Business routes of U.S. Route 10 in Michigan

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US Highway 10 marker

US Highway 10
Highway system

There are three business routes of US Highway 10 in the state of Michigan. They serve as connections from the main highway into Reed City, Clare and Midland. Additionally, there were another two business routes that connected US Highway 10 (US 10) to the downtowns of Flint and Pontiac. All of these business routes are former sections of US 10.

Reed City[edit]


Business US Highway 10
Location: Reed City
Length: 2.095 mi[1] (3.372 km)
Existed: Late 1958–present

BUS US 10 is a business route running for 2.095 miles (3.372 km) in Reed City. It uses a former routing of US 10 designated in Reed City in 1958 along Church and Chestnut streets.

The western terminus of BUS US 10 is at the corner of US 10 and Chestnut St. north of downtown Reed City. The eastern terminus is at US 10 and Church St east of Reed City.

Major intersections

The entire highway is in Reed City, Osceola County.

Mile[1] km Destinations Notes
0.000 0.000 US 10 – Ludington, Clare
2.095 3.372 US 10 – Ludington, Clare
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi


Clare[edit]


Business US Highway 10
Location: Clare
Length: 5.002 mi (8.050 km)
Existed: 1975–present

BUS US 10 is a business route running in Clare. It is 5.002 miles (8.050 km) long. It uses a former routing of US 10 designated in Clare in 1975. US 10/M-115 was rerouted along the then-US 27, now-US 127 freeway to a new freeway alignment, bypassing downtown Clare and Farwell. The section of US 10 in downtown Clare was designated BUS US 10 at this time. (The section of US 10 in Farwell became a relocated M-115 in 1989/1990.)

The western terminus of BUS US 10 is at the interchange of US 127/US 10 and BUS US 127 OLD US 27. north of downtown Clare. This also marks the northern terminus of BUS US 127. The eastern terminus is at US 10 southeast of Clare.

Major intersections

County Location Mile[1] km Destinations Notes
Clare GrantSheridan township line 0.000 0.000 US 127 / US 10 – Mackinac Bridge, Lansing, Midland

BUS US 127 south
Common terminus for both BUS US 127 and BUS US 10; exit 160 on US 127/US 10
Clare 1.716 2.762
BUS US 127 south – Lansing
M‑115 north – Farwell
Southern end of BUS US 127 concurrency; southern terminus of M-115
Isabella Wise Township 5.002 8.050 US 10 east – Midland Eastbound exit and westbound entrance only
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi


Midland[edit]


Business US Highway 10
Location: Midland
Length: 7.200 mi[1] (11.587 km)
Existed: 1960[2][3]–present

BUS US 10 is a business route running 11.62 miles (18.70 km) in Midland. It was first designated in 1960. BUS US 10 replaced portions of a routing designated US 10A in Midland previous to 1960. At the time the US 10 freeway bypass of Midland and Bay City opened, US 10 bypassed downtown Midland on Saginaw Rd. Portions of US 10A became a new BUS US 10. The remainder of BUS US 10 was routed along M-20 over a pair of one-way streets in Midland. The easternmost portion of the route is a freeway with service drives: Patrick Road on the westbound side, and James Savage Road on the eastbound side.

The western terminus of BUS US 10 is at the interchange of US 10 and Eastman Rd. north of downtown Midland. The eastern terminus is at the US 10 interchange on the Midland/Bay county line with M-20. This interchange also marks the eastern terminus of M-20.

Major intersections

The entire highway is in Midland. All exits are unnumbered.

County Mile[1] km Destinations Notes
Midland 0.000–
0.117
0.000–
0.188
US 10 – Clare, Bay City
2.853 4.591 M‑20 west (Jerome Street) – Mt. Pleasant Eastern end of M-20 concurrency
4.595 7.395 Western end of freeway
4.866 7.831 Saginaw Road Interchange; eastbound exit and westbound entrance are via roundabout with Patrick Road, which replaced an existing intersection in mid-2014[4]
6.037 9.716 Waldo Road Interchange; westbound exit and eastbound entrance
Bay 7.200 11.587 M‑20 west
US 10 – Bay City
Eastern terminus of BUS US 10 and M-20; eastbound exit and westbound entrance
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

Flint[edit]


Business US Highway 10
Location: Grand BlancMount Morris
Length: 14.767 mi[1] (23.765 km)
Existed: 1942[7]–1962[5][6]

Business US Highway 10 (BUS US 10 ) was a business loop in the Flint area. It ran for about 14.8 miles (23.8 km) along Saginaw Road, which was also called Saginaw Street in the city of Flint. The highway connected to its parent in Mount Morris Township and ran southerly along Saginaw Road through Mount Morris. From there the business loop paralleled what is now I-475 into the city of Flint on Saginaw Street. In downtown, the loop crossed the Flint River. There were intersections with both directions of M-21; eastbound M-21 was routed on 5th Street while westbound traffic followed Court Street one block north. South of downtown, BUS US 10 turned southeasterly to run through suburban Burton before terminating at an intersection with US 10 (Dort Highway) near Grand Blanc in Grand Blanc Township.[5][8]

Originally, Saginaw Road in the Flint area was a part of the Saginaw Trail, a Native American foot path in the area.[9] When the state signed its highway system in 1919,[10] Saginaw Road was part of M-10.[11] Later it was used as a section of US 10 in 1926.[12] By 1942, the highway was moved eastward to follow Dort Highway, and the route through the city was designated BUS US 10.[7] Later, in 1962, US 10 was moved again to follow the recently completed I-75 freeway; the former route of US 10 was redesignated M-54 and its business loop was renumbered to match.[5][6]


Major intersections
The entire highway was in Genesee County.

Location Mile[1] km Destinations Notes
Mount Morris Township 0.000 0.000 US 10 (Dort Highway)
Flint 0.675 1.086 M‑21 west (Court Street) – Grand Rapids, Lansing Northern partner of a one-way pairing
9.756 15.701 M‑21 east (5th Street) – Port Huron Southern partner of a one-way pairing
Grand Blanc Township 14.767 23.765 US 10 (Dort Highway)
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

Pontiac[edit]


Business US Highway 10
Location: Pontiac
Length: 6.925 mi[1] (11.145 km)
Existed: 1961–1986

BUS US 10 was an approximately seven-mile-long (11 km) business route running in Pontiac. It was redesignated in 1986 as a business route of US 24.

Previous to the 1986 truncation of US 10 to Bay City, it was BUS US 10. BUS US 24 was first a business route of US 10 in 1961 when US 10 was relocated out of downtown Pontiac. In 1970, when US 10 was transferred off Woodward Avenue to the Lodge Freeway, the section of Square Lake Rd. that carried US 10 was transferred to BUS US 10 so that the business route would remain a complete loop back to US 10.

The northern terminus of BUS US 24 is at the intersection with US 24 and Dixie Highway northwest of Pontiac. The southern terminus is at the intersection with US 24 and Square Lake Rd. south of Pontiac.

Major intersections
The entire highway was in Oakland County.

Location Mile[1] km Destinations Notes
Waterford Township 0.000 0.000 US 10 (Telegraph Road) Roadway continued as US 10 on Dixie Highway
Pontiac 2.390 3.846 BL I‑75 south (Woodward Avenue /The Loop) Northern end of BL I-75 concurrency around the one-way Loop portion of Woodward Avenue
2.804 4.513 M‑59 (Hall Street)
5.356 8.620 BL I‑75 (Woodward Avenue /The Loop) Southern end of the Loop portion of Woodward Avenue
Bloomfield Township 5.638 9.073 BL I‑75 south (Square Lake Road east)
M‑1 south (Woodward Avenue) – Detroit
Southern end of BL I-75 concurrency; northern terminus of M-1
6.925 11.145 US 10 (Telegraph Road)
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi


See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i Michigan Department of Transportation (2009). MDOT Physical Reference Finder Application (Map). Cartography by Michigan Center for Geographic Information. http://www.mcgi.state.mi.us/prfinder/. Retrieved April 29, 2012.
  2. ^ Michigan State Highway Department (1960). Official Highway Map (Map). Section I9. (Includes all changes through July 1, 1960)
  3. ^ Michigan State Highway Department (1961). Official Highway Map (Map). Section I9. (Includes all changes through July 1, 1961)
  4. ^ Richardson, Anita (April 24, 2014). "Midland Roundabout Construction to Begin April 28, Weather Permitting" (Press release). Michigan Department of Transportation. Retrieved September 17, 2014. 
  5. ^ a b c Michigan State Highway Department (1962). Official Highway Map (Map). Section K12.
  6. ^ a b Michigan State Highway Department (1963). Official Highway Map (Map). Section K12.
  7. ^ a b Michigan State Highway Department (June 1, 1942). 1942 Official Michigan Highway Map (Map). Cartography by Rand McNally (Summer ed.). Section K12.
  8. ^ Google Inc. "Overview Map of Former BUS US 10". Google Maps (Map). Cartography by Google, Inc. https://www.google.com/maps/dir/43.1513031,-83.6947026/42.9466157,-83.6531563/@43.0286,-83.6727535,12z/data=!4m29!4m28!1m25!3m4!1m2!1d-83.6944117!2d43.1172372!3s0x882385cb4b9cf85d:0xc3a65ad55a9bb45!3m4!1m2!1d-83.6941604!2d43.0858621!3s0x8823840dcd211fc1:0xe9115fa76e6d2dcd!3m4!1m2!1d-83.6939039!2d43.0402102!3s0x882383cb523c027f:0x5b026b96034e146c!3m4!1m2!1d-83.6780705!2d42.9973464!3s0x882378ab260f7cb1:0x79a05e83f12a7cd4!3m4!1m2!1d-83.6693403!2d42.961726!3s0x88237f282f2af477:0xd76ab1b8fa12509d!1m0!3e0. Retrieved May 1, 2012.
  9. ^ Barnett, LeRoy (2004). A Drive Down Memory Lane: The Named State and Federal Highways of Michigan. Allegan Forest, MI: Priscilla Press. pp. 192–3. ISBN 1-886167-24-9. 
  10. ^ "Michigan May Do Well Following Wisconsin's Road Marking System". The Grand Rapids Press. September 20, 1919. p. 10. 
  11. ^ Michigan State Highway Department (July 1, 1919). State of Michigan: Lower Peninsula (Map). Cartography by MSHD.
  12. ^ Bureau of Public Roads (November 11, 1926). United States System of Highways Adopted for Uniform Marking by the American Association of State Highway Officials (Map). 1:7,000,000. Cartography by U.S. Geological Survey. OCLC 32889555. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth298433/m1/1/zoom/. Retrieved November 7, 2013.