UCLA Bruins women's volleyball

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UCLA Bruins Women's Volleyball
UCLA Bruins Women's Volleyball athletic logo

University UCLA
Conference Pac-12
Location Los Angeles, CA
Head Coach Michael Sealy (2nd year)
Arena Pauley Pavilion
(Capacity: 12,829)
Nickname Bruins
Colors True Blue and Gold

             

AIAW and NCAA Tournament Champions
1971-72, 1974, 1975,1984, 1990, 1991, 2011
AIAW and NCAA Tournament Runner Up
1976, 1978, 1981, 1983, 1992, 1994
AIAW and NCAA Tournament Final Four
1972-73, 1973, 1977, 1979, 1980, 1981, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1994, 2006, 2011
AIAW and NCAA Tournament Elite Eight
1999, 2000, 2001, 2003, 2004, 2007
AIAW and NCAA Tournament Appearances
1981, 1982, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2011
Conference Regular Season Champions
1986, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1992, 1993, 1999

UCLA's women's volleyball program began its first year in 1965. Andy Banachowski had been the head coach each year since 1965 until his retirement after the 2010 season, with the exception of 1968-69 when he graduated from UCLA. In that season, Mardi Hardy was the head coach. Michael Sealy took over as head coach in 2011 and led the team to a national championship in his first season.

Banachowski had more wins than any other NCAA Division I women's volleyball coach, with a record (since 1970, since no records were kept from 1965-1969) of 1,082-292. Banachowski had led UCLA to six national championships (3 NCAA-1984, 1990, 1991; 2 AIAW-1974, 1975; and 1 DGWS-1972). UCLA has made 27 of 28 NCAA tournaments and has made 11 NCAA Final Fours, which is tied with Nebraska as the second most Final Four appearances of all Division I programs.[1]

NCAA championships[edit]

1984[edit]

UCLA claimed the program's first national title after two previous runner-up finishes. In the deciding fifth game against Stanford, UCLA was down 12-4, but with heroics from Liz Masakayan, the Bruins continued to chip away at the lead before earning match point at 14-13. Masakayan had the final kill to give UCLA the 15-13 win.[2]

1990[edit]

UCLA won the NCAA title by defeating Pacific 15-9, 15-12, 15-7. UCLA was led by Natalie Williams and Marissa Hatchett who had 12 kills a piece. The Bruins finished the 1990 season 36-1.[3]

1991[edit]

Playing at Pauley Pavilion, the Bruins repeated as NCAA champions by defeating Long Beach State in five games. After losing the first two games by the scores of 15-12, 15-13, UCLA completed off a huge comeback to take the next three games, 15-12, 15-6, 15-11.[4]

UCLA's comebacks was one of the biggest in NCAA history, since this match, no team has ever rallied from 2 games to 0 to win in five games in the NCAA national championship. UCLA finished their season 31-5.

2011[edit]

After 20 years, the UCLA Bruins captured their fourth title in history by defeating Illinois 3-1 on December 17, 2011 at the Alamodome in San Antonio, Texas. The Bruins were seeded 9th in the NCAA championship tournament. Enrouting to the title game, they defeated 4 time defending champions Penn State and No. 1 seeded Texas to face No. 3 seeded Illinois. Rachael Kidder was named the most outstanding player of the tournament. Lauren Van Orden and Zoe Nightingale were also named to the all tournament team. Head coach Michael Sealy is now a champion both as a player and a head coach. The Women's Volleyball team is featured in the new Pac-12 Networks Promo for the 2012 season.[5]

Season-by-season results[edit]

UCLA vs. USC in volleyball, 2008

Note: No records were kept until the 1970-71 season.

All seasons are under Andy Banachowski.

  • Conference History[1]
    • 1974-1975: Southern California Women’s Intercollegiate Athletic Conference
    • 1976-1984: Western Collegiate Athletic Association
    • 1985: PacWest Conference
    • 1986-present: Pacific-12 Conference
Year Overall
Record
Conference
Record
Conference
Standing
Postseason
1970-71 23-1
1971-72 28-1 DGWS Champions
1972-73 23-9 AIAW 3rd Place
1973 26-8 AIAW 4th Place
1974 28-2 2-2 3rd AIAW Champions
1975 32-2 4-0 1st AIAW Champions
1976 29-8 6-2 2nd AIAW Runners-Up
1977 32-8 6-2 2nd AIAW 3rd Place
1978 33-5 7-1 1st AIAW Runners-Up
1979 27-12 9-3 2nd AIAW 3rd Place
1980 38-14 10-2 2nd AIAW 4th Place
1981 34-11 10-2 2nd NCAA Runners-Up
1982 28-14 6-8 5th NCAA Regional Final
1983 44-6 13-1 1st NCAA Runners-Up
1984 33-6 11-3 2nd NCAA Champions
1985 29-8 5-3 2nd NCAA Final Four
1986 31-10 17-1 1st NCAA First round
1987 28-10 13-5 2nd NCAA Regional Semifinal
1988 34-1 18-0 1st NCAA Final Four
1989 30-3 18-0 1st NCAA Final Four
1990 36-1 18-0 1st NCAA Champions
1991 31-5 16-2 2nd NCAA Champions
1992 33-1 18-0 1st NCAA Runners-Up
1993 30-2 17-1 1st NCAA Regional Final
1994 32-4 16-2 2nd NCAA Runners-Up
1995 23-9 12-6 2rd[clarification needed] NCAA Regional Final
1996 17-14 9-9 6th
1997 17-13 9-9 6th NCAA Second round
1998 16-12 13-5 3rd NCAA Second round
1999 28-4 17-1 1st NCAA Regional Final
2000 25-8 14-4 4th NCAA Regional Final
2001 21-9 12-6 4th NCAA Regional Final
2002 20-14 9-9 5th NCAA Second round
2003 24-9 12-6 3rd NCAA Regional Final
2004 21-11 11-7 4th NCAA Regional Final
2005 20-11 10-8 5th NCAA Regional Semifinal
2006 33-4 15-3 2nd NCAA Final Four
2007 23-11 9-9 5th NCAA Regional Final
2008 22-11 9-9 5th NCAA Regional Semifinal
2009 24-9 13-5 2nd NCAA Second round
2010 22-9 11-7 4th NCAA Second round
2011 30-6 17-5 2nd NCAA Champions
2012 22–7 14–6 NCAA Second Round
Total 1,158-314 445-147

Olympians[edit]

Former players who have gone to the Olympic Games to play or coach.[1]

  • Coaches
    • Jeanne (Beauprey) Reeves - 1996 (Assistant Coach)
    • Liz Masakayan - 2004 & 2008 (Coach of McPeak/Youngs beach volleyball team)

References[edit]

External links[edit]