UK Astronomy Technology Centre

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UK Astronomy Technology Centre
Stfc-ukatc-logo.gif
UK ATC logo
Abbreviation UK ATC
Formation 1998
Legal status Research council establishment
Purpose Technology development for astronomy
Location
Coordinates 55°55′23″N 3°11′16″W / 55.92306°N 3.18778°W / 55.92306; -3.18778Coordinates: 55°55′23″N 3°11′16″W / 55.92306°N 3.18778°W / 55.92306; -3.18778
Region served United Kingdom and beyond
Parent organization Science and Technology Facilities Council
Website UK ATC

The UK Astronomy Technology Centre (UK ATC) is based at the Royal Observatory in Edinburgh, Scotland, and is part of the Science and Technology Facilities Council.

The UK ATC designs, builds, develops, tests and manages major instrumentation projects in support of UK and international Astronomy. It has design offices, workshops and test facilities for both ground- and space-based instruments, including a suite of test labs capable of handling the largest current and projected instruments.[1][2]

The UK ATC was formed in 1998 in Edinburgh from the technology departments of the Royal Observatory, Edinburgh (ROE), and the Royal Greenwich Observatory, Cambridge (RGO). Its initial "customers" were the then new Gemini Observatory, the former ROE observatories in Hawaii (the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) and the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope (UKIRT)), and a former RGO observatory, the Isaac Newton Group on La Palma, Canary Islands.[3] More recently, collaboration with the European Southern Observatory (ESO) and for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) have gained importance.[1] Major projects and collaborations include:

"Flexure rig" to simulate operational movement on a telescope.
Lab with clean room.

Following increased government emphasis on knowledge transfer and declining funds for the Science and Technology Facilities Council[18] the UK ATC is increasingly working on projects with astronomical institutions beyond the UK and the EU, with institutions dedicated to science and technology other than astronomy, and with technology-related businesses.[19]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b UK Astronomy Technology Centre. UK ATC information sheet. Retrieved 5 January 2011.
  2. ^ Facilities and expertise. UK ATC information sheet. Retrieved 5 January 2011.
  3. ^ a b UK ATC history. UK ATC. Retrieved 1 April 2012.
  4. ^ GCAL The Gemini Facility Calibration Unit. UK ATC. Retrieved 5 January 2011.
  5. ^ GMOS. UK ATC. Retrieved 5 January 2011.
  6. ^ GPol. UK ATC. Retrieved 5 January 2011.
  7. ^ Michelle. UK ATC. Retrieved 5 January 2011.
  8. ^ ORAC. UK ATC. Retrieved 5 January 2011.
  9. ^ WFCAM. UK ATC. Retrieved 5 January 2011.
  10. ^ SPIRE. UK ATC. Retrieved 5 January 2011.
  11. ^ VISTA. UK ATC. Retrieved 5 January 2011.
  12. ^ SCUBA 2. UK ATC. Retrieved 5 January 2011.
  13. ^ MIRI. UK ATC. Retrieved 5 January 2011.
  14. ^ ALMA – The Atacama Large Millimetre Array. UK ATC. Retrieved 5 January 2011.
  15. ^ The UK role in the European Extremely Large Telescope. UK ATC. Retrieved 5 January 2011.
  16. ^ KMOS. UK ATC. Retrieved 5 January 2011.
  17. ^ OPTICON. UK ATC. Retrieved 5 January 2011.
  18. ^ Paul Crowther (2007-2011). STFC Funding Crisis: Astronomy. Retrieved 5 January 2011.
  19. ^ ATC Innovations – what we offer. UK ATC. Retrieved 5 January 2011.

External links[edit]