraida Nov 14 2013 0305Z.jpg
Tropical Storm Podul on November 14, 2013
Formed November 11, 2013 (2013-11-11)
Dissipated November 15, 2013 (2013-11-15)
Highest winds 10-minute sustained: 65 km/h (40 mph)
1-minute sustained: 55 km/h (35 mph)
Lowest pressure 1000 mbar (hPa); 29.53 inHg
Fatalities 44 total
Damage $72 million (2013 USD)
Areas affected Palau, Philippines, Vietnam
Part of the 2013 Pacific typhoon season

Tropical Storm Podul, known in the Philippines as Tropical Depression Zoraida, was a weak but destructive tropical cyclone that affected the Philippines shortly after the devastating Typhoon Haiyan. The 31st named storm of the 2013 Pacific typhoon season, Podul developed as a tropical depression on November 11 between Palau and the Philippine island of Mindanao. The system moved west-northwestward and struck Davao Oriental in Mindanao on November 12, bringing heavy rainfall that killed two people and disrupted relief efforts following Haiyan. After crossing the Philippines, the depression intensified into Tropical Storm Podul on November 14. Shortly thereafter, the storm struck southeastern Vietnam, and its circulation dissipated on November 15. In Vietnam, Podul produced heavy rainfall that resulted in severe flooding. The storm damaged or destroyed 427,258 houses, and overall damage was estimated at 1.5 trillion (2013 Vietnamese dong, $72 million 2013 USD). Podul killed 42 people in the country and caused 74 injuries.

Meteorological history[edit]

Map plotting the track and intensity of the storm according to the Saffir–Simpson hurricane wind scale

On November 9, an area of disorganized convection, or thunderstorms, persisted about 1175 km (730 mi) southeast of Palau. The system consisted of a broad circulation, affected to its detriment by moderate wind shear.[1] Moving west-northwestward, the convection persisted and organized into the circulation, indicative of an increased potential for tropical cyclogenesis.[2] Late on November 10, the Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC)[nb 1] issued a Tropical Cyclone Formation Alert (TCFA), meaning the agency anticipated a tropical depression would develop within 24 hours.[4] Shortly thereafter, the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration (PAGASA) initiated advisories on Tropical Depression Zoraida after the system entered its area of responsibility of the agency.[5] At 1200 UTC on November 11, the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA)[nb 2] estimated that a tropical depression formed about halfway between Palau and the Philippine island of Mindanao,[7] although operationally the agency had classified the system two days prior.[8]

After passing south of Palau, the system's circulation became more broad and its convection became less organized, despite decreased wind shear.[9] Early on November 12, the depression made landfall on Mindanao in Davao Oriental province.[10] Shortly thereafter, PAGASA discontinued advisories on Zoraida, declaring that the depression degenerated into a low pressure area.[11] By contrast, the JMA continued monitoring the depression as it moved through the Philippines and into the Sulu Sea. On November 13, the center crossed over Palawan island into the South China Sea. At 1200 UTC the next day, the JMA upgraded the depression to Tropical Storm Podul (1331) about 275 km (170 mi) east of the Vietnam coast.[7] Around the same time, the JTWC began issuing warnings on the system as a tropical depression 32W, noting that convection had rapidly increased over the circulation. The agency also mentioned the continued presence of wind shear, although warm water temperatures and moderate outflow were expected to allow intensification.[12] Although the JMA estimated peak 10–minute winds of 65 km/h (40 mph),[7] the JTWC only estimated tropical depression-force 1–minute winds of 45 km/h (30 mph).[13]

Late on November 14, Podul made landfall in southeastern Vietnam near Phan Rang–Tháp Chàm and quickly weakened into a tropical depression.[7] The JTWC assessed the circulation was dissipating near the coast,[14] and the JMA declared Podul dissipated at 1200 UTC on November 15.[7] Operationally, the agency tracked the system into the Gulf of Thailand,[15] and the Thai Meteorological Department tracked Podul to near the Malay Peninsula on November 16, before ceasing advisories on the storm.[16] The remnants later redeveloped into Cyclonic Storm Helen in the Bay of Bengal, which later struck southeastern India on November 22 before dissipating.[17]

Preparations and impact[edit]

The Philippine Public Storm Warning Signal of Tropical Depression Zoraida (Podul), with its path and direction

The Guam National Weather Service warned of the potential of heavy rainfall and high surf for Palau and nearby Yap island.[18] While passing south of Palau, the system produced light winds of about 28 km/h (17 mph).[9]

Late on November 10, as the system moved into the Philippine area of responsibility, PAGASA issued the Public Storm Warning Signal Number 1 for seven areas in Mindanao, indicating the potential for winds between 30–60 km/h (20–35 mph).[5] Over the next day these warnings were extended to cover three provinces in Luzon, eight provinces in Visayas and twenty-one provinces in Mindanao.[10] On Cebu Island, officials ordered schools to close during the storm's passage.[19] After the extreme damage due to Typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines, the depression that became Podul affected the same areas just days later, which affected rescue work.[20] The depression caused additional difficulties in travel and communications.[21] In addition to causing a landslide in Monkayo,[22] flooding from the depression covered roads and forced about 1,000 families to evacuate.[23] In Davao del Norte, the depression resulted in river flooding that killed two people.[24]

In Vietnam, Podul produced heavy rainfall, peaking at 973 mm (38.3 in) in two districts in Quảng Ngãi Province.[25] The rains caused flooding that forced over 78,000 people to flee their homes, including 1,400 the resort town Hội An where floodwaters reached 1.6 m (5.2 ft) deep.[26] High volumes of flooding caused water to be released from reservoirs,[27] which some local officials credited for the widespread flooding.[28] About 260 km (160 mi) of canals and dykes were washed away during the storm.[25] The high rainfall increased water levels along rivers, with the Ba River in Gia Lai Province reaching 410 mm (16 in) higher than the record set in 1981.[29] Flooding also damaged over 6,000 ha (15,000 acres) of crops,[30] mostly to rice.[27] Podul damaged or flooded about 280,000 m2 (3,000,000 sq ft) of roadways and bridges,[26] resulting in traffic jams, and halted three train lines.[31] The storm damaged or destroyed 427,258 houses, and overall damage was estimated at 1.5 trillion (2013 Vietnamese dong, $72 million 2013 USD). Throughout Vietnam, Podul killed 42 people and injured 74 others.[27][30] By November 20, the floods began receding from most locations.[25] Newspapers described the flooding as the worst in Vietnam since 1999.[32] After the storm, the Vietnamese provincial governments assisted in rebuilding houses and roads.[26]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ The Joint Typhoon Warning Center is a joint United States Navy – United States Air Force task force that issues tropical cyclone warnings for the western Pacific Ocean and other regions.[3]
  2. ^ The Japan Meteorological Agency is the official Regional Specialized Meteorological Center for the western Pacific Ocean.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Significant Tropical Weather Outlook for the Western and South Pacific Ocean (Report). Joint Typhoon Warning Center. November 9, 2013. http://www.webcitation.org/6L1OKk9g8. Retrieved January 20, 2014.
  2. ^ Significant Tropical Weather Outlook for the Western and South Pacific Ocean (Report). Joint Typhoon Warning Center. November 10, 2013. http://www.webcitation.org/6L1OKVVv4. Retrieved January 20, 2014.
  3. ^ "Joint Typhoon Warning Center Mission Statement". Joint Typhoon Warning Center. 2011. Archived from the original on July 26, 2007. Retrieved January 20, 2014. 
  4. ^ Tropical Cyclone Formation Alert (Report). National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. November 10, 2013. http://www.webcitation.org/6L2q1QdUa. Retrieved January 20, 2014.
  5. ^ a b Tropical Depression "Zoraida" Weather Bulletin Number One (Report). Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration. November 10, 2013. Archived from the original on November 11, 2013. http://www.webcitation.org/6L2rMZyOd. Retrieved January 20, 2014.
  6. ^ (PDF) Annual Report on Activities of the RSMC Tokyo: Typhoon Center 2003 (Report). Japan Meteorological Agency. 8. http://www.jma.go.jp/jma/jma-eng/jma-center/rsmc-hp-pub-eg/AnnualReport/2003/Text/Text2003.pdf. Retrieved January 20, 2014.
  7. ^ a b c d e RSMC Tokyo — Typhoon Center (December 18, 2013). Tropical Storm Podul Best Track 2013-12-18T01:00:00Z (Report). Japan Meteorological Agency. http://www.wis-jma.go.jp/cms/warning/2013/12/18/typhoon-best-track-2013-12-18t010000z/. Retrieved January 20, 2014.
  8. ^ "JMA WWJP25 Warning and Summary November 9, 2013 06z". Japan Meteorological Agency. Archived from the original on November 9, 2013. Retrieved November 17, 2013. 
  9. ^ a b Significant Tropical Weather Outlook for the Western and South Pacific Ocean (Report). Joint Typhoon Warning Center. November 10, 2013. http://www.webcitation.org/6LCrzKXne. Retrieved January 20, 2014.
  10. ^ a b Tropical Depression "Zoraida" Weather Bulletin Number Six (Report). Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration. November 12, 2013. Archived from the original on November 12, 2013. http://www.webcitation.org/6L4PbxFCz. Retrieved January 20, 2014.
  11. ^ Tropical Depression "Zoraida" Weather Bulletin Number Seven (Final) (Report). Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration. November 12, 2013. Archived from the original on November 12, 2013. http://www.webcitation.org/6L4PbLYfx. Retrieved January 20, 2014.
  12. ^ Prognostic Reasoning for Tropical Depression 32W (Podul) Warning NR 001 (Report). Joint Typhoon Warning Center. November 14, 2013. Archived from the original on November 15, 2013. http://www.webcitation.org/6L90mfjTP. Retrieved January 20, 2014.
  13. ^ Tropical Depression 32W (Podul) Warning NR 002 (Report). Joint Typhoon Warning Center. November 14, 2013. Archived from the original on November 15, 2013. http://www.webcitation.org/6L90gbxtg. Retrieved January 20, 2014.
  14. ^ Tropical Depression 32W (Podul) Warning NR 003 (Report). Joint Typhoon Warning Center. November 15, 2013. Archived from the original on November 15, 2013. http://www.webcitation.org/6L90gPDvl. Retrieved January 20, 2014.
  15. ^ JMA WWJP25 Warning and Summary November 16, 2013 12z (Report). Japan Meteorological Agency. Archived from the original on November 17, 2013. http://www.webcitation.org/6LCiuPYYj. Retrieved November 17, 2013.
  16. ^ "Storm Tracking: "Podul" Storm". Thai Meteorological Department. November 16, 2013. Archived from the original on November 17, 2013. Retrieved November 17, 2013. 
  17. ^ Gary Padgett. "Global Tropical System Tracks - November 2013". Retrieved October 16, 2014. 
  18. ^ Stanko; Aydlett (November 10, 2013). Special Weather Statement (Report). Tiyan, Guam National Weather Service. http://www.webcitation.org/6L2rHX57p. Retrieved January 20, 2014.
  19. ^ Mitchelle L. Palaubsanon; Jessa J. Agua; Michael Braga (November 13, 2013). "LGUs, DepEd suspend classes due to “Zoraida”". The Freeman. Retrieved January 20, 2014. 
  20. ^ "Global Emergency Overview Snapshot 5 – 12 November". Assessment Capacities Project (ReliefWeb). November 12, 2013. http://reliefweb.int/report/world/global-emergency-overview-snapshot-5-12-november-0. Retrieved January 20, 2014.
  21. ^ "Situation Report 3: Super Typhoon Haiyan". Church World Service (ReliefWeb). November 12, 2013. http://reliefweb.int/report/philippines/situation-report-3-super-typhoon-haiyan. Retrieved January 20, 2014.
  22. ^ Helen Flores (November 13, 2013). "Zoraida makes landfall in Davao". Philippine Star. Retrieved January 20, 2014. 
  23. ^ Frinston L. Lim (November 15, 2013). "2 missing as ‘Zoraida’ hits land in Davao Norte". Philippine Inquirer. Retrieved January 20, 2014. 
  24. ^ Orlando B. Dinoy (November 15, 2013). "Bodies of missing in ‘Zoraida’ found". Philippine Inquirer. Retrieved January 20, 2014. 
  25. ^ a b c "Viet Nam: Flooding in Central Provinces Situation Report No. 1" (PDF). United Nations Country Team in Viet Nam (ReliefWeb). November 20, 2013. http://reliefweb.int/sites/reliefweb.int/files/resources/UN%20Sitrep%20No%201-%20Flooding%20in%20Central%20Provinces%20in%20November%202013%20-%20Viet%20Nam.pdf. Retrieved January 20, 2014.
  26. ^ a b c Vu Trong Khanh (November 17, 2013). "Storm Triggers Flooding, Leaves 31 Dead in Vietnam". Wall Street Journal. Retrieved January 20, 2014. 
  27. ^ a b c "Vietnam - Floods (ECHO Daily Flash 19 November 2013)". European Commission Humanitarian Aid department. November 19, 2013. http://reliefweb.int/report/viet-nam/vietnam-floods-echo-daily-flash-19-november-2013. Retrieved January 20, 2014.
  28. ^ Nguoi Lao Dong (November 18, 2013). "Tropical Storm Podul Causes Huge Damages in Central Vietnam". VUFO-NGO Resource Center. Retrieved January 20, 2014. 
  29. ^ Mark Lawson (November 16, 2013). "Deadly Floods in Vietnam Triggered by Storm Podul". FloodList. Retrieved January 20, 2014. 
  30. ^ a b "Super Typhoon Haiyan leads November catastrophe losses with $6bn economic impact, according to Impact Forecasting report". Wall Street Journal. PR Newswire. December 6, 2013. Retrieved January 20, 2014. 
  31. ^ "Storm Podul weakens into tropical depression, killing 5 in Vietnam". Global Times. Xinhua. November 15, 2013. Retrieved January 20, 2014. 
  32. ^ "Toll from Vietnam floods rises to 34: official". ReliefWeb. Agence France-Presse. November 16, 2013. Retrieved January 20, 2014. 

External links[edit]