Tyson Barrie

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Tyson Barrie
Tyson Barrie Avalanche.jpg
Born (1991-07-26) July 26, 1991 (age 22)
Victoria, BC, CAN
Height 5 ft 10 in (178 cm)
Weight 190 lb (86 kg; 13 st 8 lb)
Position Defence
Shoots Right
NHL team Colorado Avalanche
NHL Draft 64th overall, 2009
Colorado Avalanche
Playing career 2011–present

Tyson Barrie (born July 26, 1991) is a Canadian professional ice hockey defenceman playing with the Colorado Avalanche organization of the National Hockey League (NHL). He previously captained the Kelowna Rockets of the Western Hockey League. He is the son of former NHLer and Tampa Bay Lightning former co-owner Len Barrie.

Playing career[edit]

After initially playing in the Midget AAA league with the Juan de Fuca Grizzlies, Barrie began his major junior career in the Western Hockey League (WHL) with the Kelowna Rockets at the tail end of the 2006–07 season.

He was drafted by the Colorado Avalanche in the third round, 64th overall, of the 2009 NHL Entry Draft. On March 25, 2011, Barrie was signed by the Avalanche to a three-year entry level contract.[1]

Barrie made his professional debut in the 2011–12 season, assigned to the Avalanche's American Hockey League affiliate, the Lake Erie Monsters. As a defenceman Tyson impressively led the Monsters in scoring at the midpoint of the campaign and was selected in the AHL All-Star Game, scoring a goal, helping the Western Conference to victory.[2] Shortly after on February 4, 2012, he received his first NHL recall by the Avalanche.[3]

International play[edit]

Medal record
Competitor for Canada Canada
Ice hockey
World Junior Championships
Silver 2011 Buffalo

Barrie made his international debut at the 2008 World U-17 Hockey Challenge with Team Canada Pacific. Barrie was first invited to partake in Canada's National Junior Team development camp in 2010.[4] He was again included to take part in Canada's 2011 National Junior Team selection camp and was among the final names to make the team.[5] Barrie was among the teams' best during the Tournament as Canada had to settle for Silver in a 5-3 collapse against Russia in the final.[6]

Career statistics[edit]

Regular season and playoffs[edit]

Regular season Playoffs
Season Team League GP G A Pts PIM GP G A Pts PIM
2006–07 Juan de Fuca Grizzlies VIJHL 72 43 87 130
2006–07 Kelowna Rockets WHL 7 0 3 3 2
2006–07 Victoria Grizzlies BCHL 3 0 2 2 0
2007–08 Kelowna Rockets WHL 64 9 34 43 32 7 1 3 4 0
2008–09 Kelowna Rockets WHL 68 12 40 52 31 22 4 14 18 12
2009–10 Kelowna Rockets WHL 63 19 53 72 31 12 3 8 11 6
2010–11 Kelowna Rockets WHL 54 11 47 58 34 10 2 9 11 8
2011–12 Lake Erie Monsters AHL 49 5 27 32 24
2011–12 Colorado Avalanche NHL 10 0 0 0 0
2012–13 Lake Erie Monsters AHL 38 7 22 29 7
2012–13 Colorado Avalanche NHL 32 2 11 13 10
NHL totals 42 2 11 13 10

International[edit]

Year Team Event GP G A Pts PIM
2008 Canada U17 6 1 2 3 2
2011 Canada WJC 7 1 2 3 0
Junior int'l totals 13 2 4 6 2

Awards and honours[edit]

Award Year
WHL
CHL All-Rookie Team 2008 [7]
West First All-Star Team 2010, 2011 [8]
Bill Hunter Memorial Trophy 2010 [9]
CHL Second All-Star Team 2010 [10]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Avalanche signs Barrie". Colorado Avalanche. 2011-03-25. Retrieved 2011-03-25. 
  2. ^ "AHL All-Star Tyson Barrie is a Hershey Bear's scion". Pennlive.com. 2012-01-31. Retrieved 2012-01-31. 
  3. ^ "Tyson Barrie getting his shot". Times Colonist. 2012-02-04. Retrieved 2012-02-04. 
  4. ^ "UPDATE: Canada’s National Junior Team camp picks unveiled". goerieblogs.com. 2010-06-12. Retrieved 2010-06-12. 
  5. ^ "Hockey Canada Selection Camp: Team Profile". Hockey Canada. 2010-11-12. Retrieved 2010-11-12. 
  6. ^ "Russia shocks Canada, 5-3". International Ice Hockey Federation. 2011-01-05. Retrieved 2011-01-05. 
  7. ^ "Tyson Barrie Profile". The Hockey News. 2010-06-05. Retrieved 2010-06-05. 
  8. ^ "Kelowna's Tyson Barrie wins WHL top Honour". Kelowna.com. 2010-03-29. Retrieved 2010-03-29. 
  9. ^ "WHL defenceman of the year - Tyson Barrie". Western Hockey League. 2010-04-26. Retrieved 2010-04-26. 
  10. ^ National Hockey League (2010). The National Hockey League Official Guide & Record Book/2011. Dan Diamond and Associates. p. 278. ISBN 978-1-60078-422-4. 

External links[edit]