USC&GS Guide (1929)

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For other ships of the same name, see USC&GS Guide.
USS Andradite (PYc-11).jpg
The former USC&GS Guide as the U.S. Navy patrol vessel USS Andradite (PYc-11) sometime between 1942 and 1945.
Career (United States) Flag of the United States Coast and Geodetic Survey.svg
Name: Guide
Namesake: Guide, a person who leads anyone through unknown or unmapped country
Builder: Defoe Boat and Motor Works, Bay City, Michigan
Completed: 1929
Acquired: 1941
Fate: Transferred to U.S. Navy 16 March 1942
Notes: Served as civilian yacht Cameco[1] or Comoco[2] and Caronia[3] or Coronia[4] 1929-1941
Served as U.S. Navy patrol vessel USS Andradite (PYc-11) 1942-1945
In commercial service 1952-1956
Destroyed by fire 1956
General characteristics
Type: Survey ship
Displacement: 225 to 395 tons
Length: 140.2 ft (42.7 m)
Beam: 23.6 ft (7.2 m)
Draft: 9.4 ft (2.9 m)
Installed power: 1,200 shaft horsepower (1.6 megawatts)
Propulsion: Two 600-horsepower (0.8-megawatt) Cooper Bessemer 8-G X-6M R diesel engines; two shafts
Speed: 11.7 knots

The second USC&GS Guide was a survey ship that served in the United States Coast and Geodetic Survey from 1941 to 1942.

Guide was built as the civilian yacht Cameco[5] or Comoco[6] by the Defoe Boat and Motor Works at Bay City, Michigan, in 1929. She later was renamed Caronia[7] or Coronia.[8] The United States Navy acquired her in 1941 and transferred her to the Coast and Geodetic Survey, which named her USC&GS Guide.

After conversion for service as a survey ship, Guide entered Coast and Geodetic Survey service in 1941. She did a small amount of hydrographic surveying work in San Francisco Bay, California, before her Coast and Geodetic Survey career was cut short when she was transferred to the U.S. Navy on 16 March 1942 for World War II service under Executive Order 9072 of 24 February 1942.[9]

In the Navy, the ship served as the patrol vessel USS Andradite (PYc-11) until 1945. Sources differ on whether she returned to Coast and Geodetic Survey service in 1947,[10] but she was sold into commercial service in 1952 and operated until destroyed by fire in the Pacific Ocean in 1956.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Per the Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships (at http://www.history.navy.mil/danfs/a8/andradite.htm).
  2. ^ Per NavSource Online (at http://www.navsource.org/archives/12/1411.htm) and the NOAA History Web site (at http://www.history.noaa.gov/ships/ship9.html#guide2).
  3. ^ Per NavSource Online (at http://www.navsource.org/archives/12/1411.htm).
  4. ^ Per the NOAA History Web site (at http://www.history.noaa.gov/ships/ship9.html#guide2).
  5. ^ Per the Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships (at http://www.history.navy.mil/danfs/a8/andradite.htm).
  6. ^ Per NavSource Online (at http://www.navsource.org/archives/12/1411.htm).
  7. ^ Per NavSource Online (at http://www.navsource.org/archives/12/1411.htm).
  8. ^ Per the NOAA History Web site (at http://www.history.noaa.gov/ships/ship9.html#guide2).
  9. ^ http://www.archives.gov/federal-register/executive-orders/1942.html#9072 | Executive Order 9072 - Transfer of the Pioneer (ex Argus), Guide (ex Andradite) and Pratt (ex YP-96) and certain personnel from the Coast and Geodetic Survey to the War and Navy Departments
  10. ^ NavSource Online' asserts (at http://www.navsource.org/archives/12/1411.htm) that she served in the "United States Coast and Geodetic Service" as Caronia beginning in 1947, but the NOAA History Web site (at http://www.history.noaa.gov/ships/cgs_ships.html) has no record of a Caronia or similarly named vessel ever serving in the Coast and Geodetic Survey.

References[edit]