UEFA Women's Championship

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UEFA Women's Championship
UEFA Women's Euro logo.png
Founded 1984
Region Europe (UEFA)
Number of teams 52 (Qualifiers)
12 (Finals)
Current champions  Germany (8th title)
Most successful team(s)  Germany (8 titles)
Website Official website
UEFA Women's Euro 2013

The UEFA European Women's Championship, also called the UEFA Women's Euro and unofficially the "European Cup", held every fourth year, is the main competition in women's association football between national teams of the UEFA Confederation. The competition is the women's equivalent of the UEFA European Championship.

The predecessor tournament to the UEFA Women's Championship began in the early 1980s, under the name UEFA European Competition for Representative Women's Teams. With increasing popularity of women's football, the competition was given European Championship status by UEFA around 1990. Only the 1991 and 1995 editions have been used as European qualifiers for a World Cup; starting in 1999, the group system used in men's qualifiers was also used for women's national teams.

Eight UEFA Women's Championships have taken place, preceded by 3 editions of the earlier European Competition for Representative Women's Teams. The most recent holding of the competition was the 2013 Women's Euro hosted by Sweden in July 2013.

Expansion[edit]

The tournament was initially played as a four team event. The 1997 edition was the first that was played with eight teams. The third expansion happened in 2009 when 12 teams participated. From 2017 onwards 16 teams will compete for the championship.[1]

Results[edit]

European Competition for Women's Football[edit]

Year Host Final Third Place Match Number of teams
Winner Score Runner-up 3rd Place Score 4th Place
1984
Details
Final held over two legs
Sweden
1–0
0–1
4–3 (ps)

England
 Denmark and  Italy 4
1987
Details
Norway Norway
Norway
2–1
Sweden

Italy
2–1
England
4
1989
Details
West Germany West Germany
West Germany
4–1
Norway

Sweden
2–1
(a.e.t.)

Italy
4

UEFA European Women's Championship[edit]

Year Host Final Third place match Number of teams
Winner Score Runner-up Third place Score Fourth place
1991
Details
Denmark Denmark
Germany
3–1
(a.e.t.)

Norway

Denmark
2–1
(a.e.t.)

Italy
4
1993
Details
Italy Italy
Norway
1–0
Italy

Denmark
3–1
Germany
4
Year Host Final Losing semi-finalists Number of teams
Winner Score Runner-up
1995
Details
Germany Germany
Germany
3–2
Sweden
 England and  Norway 4
1997
Details
Norway Norway &
Sweden Sweden

Germany
2–0
Italy
 Spain and  Sweden 8
2001
Details
Germany Germany
Germany
1–0
(gg)

Sweden
 Denmark and  Norway 8
2005
Details
England England
Germany
3–1
Norway
 Finland and  Sweden 8
2009
Details
Finland Finland
Germany
6–2
England
 Norway and  Netherlands 12
2013
Details
Sweden Sweden
Germany
1–0
Norway
 Denmark and  Sweden 12
2017
Details
 Netherlands 16

Teams reaching the top four[edit]

Team Titles Runners-up Third-place Semi-finalists Fourth-place
 Germany 8 (1989, 1991, 1995, 1997, 2001, 2005, 2009, 2013) 1 (1993)
 Norway 2 (1987, 1993) 4 (1989, 1991, 2005, 2013) 3 (1995, 2001, 2009)
 Sweden 1 (1984) 3 (1987, 1995, 2001) 1 (1989) 3 (1997, 2005, 2013)
 Italy 2 (1993, 1997) 1 (1987) 1 (1984) 2 (1989, 1991)
 England 2 (1984, 2009) 1 (1995) 1 (1987)
 Denmark 2 (1991, 1993) 3 (1984, 2001, 2013)
 Spain 1 (1997)
 Finland 1 (2005)
 Netherlands 1 (2009)

Team summary[edit]

Participation details[edit]

Ceremony before the UEFA Women's Euro 2009 final (Germany vs. England) at the Helsinki Olympic Stadium in Helsinki, Finland
Players fighting for the ball during the match between Germany and Norway in UEFA Euro 2009 Women's European Championship in Tampere, Finland.
Reception of Germany women's national football team, after winning the 2009 UEFA Women's Championship, on the balcony of Frankfurt's city hall "Römer"
  • Participation by year of debut
    • 1984: Denmark, England, Italy, Sweden
    • 1987: Norway
    • 1989: Germany
    • 1997: France, Russia, Spain
    • 2005: Finland
    • 2009: Iceland, Netherlands, Ukraine
Legend
  • 1st – Champions
  • 2nd – Runners-up
  • 3rd – Third place (not determined after 1993)
  • 4th – Fourth place (not determined after 1993)
  • SF – Semifinals (since 1995)
  • QF – Quarterfinals (since 2009)
  • GS – Group stage
  • Q — Qualified for upcoming tournament
  •  •  — Did not qualify
  •  ×  — Did not enter
  •    — Hosts

For each tournament, the number of teams in each finals tournament (in brackets) are shown.

Team 1984
(4)
1987
Norway
(4)
1989
West Germany
(4)
1991
Denmark
(4)
1993
Italy
(4)
1995
Germany
(4)
1997
Norway
Sweden
(8)
2001
Germany
(8)
2005
England
(8)
2009
Finland
(12)
2013
Sweden
(12)
2017
Netherlands
(16)
Years
 Denmark 3rd 3rd 3rd GS SF GS GS SF 8
 England 2nd 4th SF GS GS 2nd GS 7
 Finland SF QF GS 3
 France GS GS GS QF QF 5
 Germany 1st 1st 4th 1st 1st 1st 1st 1st 1st 9
 Iceland × × × GS QF 2
 Italy 4th 3rd 4th 4th 2nd 2nd GS GS QF QF 10
 Netherlands SF GS 2
 Norway 1st 2nd 2nd 1st SF GS SF 2nd SF 2nd 10
 Russia × × × × GS GS GS GS 4
 Spain × SF QF 2
 Sweden 1st 2nd 3rd 2nd SF 2nd SF QF SF 9
 Ukraine Part of  Soviet Union × GS 1

Tournament statistics[edit]

Highest attendances[edit]

Top scorers by tournament[edit]

Year Player Maximum
matches
Goals
1984 Sweden Pia Sundhage 4 4
1987 Norway Trude Strendal 2 3
1989 Norway Sissel Grude
Germany Ursula Lohn
2 2
1991 Germany Heidi Mohr 2 4
1993 Denmark Susan Mackensie 2 2
1995 Sweden Lena Videkull 3 3
1997 Italy Carolina Morace
Norway Marianne Pettersen
France Angélique Rouhas
5 4
2001 Germany Claudia Müller
Germany Sandra Smisek
5 3
2005 Germany Inka Grings 5 4
2009 Germany Inka Grings 6 6
2013 Sweden Lotta Schelin 6 5

Age-related records[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Women's EURO and U17s expanded". UEFA. 8 December 2011. Retrieved 8 December 2011. 

External links[edit]