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Business routes of U.S. Route 10 in Michigan

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US Highway 10 marker

US Highway 10
Highway system

There are three business routes of US Highway 10 in the state of Michigan. They serve as connections from the main highway into Reed City, Clare and Midland. Additionally, there were another two business routes that connected US Highway 10 (US 10) to the downtowns of Flint and Pontiac. All of these business routes are, or were, former sections of US 10 that were marked Business US Highway 10 (Bus. US 10) after the main highway was realigned to bypass the downtowns of the cities.

The Reed City Bus. US 10 was created by 1960 to follow Chestnut and Church streets into the community's central business district and through adjacent residential areas. In 1975 when US 10 was rerouted to follow the freeways around Clare, the former routing through downtown on McEwan and Fifth streets was redesignated as a business loop; it was also signed to provide connections between US 10 and what is now US 127 because of an incomplete interchange between those two freeways. The Midland business loop dates back to 1961 and follows Eastman Avenue and two sets of one-way streets before completing its routing as a freeway. The two business loops created for Flint and Pontiac were designated in 1941 and 1961, respectively. They followed streets that were once part of US 10, but after additional changes to US 10's routing in Michigan, they were renumbered as business loops of other highways in 1962 and 1986, respectively. Near Flint, part of US 10 was replaced by M-54 when the US Highway was moved to a freeway, and near Pontiac it was replaced by US 24 after US 10 was truncated in the state.

Reed City[edit]


Business US Highway 10
Location: Reed City
Length: 2.095 mi[1] (3.372 km)
Existed: By 1960[2][3]–present

Business US Highway 10 (Bus. US 10) is a business loop running for about 2.1 miles (3.4 km) in Reed City. Running eastbound, the business loop starts at the corner of US 10 and Chestnut Street and runs southward along the latter into downtown. Chestnut Street is old US 131 and passes through some residential neighborhoods. It also crosses the Hersey River and the Pere Marquette State Trail while running parallel to the White Pine Trail along its western half. At the intersection with Church Street near Reed City High School, Bus. US 10 turns eastward. The business loop continues easterly out of downtown and angles northeasterly before crossing the Hersey River and the Pere Marquette State Trail again. Immediately to the northeast of the river crossing, Bus. US 10 intersects its parent highway and terminates. The entire route of the highway follows two-lane streets through town.[4][5] According to the Michigan Department of Transportation, the agency which maintains the roadway, between 1,949 and 5,499 vehicles per day used the business loop on average daily in 2013.[6]

In 1919 when the state highway system was first numbered,[7] the east–west highway running through Reed City was numbered M-20,[8] and it was renumbered to US 10 seven years later when the United States Numbered Highway System was created.[9] The business loop was created after US 10 was was moved to bypass downtown Reed City in the late 1950s. This realignment was completed, and the business loop commissioned, by 1960.[2][3] Until 1986, the western half of the loop along Chestnut Street ran concurrently with US 131 until that highway was moved to its current freeway routing.[10][11]

Major intersections
The entire highway is in Reed City, Osceola County.

mi[1] km Destinations Notes
0.000 0.000 US 10 – Ludington, Clare
Old US 131 north
Roadway continues northward as Old US 131
0.227 0.365 Mackinac Trail Connector from westbound Bus. US 10 to eastbound US 10
1.011 1.627 Chestnut Street south
Church Street west
Bus. US 10 transitions between Chestnut and Church streets; Chestnut Street south is old US 131
2.095 3.372 US 10 – Ludington, Clare
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi


Clare[edit]


Business US Highway 10
Location: Clare
Length: 5.002 mi[1] (8.050 km)
Existed: 1975[12][13]–present

Business US Highway 10 (Bus. US 10) is a business loop in Clare that is just over 5.0 miles (8.0 km) long. From its western end, it branches off its parent highway, US 10 and runs southward into the city of Clare. Because US 10 runs concurrently with US 127 on the northern and eastern sides of Clare, Bus. US 10 is also concurrent with Bus. US 127 on its western leg. Bus. US 10/Bus. US 127 follows McEwan Street southward over the South Branch of the Tobacco River and through a residential area on the north side of the city. Several blocks further south, the highway enters the downtown district and turns onto 5th Streets, separating from Bus. US 127.[14][15]

Fifth Street continues eastward and then southeasterly out of downtown and through residential areas. At Clarabella Road, the business loop crosses from Clare County into Isabella County before passing under the US 127 freeway without an interchange. Bus. US 10 runs parallel to the Pere Marquette Rail-Trail on Saginaw Road in a rural section of Isabella County before terminating at an interchange that connects it to eastbound US 10 in Wise Township. Through the city, the business loop has four lanes for traffic, but the rural segment in Isabella County has two.[14][15] According to the Michigan Department of Transportation, the agency which maintains the roadway, between 4,035 and 6,540 vehicles per day used the business loop on average daily in 2013.[6]

In 1919 when the state highway system was first numbered,[7] the east–west highway running through Clare was numbered M-20,[8] and it was renumbered to US 10 seven years later when the United States Numbered Highway System was created.[9] In late 1961, the US 10 freeway east of the city to Midland was finished, but the route through downtown remained part of US 10.[16][17] A freeway bypass north of Clare and Farwell opened in 1975, and US 10 was rerouted along the then-US 27 freeway to connect from the new bypass to the existing freeway east of the city, bypassing both cities. The section of US 10 in downtown Clare was designated Bus. US 10 at this time, running along then-Bus. US 27 to connect to US 27/US 10 north of downtown.[12][13] The section of former US 10 between Farwell and Clare became an extended M-115 in 1989.[18][19] In 2002, US 27 in Michigan was renumbered to US 127,[20] and the business loops were renumbered accordingly.[21]

Major intersections

County Location mi[1] km Destinations Notes
Clare GrantSheridan township line 0.000 0.000 US 127 / US 10 – Mackinac Bridge, Lansing, Midland

Bus. US 127 south
Clare Avenue north
Common terminus for both Bus. US 127 and Bus. US 10; exit 160 on US 127/US 10; roadway continues northward as Clare Avenue
Clare 1.716 2.762
Bus. US 127 south (McEwan Street south) – Lansing
M‑115 west – Farwell
Southern end of Bus. US 127 concurrency; eastern terminus of M-115
Isabella Wise Township 5.002 8.050 US 10 east – Midland Eastbound exit and westbound entrance only
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi


Midland[edit]


Business US Highway 10
Location: Midland
Length: 7.200 mi[1] (11.587 km)
Existed: c. 1961[22][23]–present

Business US Highway 10 (Bus. US 10) is a business loop running for 7.2 miles (11.6 km) in Midland in Midland County. The highway starts at exit 122 on US 10 north of downtown near the Midland Mall. The business loop runs southward along the four lanes of Eastman Avenue through residential neighborhoods and past the Midland Country Club and the Midland Center for the Arts. Further south, the business loop splits to follow the one-way pairing of Buttles Street (eastbound) and Indian Street (westbound); these two streets run northwest-to-southeast parallel to the Tittabawassee River. At Jerome Street, M-20 merges onto the business loop. The two highways run concurrently from this point eastward. On the eastern edge of downtown, Bus. US 10/M-20 passes Dow Diamond, home of the Great Lakes Loons, a minor-legaue baseball team, and then the highway turns northeasterly. East of Jefferson Avenue, Bus. US 10/M-20 turns east–west along the one-way pairing of Lyon Road (eastbound) and Patrick Road (westbound).[24][25]

East of Washington Street and Saginaw Road, the highway transitions from one-way streets to a freeway; the transition between the eastbound freeway and Patrick Road passes through a roundabout in the Saginaw Road interchange. As the freeway continues eastward, there is a partial interchange for Waldo Road, and then the highway crosses into the section of Midland that is located in Bay County. Immediately east of the county line, Bus. US 10 and M-20 jointly terminate at a directional interchange with US 10; traffic on the eastbound business loop defaults onto eastbound US 10, and traffic on the westbound business loop originates on westbound US 10.[24][25] According to the Michigan Department of Transportation, the agency which maintains the roadway, between 7,317 and 23,733 vehicles per day used the business loop on average daily in 2013.[6] The section of Bus. US 10 that runs concurrently with M-20 has been listed on the National Highway System,[26] a network of roads important to the country's economy, defense, and mobility.[27]

In 1919 when the state highway system was first numbered,[7] the east–west highways connecting at Midland were numbered M-20 and M-24.[8] M-20 to the northwest of the city along with M-24 to the southeast (along what is today M-47) were renumbered to US 10 seven years later when the United States Numbered Highway System was created.[9] Afterward, M-24 west of Midland became part of M-20.[28] By the middle of the 1930s, US 10 was shifted to bypass downtown Midland, and the former route on the west side of town was numbered US 10A.[29] At the end of the 1950s, M-20 east of Midland to Bay City was converted to a freeway,[22][30] By the middle of 1961, the freeway bypass of Midland was completed, and the business loop was designated along the former US 10A and part of M-20; at the same time, US 10 was rerouted to replace M-20 east of Midland to Bay City[22][23]
Major intersections
The entire highway is in Midland. All exits are unnumbered.

County mi[1] km Destinations Notes
Midland 0.000–
0.117
0.000–
0.188
US 10 – Clare, Bay City
2.853 4.591 M‑20 west (Jerome Street) – Mt. Pleasant Western end of M-20 concurrency
4.595 7.395 Western end of freeway
4.866 7.831 Saginaw Road Eastbound exit and westbound entrance are via roundabout with Patrick Road, which replaced an existing intersection in mid-2014[31]
6.037 9.716 Waldo Road Westbound exit and eastbound entrance only
Bay 7.200 11.587 M‑20 west
US 10 – Bay City
Eastern terminus of Bus. US 10 and M-20; westbound exit and eastbound entrance only
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

Flint[edit]


Business US Highway 10
Location: Grand BlancMount Morris
Length: 14.767 mi[1] (23.765 km)
Existed: 1941[34][35]–1962[32][33]

Business US Highway 10 (Bus. US 10 ) was a business loop in the Flint area. It ran for about 14.8 miles (23.8 km) along Saginaw Road, which was also called Saginaw Street in the city of Flint. The highway connected to its parent in Mount Morris Township and ran southerly along Saginaw Road through Mount Morris. From there the business loop paralleled what is now I-475 into the city of Flint on Saginaw Street. In downtown, the loop crossed the Flint River. There were intersections with both directions of M-21; eastbound M-21 was routed on 5th Street while westbound traffic followed Court Street one block north. South of downtown, Bus. US 10 turned southeasterly to run through suburban Burton before terminating at an intersection with US 10 (Dort Highway) near Grand Blanc in Grand Blanc Township. Saginaw Road was a multi-lane undivided street for its length at the time it was Bus. US 10[32][36]

Originally, Saginaw Road in the Flint area was a part of the Saginaw Trail, a Native American foot path in the area.[37] When the state signed its highway system in 1919,[7] Saginaw Road was part of M-10.[8] Later it was used as a section of US 10 in 1926.[9] By 1930, the main highway was moved eastward to follow Dort Highway, and the route through the city was designated M-10.[38] It was renumbered to Bus. US 10 in 1941.[34][35] Later, in 1962, US 10 was moved again to follow the recently completed I-75 freeway; the former route of US 10 was redesignated M-54 and its business loop was renumbered to match.[32][33]
Major intersections
The entire highway was in Genesee County.

Location mi[1] km Destinations Notes
Mount Morris Township 0.000 0.000 US 10 (Dort Highway)
Flint 9.675 15.570 M‑21 west (Court Street) – Grand Rapids, Lansing Westbound half of a one-way pairing for M-21
9.756 15.701 M‑21 east (5th Street) – Port Huron Eastbound half of a one-way pairing for M-21
Grand Blanc Township 14.767 23.765 US 10 (Dort Highway)
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

Pontiac[edit]


Business US Highway 10
Location: Pontiac
Length: 6.925 mi[1] (11.145 km)
Existed: c. 1961[41][42]–1986[39][40]

Business US Highway 10 (Bus. US 10) was an approximately 6.9-mile-long (11.1 km) business loop running in Pontiac. It was redesignated in 1986 as a business route of US 24 after US 10 was truncated to Bay City. The roadways it used were at four lanes where they carried two-way traffic, and two or three lanes where they carried one-way traffic through the area.

Bus. US 10 started northwest of downtown at the intersection of Telegraph Road and Dixie Highway in Waterford Township before crossing into the City of Pontiac. From there, the highway followed Dixie Highway southeasterly bordered by residential neighborhoods to the north and rail yards to the south of the four-lane street. From the intersection with Woodcalm Street southward, the eastbound direction branched off to follow Cass Avenue two blocks to the south of Oakland Avenue. At the northern end of downtown, Bus. US 10 merged onto a loop formed by Wide Track Drive around the downtown core southward to Woodward Avenue. The loop is shaped like an upside-down tear drop that is about four blocks wide at the northern end tapering to a single intersection at the south. Wide Track Drive also carried the two directions of Business Loop Interstate 75 (BL I-75) around downtown Pontiac between Woodward Avenue and Perry Street. The two directions of BL I-75/Bus. US 10 intersected M-59 on opposite sides of the central business district at Huron Street. The business loop continued southward along Wide Track Drive to the intersection that marked the northern end of Woodward Avenue. From there, BL I-75/Bus. US 10 followed Woodward south past the hospital and out of the City of Pontiac. South of the city limits, the roadway was bordered by residential subdivisions. At Square Lake Road, Bus US 10 turned westward, BL I-75 turned eastward and M-1 continued south on Woodward Avenue. Bus. US 10 followed Square Lake Road for about 1.3 miles (2.1 km) before terminating at an intersection with US 10 (Telegraph Road).[39][43]

In 1919 when the state highway system was first numbered,[7] the north–south highway through Pontiac was numbered M-10,[8] and it was renumbered to US 10 seven years later when the United States Numbered Highway System was created.[9] A number of highway designation and routing changes in the Pontiac were made when US 10 was shifted out of downtown to replace M-58 along Telegraph Road west of downtown by the middle of 1961. Before the change, US 10 followed Dixie Highway and Oakland Avenue southeast into Pontiac to Perry Street and then Perry to Woodward while M-58 was routed along Telegraph and Square Lake Roads. After the change, US 10 turned south from Dixie Highway onto Telegraph and then east onto Square Lake to connect back to Woodward. The old route through downtown was assigned the Bus. US 10 moniker and M-58 was decommissioned as a highway designation.[41][42] Nine years later, US 10 was moved off Woodward Avenue between Pontiac and Detroit to follow the Lodge Freeway and Telegraph Road. Bus. US 10 was extended westward along Square Lake Road from the intersection of Woodward Avenue to the junction with Telegraph Road so that it would continue to connect with its parent highway on the southern end.[44][45] In 1985, the Michigan Department of Transportation received permission from the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials to truncate US 10 to Bay City,[46] and when the change was made the following year, US 24 replaced US 10 on Telegraph Road north of Square Lake Road, and Bus. US 10 through downtown was redesignated Bus. US 24.[39][40]
Major intersections
The entire highway was in Oakland County.

Location mi[1] km Destinations Notes
Waterford Township 0.000 0.000 US 10 (Dixie Highway, Telegraph Road) Roadway continued as US 10 on Dixie Highway
Pontiac 2.390 3.846 BL I‑75 (Wide Track Drive) Northern end of BL I-75 concurrency around the one-way Wide Track Drive
2.804 4.513 M‑59 (Huron Street)
5.356 8.620 Southern end of the Wide Track Drive; northern end of Woodward Avenue
Bloomfield Township 5.638 9.073 BL I‑75 south (Square Lake Road east)
M‑1 south (Woodward Avenue) – Detroit
Southern end of BL I-75 concurrency; northern terminus of M-1
6.925 11.145 US 10 (Telegraph Road)
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Michigan Department of Transportation & Michigan Center for Shared Solutions and Technology Partnerships (2009). MDOT Physical Reference Finder Application (Map). Michigan Department of Transportation. Retrieved April 29, 2012. 
  2. ^ a b Michigan State Highway Department (1958). Official Highway Map (Map). Scale not given. Lansing: Michigan State Highway Department. § I9. OCLC 51856742.  (Includes all changes through July 1, 1958)
  3. ^ a b Michigan State Highway Department (1960). Official Highway Map (Map). Scale not given. Lansing: Michigan State Highway Department. § I9. OCLC 81552576.  (Includes all changes through July 1, 1960)
  4. ^ Michigan Department of Transportation (2014). Pure Michigan: State Transportation Map (Map). 1 in≈15 mi / 1 cm≈9 km. Lansing: Michigan Department of Transportation. § I9. OCLC 900162490. 
  5. ^ Google (April 6, 2015). "Overview Map of Bus. US 10 in Reed City" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved April 6, 2015. 
  6. ^ a b c Bureau of Transportation Planning (2008). "Traffic Monitoring Information System". Michigan Department of Transportation. Retrieved April 7, 2015. 
  7. ^ a b c d e "Michigan May Do Well Following Wisconsin's Road Marking System". The Grand Rapids Press. September 20, 1919. p. 10. OCLC 9975013. 
  8. ^ a b c d e Michigan State Highway Department (July 1, 1919). State of Michigan: Lower Peninsula (Map). Scale not given. Lansing: Michigan State Highway Department. OCLC 15607244. 
  9. ^ a b c d e Bureau of Public Roads & American Association of State Highway Officials (November 11, 1926). United States System of Highways Adopted for Uniform Marking by the American Association of State Highway Officials (Map). 1:7,000,000. Washington, DC: U.S. Geological Survey. OCLC 32889555. Retrieved November 7, 2013 – via University of North Texas Libraries. 
  10. ^ Michigan Department of Transportation (1986). Official Transportation Map (Map). 1 in≈14.5 mi / 1 in≈23 km. Lansing: Michigan Department of Transportation. § I9. 
  11. ^ Michigan Department of Transportation (1987). Official Transportation Map (Map). 1 in≈14.5 mi / 1 in≈23 km. Lansing: Michigan Department of Transportation. § I9. 
  12. ^ a b Michigan Department of State Highways and Transportation (1975). Official Transportation Map (Map). 1 in≈14.5 mi / 1 in≈23 km. Lansing: Michigan Department of State Highways and Transportation. § I10. OCLC 320798754. 
  13. ^ a b Michigan Department of State Highways and Transportation (1976). Official Transportation Map (Map) (1976–77 ed.). 1 in≈14.5 mi / 1 in≈23 km. Lansing: Michigan Department of State Highways and Transportation. § I10. 
  14. ^ a b Michigan Department of Transportation (2014). Pure Michigan: State Transportation Map (Map). 1 in≈15 mi / 1 cm≈9 km. Lansing: Michigan Department of Transportation. § I10. OCLC 900162490. 
  15. ^ a b Google (April 6, 2015). "Overview Map of Bus. US 10 in Clare, Michigan" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved April 6, 2015. 
  16. ^ Michigan State Highway Department (1961). Official Highway Map (Map). Scale not given. Lansing: Michigan State Highway Department. § I10. OCLC 51857665.  (Includes all changes through July 1, 1961)
  17. ^ Michigan State Highway Department (1962). Official Highway Map (Map). Scale not given. Lansing: Michigan State Highway Department. § I10. OCLC 173191490. 
  18. ^ Michigan Department of Transportation (1989). Michigan Department of Transportation Map (Map). 1 in≈14.5 mi / 1 in≈23 km. Lansing: Michigan Department of Transportation. § I10. 
  19. ^ Michigan Department of Transportation (1990). Michigan Department of Transportation Map (Map). 1 in≈14.5 mi / 1 in≈23 km. Lansing: Michigan Department of Transportation. § I10. 
  20. ^ Ranzenberger, Mark (April 27, 2008). "US 127 Signs Getting Updated". The Morning Sun (Mount Pleasant, MI). pp. 1, 6. OCLC 22378715. Retrieved August 23, 2012. 
  21. ^ Michigan Department of Transportation (2003). Official Department of Transportation Map (Map) (2003–04 ed.). 1 in≈14.5 mi / 1 cm≈9 km. Lansing: Michigan Department of Transportation. § I10. 
  22. ^ a b c Michigan State Highway Department (1960). Official Highway Map (Map). Scale not given. Lansing: Michigan State Highway Department. § J11. OCLC 81552576.  (Includes all changes through July 1, 1960)
  23. ^ a b Michigan State Highway Department (1961). Official Highway Map (Map). Scale not given. Lansing: Michigan State Highway Department. § J11. OCLC 51857665.  (Includes all changes through July 1, 1961)
  24. ^ a b Michigan Department of Transportation (2014). Pure Michigan: State Transportation Map (Map). 1 in≈3.5 mi / 1 cm≈2 km. Lansing: Michigan Department of Transportation. Midland inset. OCLC 900162490. 
  25. ^ a b Google (April 6, 2015). "Overview Map of Bus. US 10 in Midland" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved April 6, 2015. 
  26. ^ Michigan Department of Transportation (2005). National Highway System: Bay City Urbanized Area (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Lansing: Michigan Department of Transportation. Retrieved April 7, 2015. 
  27. ^ Natzke, Stefan; Neathery, Mike & Adderly, Kevin (June 20, 2012). "What is the National Highway System?". National Highway System. Federal Highway Administration. Retrieved July 1, 2012. 
  28. ^ Michigan State Highway Department (December 1, 1926). Official Highway Condition Map (Map). Scale not given. Lansing: Michigan State Highway Department. OCLC 79754957. 
  29. ^ Michigan State Highway Department & Rand McNally (June 1, 1936). Official Michigan Highway Map (Map). Scale not given. Lansing: Michigan State Highway Department. § J11. 
  30. ^ Michigan State Highway Department (1958). Official Highway Map (Map). Scale not given. Lansing: Michigan State Highway Department. § J11. OCLC 51856742.  (Includes all changes through July 1, 1958)
  31. ^ Richardson, Anita (April 24, 2014). "Midland Roundabout Construction to Begin April 28, Weather Permitting" (Press release). Michigan Department of Transportation. Retrieved September 17, 2014. 
  32. ^ a b c Michigan State Highway Department (1962). Official Highway Map (Map). Scale not given. Lansing: Michigan State Highway Department. § K12. OCLC 173191490. 
  33. ^ a b Michigan State Highway Department (1963). Official Highway Map (Map). Scale not given. Lansing: Michigan State Highway Department. § K12. 
  34. ^ a b Michigan State Highway Department & Rand McNally (March 21, 1941). Official Michigan Highway Map (Map) (Spring ed.). Scale not given. Lansing: Michigan State Highway Department. § K12. 
  35. ^ a b Michigan State Highway Department & Rand McNally (July 1, 1941). Official Michigan Highway Map (Map) (Summer ed.). Scale not given. Lansing: Michigan State Highway Department. § K12. 
  36. ^ Google (May 1, 2012). "Overview Map of Former Bus. US 10 in Flint" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved May 1, 2012. 
  37. ^ Barnett, LeRoy (2004). A Drive Down Memory Lane: The Named State and Federal Highways of Michigan. Allegan Forest, MI: Priscilla Press. pp. 192–3. ISBN 1-886167-24-9. 
  38. ^ Michigan State Highway Department & H.M. Gousha (January 1, 1930). Official Highway Service Map (Map). Scale not given. Lansing: Michigan State Highway Department. 
  39. ^ a b c Michigan Department of Transportation (1986). Official Transportation Map (Map). 1 in≈2.5 mi. Lansing: Michigan Department of Transportation. Detroit and Vicinity inset. §§ A6–B7. 
  40. ^ a b Michigan Department of Transportation (1987). Official Transportation Map (Map). 1 in≈2.5 mi. Lansing: Michigan Department of Transportation. Detroit and Vicinity inset. §§ A6–B7. 
  41. ^ a b Michigan State Highway Department (1960). Official Highway Map (Map). Scale not given. Lansing: Michigan State Highway Department. Pontiac inset. OCLC 81552576.  (Includes all changes through July 1, 1960)
  42. ^ a b Michigan State Highway Department (1961). Official Highway Map (Map). Scale not given. Lansing: Michigan State Highway Department. Detroit Metropolitan Area inset. §§ A5–B6. OCLC 51857665.  (Includes all changes through July 1, 1961)
  43. ^ Google (April 6, 2015). "Overview Map of Former Bus. US 10 in Pontiac" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved April 6, 2015. 
  44. ^ Michigan Department of State Highways (1970). Official Highway Map (Map). 1 in≈2.5 mi. Lansing: Michigan Department of State Highways. Detroit and Vicinity inset. §§ B6–E9. 
  45. ^ Michigan Department of State Highways (1971). Official Highway Map (Map). 1 in≈2.5 mi. Lansing: Michigan Department of State Highways. Detroit and Vicinity inset. §§ B6–E9. OCLC 77960415. 
  46. ^ Special Committee on U.S. Route Numbering (October 11, 1985). Route Numbering Committee Agenda (PDF) (Report). Seattle, WA: American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials – via Wikimedia Commons. 

External links[edit]

Route map: Bing