Tyritake

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Tyritáke
Τυριτάκη (Ancient Greek)
An ancient basin for fish preservation
Location Kerch, Republic of Crimea, Russia
Region Taurica
Coordinates 45°21′3″N 36°28′7″E / 45.35083°N 36.46861°E / 45.35083; 36.46861Coordinates: 45°21′3″N 36°28′7″E / 45.35083°N 36.46861°E / 45.35083; 36.46861
Type Settlement
Area 50 ha (120 acres)
History
Builder Settlers from Miletus
Founded 7th or 6th century BC
Abandoned Approximately 370 AD
Periods Archaic Greek
Cultures Greek
Site notes
Condition Ruined
Ownership Public
Public access Yes

Tyritáke (Greek: Τυριτάκη) was an ancient Greek town of the Bosporan Kingdom, situated in the eastern part of Crimea, about 11 km to the south from Panticapaeum. It is tentatively identified with the ruins in the Kerch district of Kamysh-Burun (Arshintsevo), on the shore of the Cimmerian Bosporus.

There are only few short mentions about Tyritake in ancient literary sources (Stephanus of Byzantium, Ethnika 642, 12; Pseudo - Aelius Herodianus, De prosodia catholica 315.12; Claudius Ptolemy, Geography 3.6.3.2; Ps. Arrian, Periplous Ponti Euxini 50,9 and Gaius Plinius Secundus, NH 4, 86-87 who names the city as Dia). First serious excavations, started in 1932 (headed by J. Marti) and have been followed in 1946-1957 by great Bosporan Expedition headed by prof. V. Gaidukievich. In 70s and 80s the territory of Tyritake was excavated by an expedition from the Kerch Museum headed by D. Kirilin and O. Shevelev and since 2000 the project "Bosporan City Tyritake" directed by prof. V. Zin'ko. In 2008 the Polish Archaeological Mission Tyritake of National Museum in Warsaw, with Alfred Twardecki as director, joined the project.

All these archaeological projects were able to establish that the colony, founded about the mid-6th century BC, specialized in crafts and viticulture. In the first centuries AD, fishing and wine production became the economical mainstay of the town. Tyritake was sacked by the Goths in the 3rd century AD and again in the 4th century by the Huns, but a settlement on the site continued into the Middle Ages.

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