UK Asian Music Awards

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UK Asian Music Awards
UK AMA logo.jpg
UK Asian Music Awards logo
Awarded for Asian music
Country United Kingdom
Presented by B4U Music
First awarded 2002
Official website www.theukama.com

The UK Asian Music Awards, also known by the abbreviation UK AMA, is an awards show that is held annually in the United Kingdom since 2002. The awards show has been produced and broadcast by B4U Music since 2008.[1] Awards winners are decided by public voting at a website, from a list of nominees presented by the event organizers, except for the special category awards "Outstanding Achievement" and "Commitment to Scene" which are decided by the organizers.[2] Desimag called the event "The most prestigious Asian music awards ceremony in the UK".[3]

History[edit]

The UK Asian Music Awards were founded by Abs Shaid in 2002 as "The Asian DJ and Music Awards". They were held on March 6, 2002 at the Aquarium nightclub in London. The event was filmed by BBC2 and Zee TV, and was aired on BBC2s Network East.[4]

Following the success of the 2002 event, the UK Asian Music Awards (UKAMA) was formed. In 2003, Abs Shaid teamed with Br-Asian Media, managed by managing director Moiz Vas, to produce the 2003 event.[5] The event took place in London at Hammersmith Palais on the 22 October 2003. It was filmed and broadcast by ITV, who reported viewing figures of one million in the UK. B4U Music broadcast two exclusive versions during prime time slots in 80 countries over the Christmas period.[6] Other sources give the viewing figures of 2 millions in the UK and 500 million worldwide.[4] A 2003 review by Tom Horan in The Telegraph said: "This was a hugely inspiring night for new British music... The freshest most innovative and exciting sounds this year have come from the Asian club world. Here, with the first ever AMAs, the scene celebrated its gate crashing of the pop mainstream... there was something in the event's familial warmth and celebration that spoke of a thousand wedding receptions".[6] Award winners were decided via online, SMS and interactive television voting.[6] The voting process was criticized, claiming that the event turned out to be a popularity contest.[7]

After the show, both parties claimed rights to continuing the show. This resulted in both parties issuing their own announcements for the next event, with Shaid's group keeping the name "UK Asian Music Awards" and Br-Asian's group calling it the British Asian Music Awards (BrAMA).[5] ITV chose to side with BrAMA.[8] and on 7 October 2004 Br-Asian made a launch party, planning the for 23 February 2005 at Ocean in London,[9] which was later changed to 24 March 2005.[10]

The 2005 UKAMA was held on 3 March 2005 at Hammersmith Palais, London, in front of a packed audience.[11] To avoid some of the voting controversy, most awards were decided by a judges panel, out of a short list which was created by public voting. The winners of the Best Asian Radio, Best Asian Publication and Best Asian Website were determined by online and SMS voting.[12]

The 2005 BrAMA were supposed to be held on 24 March 2005 at Cirque, in London. The event was supposed to be broadcast on Channel 4 on 27 March 2005 and shown on B4U Music a week later.[13] However, to avoid confusion with the UKAMA, the event was postponed on 11 March 2005, and tickets were reimbursed.[10] The event never took place, and finally, Br-Asian bowed out.[14]

The 2006 event was held on 6 December 2006 at Hammersmith Palais, London, and was sponsored by Ary Digital.[15] Two new categories were introduced, "Best Female Act" and "Best Unsigned Talent".[15] Nominations were announced on November 2006.[16]

2008 marked the big year for the UK Asian Music Awards, as they moved from the Hammersmith Palais to the Royal Festival Hall and were first presented by B4U Music.[17] Royal Festival Hall for three years (2008 / 2009 / 2010) and moved to the Roundhouse, Camden in March 2011. It has previously been broadcast on ITV, B4U Music and most recently on the BBC red button (2010 and 2011). The UK AMAs celebrated its 10th year anniversary on 25 October at Wimbley Arena, with a show headlined by international music star Ustad Rahat Fateh Ali Khan and was attended by music producer naughty boy.

Award winners[edit]

2003[edit]

The 2003 event was held on the 22 October 2003 at Hammersmith Palais, London. Award winners were:[9]

2005[edit]

The 2005 event was held on 3 March 2005 at Hammersmith Palais, London. The award winners were:[18]

2006[edit]

The 2006 event was held on 6 December 2006 at Hammersmith Palais, London. The award winners were:[19]

2008[edit]

The 2008 event was the first to be presented by B4U Music.[17] Nominees were announced on January 2008,[21] and the event was held on 6 March 2008 at the Royal Festival Hall, London. The award winners were:[22]

2009[edit]

Nominees for the 2009 event were announced on January 2009.[23] The 2009 event was held on March 5, 2009 at the Royal Festival Hall, London. The award winners were:[24]

2010[edit]

Nominees for the 2010 event were announced on 2 February 2010 at the Gatecrasher Nightclub, Birmingham.[2] The event was held on March 11 at the Royal Festival Hall, London, and was sponsored by Lebara Mobile. The award winners were:[25]

2011[edit]

The press & media launch party for the 2011 event was held on 25 November 2010 at Club Alto, London.[26] The nomination party took place on 1 February 2011 at the Gatecrasher Nightclub, Birmingham.[27] The event was held on 10 March 2011 at The Roundhouse, London and was sponsored by Lebara Mobile. The award winners were:[28]

2012[edit]

The events of the 10th anniversary edition of the award, in 2012, were launched on 6 December 2011 in a voting launch party at the Merah club in London.[29] The event was hosted by Sarah-Jane Crawford and Tommy Sandhu and included performance by Mumzy Stranger, among other. The 2012 event took place at Wembley Arena and was headlined by a special performance by Rahat Fateh Ali Khan.[30]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "B4Utv.com -UKAMA - UK Asian Music Awards". b4utv.com. Retrieved 24 August 2010. 
  2. ^ a b Jas Sembhi (February 3, 2010). "2010 UK Asian Music Awards Nominees". desiblitz.com. Retrieved 24 August 2010. 
  3. ^ "DesiMag - The Lebara Mobile UK Asian Music Awards 2010". desimag.co.uk. 26 October 2009. Retrieved 24 August 2010. 
  4. ^ a b "The UK Asian Music Awards Launch Party". myspace.com. Retrieved 24 August 2010. 
  5. ^ a b "Rivalry breaks out over the Asian Music Awards". asiansinmedia.org. 10 June 2004. Retrieved 24 August 2010. 
  6. ^ a b c "London to host British Asian Music Awards - Hindustan Times". hindustantimes.com. 2004-10-13. Retrieved 24 August 2010. 
  7. ^ Sunny Hundal (27 October 2003). "British Asian Music Awards: glitzy but flawed". asiansinmedia.org. Retrieved 24 August 2010. 
  8. ^ "ITV supports Brasian over Asian Music Awards controversy". asiansinmedia.org. Retrieved 24 August 2010. 
  9. ^ a b "BRITISH ASIAN MUSIC AWARDS 2004 LAUNCHED". 7 October 2004. Retrieved 24 August 2010. 
  10. ^ a b "British Asian Music Awards postponed for 'clarity'". asiansinmedia.org. 11 March 2005. Retrieved 24 August 2010. 
  11. ^ "UK AMA ceremony takes place in front of packed audience". asiansinmedia.org. 4 March 2005. Retrieved 24 August 2010. 
  12. ^ "UK ASIAN MUSIC AWARDS 2005 - PUBLIC VOTING CLOSES". 13 February 2005. Retrieved 24 August 2010. 
  13. ^ "Channel 4 grabs TV rights for British Asian Music Awards". asiansinmedia.org. 21 February 2005. Retrieved 24 August 2010. 
  14. ^ "UK Asian Music Awards this week". asiansinmedia.org. March 3, 2008. Retrieved 24 August 2010. 
  15. ^ a b "Top Performances Announced for Asian Music Awards 2006" (Press release). UK Asian Music Awards. 23 November 2006. 
  16. ^ "UK AMAs 2006 nominations announced". media247.co.uk. November 18, 2006. Retrieved 24 August 2010. 
  17. ^ a b "B4U ties up with UK Asian Music awards :: Businessofcinema.com". businessofcinema.com. 28 February 2008. Retrieved 24 August 2010. 
  18. ^ "Artists unite to celebrate British Asian Music". Retrieved 24 August 2010. 
  19. ^ "Desi hits the UK AMA's - London 2006 - on desihits.com". desihits.com. January 1, 2007. Retrieved 24 August 2010. 
  20. ^ "Timeline: The rise and fall of Club Asia". media247.co.uk. August 13, 2009. Retrieved 24 August 2010. 
  21. ^ "UK Asian Music Awards nominees announced - The Asian News". menmedia.co.uk. January 18, 2008. Retrieved 24 August 2010. 
  22. ^ Nazhat (March 8, 2008). "The UK Asian Music Awards 2008". desiblitz.com. Retrieved 24 August 2010. 
  23. ^ Jas Sembhi (January 20, 2009). "UK Asian Music Awards Nominees". desiblitz.com. Retrieved 24 August 2010. 
  24. ^ "2009 UK AMA Award Winners - on desihits.com". desihits.com. March 6, 2009. Retrieved 24 August 2010. 
  25. ^ "BBC - Asian Network - BBC Asian Network AMA 2010 - Winners". bbc.co.uk. Retrieved 24 August 2010. 
  26. ^ "The Lebara Mobile UK Asian Music Awards 2011... Nominations Party in Birmingham!". ethnicnow.com. Retrieved 1 February 2011. 
  27. ^ "The Lebara Mobile UK Asian Music Awards 2011... and the nominees are...". ethnicnow.com. 2 February 2011. Retrieved 13 March 2011. 
  28. ^ Jas Sembhi (March 10, 2011). "2011 UK Asian Music Awards Winners". desiblitz.com. Retrieved 13 March 2011. 
  29. ^ "Lebara Mobile UK Asian Music Awards 2012 Voting Launch Party". anokhimagazine.com. Retrieved 30 December 2011. 
  30. ^ "Press Release: The Lebara Mobile UK Asian Music Awards 2012 Move to Wembley Arena". theukama.com. Retrieved 30 December 2011. 

External links[edit]