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U.S. Route 195

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U.S. Route 195 marker

U.S. Route 195
US 195 is highlighted in red.
Route information
Auxiliary route of US 95
Maintained by ITD and WSDOT
Length: 94.42 mi[a] (151.95 km)
Existed: November 11, 1926[1] – present
Tourist
routes:
Palouse Scenic Byway
Major junctions
South end: US-95 near Lewiston, ID
  SR 27 near Pullman, WA
SR 26 in Colfax, WA
SR 23 in Steptoe, WA
North end: I‑90 / US 2 / US 395 in Spokane, WA
Location
States: Idaho, Washington
Counties: ID: Nez Perce
WA: Whitman, Spokane
Highway system
State Highways in Idaho
SH-162 ID SH-200
SR 194 WA US 197

U.S. Route 195 (US 195) is a north–south United States Highway, of which all but 0.65 miles of its 94.42 miles (1.05 of 151.95 km) are within the state of Washington. The highway starts in rural Idaho north of the city of Lewiston as a state highway in an interchange with US 95. As the road crosses into Washington it becomes a state highway that connects communities in the Palouse region of Eastern Washington. US 195 travels north, serving the cities of Pullman, Colfax and Rosalia in Whitman County before continuing into Spokane County to its terminus in the city of Spokane at an interchange with Interstate 90 (I-90).

The first section of US 195 designated as part of Washington's state highway system was codified in 1913 from Colfax to Spokane as the Inland Empire Highway and from the Idaho state line to Pullman as the Second Division of the Eastern Route of the Inland Empire Highway. The two highways were included as part of State Road 3 in 1923 and US 195 during the creation of the US Highway System on November 11, 1926. Originally, the northern terminus of the highway was at US 95 in Sandpoint, but was truncated to Spokane after US 2 was extended west from Bonners Ferry in 1946. US 195 was cosigned with Primary State Highway 3 (PSH 3) from US 95 to Spokane and PSH 6 from Spokane to Newport from the creation of the primary and secondary state highways in 1937 until the 1964 highway renumbering. US 195 was extended south into Idaho after the relocation of US 95, designated as the North and South Highway in 1916, onto its present freeway in 1975. Bypasses of Pullman, Rosalia, and Plaza were completed during the early 1970s, converting portions of US 195 into a divided highway.

Route description[edit]

US 195 runs 94.42 miles (151.95 km) in Idaho and Washington and is listed in its entirety as part of the National Highway System,[3][4] a system of roads crucial to the nation's economy, defense and mobility.[5] As a state highway in both states, the roadway is maintained by the Idaho Transportation Department (ITD) and Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT).[2]

Idaho[edit]

US 195 travels within Idaho for 0.653 miles (1.051 km) from an interchange with US 95 to the Washington state line, entirely north of Lewiston atop the Lewiston Hill in unincorporated Nez Perce County.[6][7] ITD surveys the roads under its control on a regular basis to measure the amount of traffic using the state's highways. These traffic counts are expressed in terms of annual average daily traffic (AADT), a calculation of the average daily number of vehicles on a segment of roadway. A July 2011 survey reported average daily traffic of 6,761 vehicles being served the US 95 interchange.[8]

Administratively, US 195 does not exist in Idaho. According to ITD's milepoint log, both carriageways are officially US 95 ramps into Washington state.[9]

Washington[edit]

US 195 traveling along Hangman Creek in Spokane, viewed from the east

US 195 travels 93.37 miles (150.26 km) north through the Palouse region of Eastern Washington, from the Idaho state line north to Spokane.[2] The highway serves as an important link between Pullman and Spokane as well as part of the Palouse Scenic Byway and a main north–south route in the region alongside State Route 27 (SR 27).[10][11][12] US 195 enters Washington north of Clarkston in unincorporated Whitman County and travels west to an intersection with its 0.61-mile-long (0.98 km) spur route, providing a connection to US 95 northbound towards Moscow. The highway continues northwest through farmland and the towns of Uniontown and Colton along Union Flat Creek towards Pullman.[13][14][15] US 195 intersects SR 27, also part of the Palouse Scenic Byway,[11] and travels west of Pullman on a highway bypass of the city. The bypass travels through the termini of SR 194 and SR 270 as it leaves the Pullman area heading north towards Colfax along the South Fork Palouse River.[16][17] US 195 becomes Main Street within Colfax and travels through the town along a WSDOT rail line to the eastern terminus of SR 272 and SR 26.[18][19] The highway continues north along Pine Creek and the WSDOT rail line past the northern terminus of SR 271, a diamond interchange south of Rosalia,[20][21] before leaving the Palouse Scenic Byway at the Spokane County border.[11][12] The roadway heads north through a diamond interchange in Plaza and along Spangle Creek past the community of Spangle.[22][23][24] US 195 enters the city of Spokane as a four-lane highway along Hangman Creek and ends at a partial cloverleaf interchange with I-90, cosigned with US 2 and US 395.[6][25][26]

US 195 is defined by the Washington State Legislature as SR 195, part of the Revised Code of Washington as §47.17.380.[27] Every year, WSDOT conducts a series of surveys on its highways in the state to measure traffic volume. This is expressed in terms of AADT, which is a measure of traffic volume for any average day of the year. In 2012, WSDOT calculated that the busiest section of US 195 within Washington was in Hangman Valley before the I-90 interchange in Spokane, serving 19,000 vehicles, while the least busiest section was between Pullman and Colfax, serving 3,100 vehicles.[28] The entire route of US 195 is designated as a Highway of Statewide Significance by WSDOT,[29] which includes highways that connect major communities in the state of Washington.[30]

History[edit]

The Inland Empire Highway was originally a collection of gravel county roads that have existed since 1898 in the Spokane area and 1905 in the Pullman area.[31][32][33] The highway was added to the state highway system in 1913, traveling within the Palouse region between Colfax and Spokane. The Second Division of the Eastern Route of the Inland Empire Highway was also established in 1913, traveling northwest from Sampson Trail Y at the IdahoWashington state line to Pullman.[34][35] The Idaho portion of US 195 became part of the North and South Highway in 1916 and was not numbered under Idaho's state highway system in 1953.[36][37] The gap in the Second Division between Pullman and Colfax was named by Whitman County as a highway of importance the following year and was not built until 1925 as part of State Road 3.[38][39] State Road 23, connecting Spokane to Newport, was designated in 1915 before it was renamed to the Pend O'Reille Highway and renumbered to State Road 6 in 1923.[40][41][42] The Inland Empire Highway was numbered as State Road 3 in 1923 and retained the designation as PSH 3 in 1937, while State Road 6 became PSH 6.[42][43]

Shields of US 195, circa 1961, and former PSH 3

The United States Highway System was established on November 11, 1926, during its adoption by the American Association of State Highway Officials (AASHO) and included US 195, traveling north from US 95 within Washington through Pullman and Spokane before ending at US 95 in Sandpoint, Idaho.[1][44] The present four-lane divided highway along Hangman Creek in Spokane was constructed in 1939 as part of general improvements to Eastern Washington highways, relocating the route of the creek and a nearby Northern Pacific Railway line.[45] The section of US 195 between Spokane and Sandpoint was replaced by an extension of US 2 from Bonners Ferry, Idaho to Everett, Washington in 1946, truncating the highway to US 10 and US 395.[46] During the 1964 highway renumbering, Washington converted its highways to the present state route system, to take effect in 1970. US 195 replaced PSH 3 and its branches along its present route,[27][47] with its southern terminus at US 95 atop Lewiston Hill in Idaho and its northern terminus at I-90 in Spokane at an interchange that was opened in 1969.[48][49]

The State Department of Highways completed construction of three highway bypasses between 1973 and 1975, avoiding the cities of Pullman, Rosalia, and Plaza,[50][51][52] using funding originally intended for the canceled Bay Freeway project in Seattle.[53][54] US 95 was relocated onto its present freeway, bypassing Washington state, in 1979 and US 195 was extended south into Idaho to the new interchange with a spur route traveling towards northbound US 95.[27][55] The highway between Uniontown and Rosalia was designated as part of the Palouse Scenic Byway on December 19, 2002, as part of the Washington State Scenic and Recreational Highways program.[56][57] WSDOT is, as of March 2013, upgrading US 195 within Spokane in Hangman Valley to a limited-access highway by constructing diamond interchanges and a single point urban interchange at four intersections to be completed in late 2013. The project began with engineering studies in 1999 and progressed to limited access plans in 2002 and construction beginning in 2013 on the interchange with Cheney-Spokane Road.[58][59]

Spur route[edit]


U.S. Route 195 Spur
Location: WashingtonIdaho state line
Length: 0.61 mi[a] (0.98 km)
Existed: 1979–present[27]

US 195 has a 0.61-mile-long (0.98 km) spur route at its southern terminus on the WashingtonIdaho state line that travels east from US 195 to serve US 95 northbound atop Lewiston Hill.[2][7][60] The highway was established in 1979 on the former alignment of US 95 as it passed briefly through Washington before it was moved onto its present freeway.[27][55] WSDOT included the road in its annual AADT survey in 2012 and calculated that 100 vehicles per day used the spur route.[28] ITD designates the spur route as US 95 Spur in their milepoint log.[61]

Major intersections[edit]

County Location mi[b] km Destinations Notes
Nez Perce   0.000 0.000 US-95 south – Lewiston Southern terminus, interchange, northbound entrance and southbound exit
  0.653
0.00
1.051
0.00
Idaho–Washington state line
Whitman   0.37 0.60
US 195 Spur to US 95 north – Moscow
  20.26 32.61 SR 27 north – Pullman
  22.00 35.41 SR 194 west – Almota
  22.75 36.61 SR 270 east – Pullman
Colfax 35.95 57.86 SR 272 east (Canyon Street) – Palouse
36.26 58.35
SR 26 Spur to SR 26 west – Vantage
36.72 59.10 SR 26 west – Vantage
Steptoe 46.13 74.24 SR 23 north – St. John, Sprague
  60.44–
61.88
97.27–
99.59
SR 271 south – Rosalia, Oakesdale Interchange
Spokane Plaza 68.08–
69.26
109.56–
111.46
Plaza Road Interchange
Spokane 93.12–
93.37
149.86–
150.26
I‑90 / US 2 / US 395 – Spokane Airport, Seattle, Spokane Northern terminus, interchange
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b Total mileage is a summation of the state mileages.[2]
  2. ^ Milepost numbers reset at the Idaho–Washington state line crossing.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Weingroff, Richard F. (January 9, 2009). "From Names to Numbers: The Origins of the U.S. Numbered Highway System". Highway History. Federal Highway Administration. Retrieved March 2, 2013. 
  2. ^ a b c d e Staff (2012). "State Highway Log: Planning Report 2012, SR 2 to SR 971" (PDF). Washington State Department of Transportation. pp. 1197–1211. Retrieved March 2, 2013. 
  3. ^ National Highway System: Idaho (PDF) (Map). Federal Highway Administration. October 1, 2012. Retrieved March 2, 2013. 
  4. ^ National Highway System: Washington (PDF) (Map). Federal Highway Administration. October 1, 2012. Retrieved March 2, 2013. 
  5. ^ Natzke, Stefan; Neathery, Mike & Adderly, Kevin (August 26, 2010). "What is the National Highway System?". National Highway System. Federal Highway Administration. Retrieved December 12, 2010. 
  6. ^ a b Google (July 18, 2008). "U.S. Route 195" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved July 18, 2008. 
  7. ^ a b "Feature Detail Report for: Lewiston Hill". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. June 21, 1979. 
  8. ^ "Highway Data Quest". Idaho Transportation Department. July 19, 2011. Retrieved March 2, 2013. 
  9. ^ "Milepoint Log - State Highway System" (PDF). Idaho Transportation Department. March 19, 2014. p. 328. Retrieved April 15, 2014. 
  10. ^ Washington State Highways, 2011–2012 (PDF) (Map). 1:842,000. Washington State Department of Transportation. 2011. Retrieved March 2, 2013. 
  11. ^ a b c Washington State Highways, 2006–07: Scenic Byways (PDF) (Map). 1:842,000. Washington State Department of Transportation. 2006. Retrieved March 2, 2013. 
  12. ^ a b "47.39.020: Designation of portions of existing highways and ferry routes as part of system.". Revised Code of Washington. Washington State Legislature. Retrieved March 2, 2013. 
  13. ^ "Feature Detail Report for: Union Flat Creek". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. September 10, 1979. Retrieved March 2, 2013. 
  14. ^ "Feature Detail Report for: Uniontown". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. September 10, 1979. Retrieved March 2, 2013. 
  15. ^ "Feature Detail Report for: Colton". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. September 10, 1979. Retrieved March 2, 2013. 
  16. ^ "SR 195: Junction SR 270" (PDF). Washington State Department of Transportation. September 6, 2004. Retrieved March 2, 2013. 
  17. ^ "Feature Detail Report for: South Fork Palouse River". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. June 21, 1979. Retrieved March 2, 2013. 
  18. ^ 2011 Washington State Rail System (PDF) (Map). Washington State Department of Transportation. January 2012. Retrieved March 2, 2013. 
  19. ^ "SR 195: Junction SR 26/SR 26 SP Colfax" (PDF). Washington State Department of Transportation. August 23, 2002. Retrieved March 2, 2013. 
  20. ^ "Feature Detail Report for: Rosalia". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. September 10, 1979. Retrieved March 2, 2013. 
  21. ^ "SR 195: Junction SR 271" (PDF). Washington State Department of Transportation. October 15, 2001. Retrieved March 2, 2013. 
  22. ^ "SR 195: Junction Cheney Plaza Road" (PDF). Washington State Department of Transportation. November 2, 1995. Retrieved March 2, 2013. 
  23. ^ "Feature Detail Report for: Spangle Creek". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. September 10, 1979. Retrieved March 2, 2013. 
  24. ^ "Feature Detail Report for: Spangle Creek". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. September 10, 1979. Retrieved March 2, 2013. 
  25. ^ "Feature Detail Report for: Spokane". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. September 10, 1979. Retrieved March 2, 2013. 
  26. ^ "SR 90: Junction SR 195" (PDF). Washington State Department of Transportation. October 12, 2004. Retrieved March 2, 2013. 
  27. ^ a b c d e "47.17.380: State route No. 195". Revised Code of Washington. Washington State Legislature. Retrieved March 2, 2013. 
  28. ^ a b Staff (2012). "2012 Annual Traffic Report" (PDF). Washington State Department of Transportation. pp. 154–155. Retrieved March 23, 2013. 
  29. ^ "Transportation Commission List of Highways of Statewide Significance" (PDF). Washington State Transportation Commission. July 26, 2009. Retrieved March 2, 2013. 
  30. ^ Lorenzo, Judy. "Highways of Statewide Significance". Washington State Department of Transportation. Retrieved March 2, 2013. 
  31. ^ Washington-Idaho: Spokane Quadrangle (JPG) (Map). 1:125,000. United States Geological Survey. May 1901. Retrieved March 2, 2013. 
  32. ^ Washington-Idaho: Oakesdale Quadrangle (JPG) (Map). 1:125,000. United States Geological Survey. October 1905. Retrieved March 2, 2013. 
  33. ^ Washington-Idaho: Pullman Quadrangle (JPG) (Map). 1:125,000. United States Geological Survey. December 1910. Retrieved March 2, 2013. 
  34. ^ Washington State Legislature (March 12, 1913). "Chapter 65: Classifying Public Highways". Session Laws of the State of Washington. Session Laws of the State of Washington (1913 ed.). Olympia, Washington: Washington State Legislature. pp. 221–222. Retrieved March 2, 2013. A highway connecting with the Sunset Highway at or in the vicinity of the city of Ellensburg; thence by way of North Yakima, Kennewick, Pasco, Walla Walla, Dayton, crossing the Snake River at either Almota or Penawawa, Colfax, Rosalia, Spokane, Deer Park, Loon Lake, Colville, to the international line at boundary, which shall be known as the Inland Empire Highway. 
  35. ^ Rand McNally Junior Road Map of Idaho (Map). Rand McNally. 1926. Retrieved March 2, 2013. 
  36. ^ Motor West, Volume 21. November 1, 1916. p. 21. Retrieved March 2, 2013. 
  37. ^ "Minutes of the Idaho Board of Highway Directors and the Idaho Transportation Board" (PDF). Idaho Transportation Department. July 25, 1953. p. 63. Retrieved March 2, 2013. 
  38. ^ "Favors East Division Road". The Spokesman-Review. November 8, 1914. p. 3. Retrieved March 2, 2013. 
  39. ^ Washington State Legislature (February 18, 1925). "Chapter 26". Session Laws of the State of Washington. Session Laws of the State of Washington (1925 ed.). Olympia, Washington: Washington State Legislature. p. 59. Retrieved March 2, 2013. A primary state highway, to be known as State Road No. 3, or the Inland Empire Highway, is established as follows: Also from a junction at Colfax to a junction with the eastern route of the Inland Empire Highway at Pullman. 
  40. ^ Washington State Legislature (March 11, 1915). "Chapter 53: Public Highways Appropriation". Session Laws of the State of Washington. Session Laws of the State of Washington (1915 ed.). Olympia, Washington: Washington State Legislature. p. 184. Retrieved March 2, 2013. There is hereby established a secondary highway, commencing at Spokane, Spokane county, Washington, thence northeasterly following the most feasible route through the town of Mead to Newport in Pend Oreille county, Washington, and there is hereby appropriated for survey and construction of said secondary highway. 
  41. ^ State of Washington Showing State Highways Authorized by Legislative Acts of 1915 (DJVU) (Map). Bureau of Statistics and Immigration of the State of Washington. 1915. Retrieved February 18, 2013. 
  42. ^ a b Washington State Legislature (March 19, 1923). "Chapter 185: Primary and Secondary State Highways". Session Laws of the State of Washington. Session Laws of the State of Washington (1923 ed.). Olympia, Washington: Washington State Legislature. pp. 627, 629. Retrieved March 2, 2013. A primary state highway, to be known as State Road No. 3, or the Inland Empire Highway, is established as follows: Beginning at the international boundary line at Laurier in Ferry County; thence by the most feasible route in a southerly direction through Colville, Spokane, Colfax, Dayton to Walla Walla; thence in a northwesterly direction through the cities of Wallula, Pasco, Sunnyside, Yakima, Ellensburg, to a junction with the Sunset Highway at or near Virden in Kittitas County. A primary state highway, to be known as State Road No. 6 or the Pend O'Reille Highway, is established as follows: Beginning at Spokane; thence by the most feasible route in a northeasterly direction to Newport in Pend O'Reille County; thence in a northerly direction through Metaline Falls to the international boundary line. 
  43. ^ Washington State Legislature (March 17, 1937). "Chapter 190: Establishment of Primary State Highways". Session Laws of the State of Washington. Session Laws of the State of Washington (1937 ed.). Olympia, Washington: Washington State Legislature. pp. 934–935, 937. Retrieved March 2, 2013. A primary state highway to be known as Primary State Highway No. 3, or the Inland Empire Highway, is hereby established according to description as follows: Beginning at a junction with Primary State Highway No. 2 in the vicinity east of Cle Elum, thence southeasterly by the most feasible route by way of Ellensburg, Yakima, Pasco and Wallula to Walla Walla, thence in a northerly direction by the most feasible route by way of Dayton, Dodge, Colfax, Rosalia, Spokane and Colville to the international boundary line in the vicinity of Laurier; also beginning at a junction with Primary State Highway No. 3, as herein described, in the vicinity of Dodge, thence in an easterly direction by the most feasible route by way of Pomeroy and Clarkston to the Washington-Idaho boundary line; also beginning at a junction with Primary State Highway No. 3, as herein described, in the vicinity south of Rosalia, thence in a southerly direction by the most feasible route by way of Pullman to a point of junction southeast of Uniontown, thence in an easterly direction by two most feasible routes to two points on the Washington-Idaho boundary line; also beginning at Colfax on Primary State Highway No. 3, as herein described, thence in a southeasterly direction by the most feasible route to Pullman on Primary State Highway No. 3, as herein described, thence in an easterly direction by the most feasible route to a point on the Washington-Idaho boundary line. A primary state highway to be known as Primary State Highway No. 6, or the Pend Oreille Highway, is hereby established according to description as follows: Beginning at a junction with Primary State Highway No. 3, in the vicinity north of Spokane, thence in a northerly direction by the most feasible route by way of Newport and Metaline Falls to the international boundary line; also beginning at Newport on Primary State Highway No. 6, as herein described, thence in an easterly direction to the Washington-Idaho boundary line. 
  44. ^ United States System of Highways (PDF) (Map). Bureau of Public Roads. November 11, 1926. OCLC 32889555. Retrieved March 2, 2013. 
  45. ^ "New Inland Empire Highway Realignment Progresses Rapidly". The Spokesman-Review. May 7, 1939. p. 47. Retrieved March 2, 2013. 
  46. ^ Weingroff, Richard (April 7, 2011). "U.S. 2: Houlton, Maine, to Everett, Washington". Federal Highway Administration. Retrieved March 2, 2013. 
  47. ^ Prahl, C. G. (December 1, 1965). "Identification of State Highways" (PDF). Washington State Highway Commission, Department of Highways. Retrieved March 2, 2013. 
  48. ^ "Freeway Dedication Slated in Spokane". Tri-County Tribune. September 18, 1969. p. 1. Retrieved March 2, 2013. 
  49. ^ "Minutes of the Idaho Board of Highway Directors and the Idaho Transportation Board" (PDF). Idaho Transportation Department. May 25, 1967. p. 64. Retrieved March 2, 2013. 
  50. ^ "Pullman bypass nearly complete". Lewiston Morning Tribune. November 19, 1974. p. 11. Retrieved February 25, 2013. 
  51. ^ "U.S. 195 Road Link Not Done". Spokane Daily Chronicle. September 24, 1975. p. 1. Retrieved March 2, 2013. 
  52. ^ "Rosalia bypass just about ready". Lewiston Morning Tribune. November 29, 1975. p. 6. Retrieved January 13, 2013. 
  53. ^ Barr, Robert A. (February 9, 1972). "Bay Freeway fund lost to area". The Seattle Times. p. B3. 
  54. ^ "Bay Freeway Defeat to Aid Spokane Area". Spokane Daily Chronicle. February 9, 1972. p. 1. Retrieved May 1, 2015 – via Google News Archive. 
  55. ^ a b Ammons, David (November 21, 1979). "State Patrol looking for bad apples". Lewiston Morning Tribune. p. 16. Retrieved March 2, 2013. 
  56. ^ "Scenic byway could run through Palouse". Lewiston Morning Tribune. December 21, 2002. p. 18. Retrieved March 30, 2013. 
  57. ^ "Resoultion No. 670" (PDF). Washington State Transportation Commission. March 2005. Retrieved March 30, 2013. 
  58. ^ Simonson, Chad. "US 195 - Hatch Road to Interstate 90". Washington State Department of Transportation. Retrieved March 2, 2013. 
  59. ^ Gilson, Al (February 27, 2013). "Construction on new US 195 interchange swings into action". Washington State Department of Transportation. Retrieved March 2, 2013. 
  60. ^ Google (July 18, 2008). "U.S. Route 195 Spur" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved July 18, 2008. 
  61. ^ "Milepoint Log - State Highway System" (PDF). Idaho Transportation Department. March 19, 2014. p. 283. Retrieved April 15, 2014. 

External links[edit]

Route map: Bing