USC Sol Price School of Public Policy

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USC Sol Price School of Public Policy
Established 1929
Type Private
Dean Jack H. Knott
Academic staff 169
Students 1095
Location Los Angeles & Sacramento, California, USA
Campus Urban
Website www.usc.edu/schools/sppd

The USC Sol Price School of Public Policy[1] (USC Price), previously known as School of Policy, Planning, and Development (SPPD), at the University of Southern California is a leading urban planning, public policy, public administration, real estate development and health policy and management school in the United States.[2] USC Price offers undergraduate and graduate programs, including a doctoral program and several professional and executive master's degree programs.[3] USC Price also offers the Master of Public Administration program at a campus in Sacramento.[4]


History[edit]

Urban planning classes were first delivered at USC in 1921 by Gordon Whitnall, who was instrumental in founding the Planning Commission of the City of Los Angeles. In 1929, the USC School of Citizenship and Public Administration opened its doors, becoming one of only two programs of its kind in the nation. The school did not resemble very much the larger complex school it is today, but it contained the seeds of what is currently the modern USC Price.

In addition to offering a degree in public administration, the School of Citizenship and Public Administration included classes in urban and regional planning from the outset, which eventually led to the urban and regional planning degree and school at USC. Over time, the School of Public Administration formed the health administration program and the public policy program.[5]

In 1955, the School of Public Administration and the School of Architecture and Fine Arts instituted a graduate program in city and regional planning. The graduate planning program grew into an independent academic unit in the 1960s. In 1971, the Irvine Foundation gave its first USC grant to establish an endowed chair in urban and regional planning. In 1974, the USC Board of Trustees merged the Graduate Program in Urban and Regional Planning with the Center for Urban Studies to create the School of Planning and Urban Studies, subsequently the School of Urban and Regional Planning, the first planning program in the nation to achieve status as an independent school. The Irvine foundation provided the new school with an additional endowment for the support of graduate students.[6] The school's undergraduate program was offered jointly with the School of Public Administration.

The School of Urban and Regional Planning formed a graduate program in real estate development in 1985, and founded the Lusk Center for Real Estate Development in 1988 with a generous gift from John Lusk and his family. The school also launched a new undergraduate program to compliment its existing program with the School of Public Administration. A gift from Ralph Lewis and his wife Goldy, the co-founders of Lewis Homes,[7] enabled the School to break ground for a new building on May 24, 1995, USC's Ralph and Goldy Lewis Hall.[8] The School was renamed the School of Urban Planning and Development in 1996; and in 1998, the USC Board of Trustees merged the School of Urban Planning and Development with the School of Public Administration to form the School of Policy, Planning, and Development. The Lusk Center for Real Estate Development was reorganized into Lusk Center for Real Estate, a university-level research unit jointly administered by USC Price and the USC Marshall School of Business.[9][10]

In November 2011, the Price Family Charitable Fund gave a $50 million naming gift to honor the life and legacy of USC alumnus Sol Price, founder of Price Club.[11] The school was renamed the USC Sol Price School of Public Policy with the shortened name of USC Price.[1]

Rankings[edit]

For 2011, USC Price is currently ranked #1 in the United States among "The 10 Best Graduate Programs" for Urban Planning, according to TheBestColleges.org.[12]

USC Price is ranked #6 in the United States among "America's Best Graduate Schools" for Public Affairs, according to U.S. News & World Report.[2]

USC Price is also ranked #7 for its graduate Urban Planning program by Planetizen's "The Top Schools For Urban Planners" (2012 Guide - Top 10 Planning Programs) in 2011.[13]

U.S. News & World Report also ranks USC Price as:

  • #4 in city management and urban policy[14]
  • #5 in public management and administration[15]
  • #7 in nonprofit management[16]
  • #9 in health policy and management[17]
  • #10 in social policy[18]

Programs of Study[edit]

USC Price currently offers:

Research Centers[edit]

  • Judith and John Bedrosian Center on Governance and the Public Enterprise
  • Center for Economic Development
  • Center for Health Financing, Policy and Management
  • Center for Sustainable Cities
  • Center on Philanthropy and Public Policy
  • Center for the Study of Immigrant Integration
  • Civic Engagement Initiative
  • Center for Risk and Economic Analysis of Terrorism Events (CREATE)
  • Keston Institute for Public Finance and Infrastructure Policy
  • Lusk Center for Real Estate
  • METRANS Transportation Center
  • Population Dynamics Group
  • Schaeffer Center for Health Policy and Economics
  • Schwarzenegger Institute for State and Global Policy
  • Tomás Rivera Policy Institute

Notable alumni[edit]

Notable faculty[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Jack H. Knott, Announcing a Naming Gift for Our Great School, USC Sol Price School of Public Policy, November 29, 2011.
  2. ^ a b "America's Best Graduate Schools 2011 Edition: Rankings - Public Affairs". U.S. News & World Report. May 2010. 
  3. ^ About SPPD
  4. ^ SPPD in Sacramento
  5. ^ SPPD Facts
  6. ^ School of Urban and Regional Planning, "About the School of Urban and Regional Planning and its 20th Anniversary as the Nation's First Such Autonomous Unit," L.A. Platina, University of Southern California, 1994.
  7. ^ D. Schenck (March 23, 2006) "Lewis Homes Co-Founder Dies at 84," USC News.
  8. ^ USC News Service (June 5, 1995) "Cementing Urban Ties," University of Southern California Chronicle, 14(32):2
  9. ^ M. Sullivan (August 31, 1998) "Public Administration, Urban Planning Combine Forces," USC News.
  10. ^ M. Sullivan (Winter, 1998) "There's a New School in Town," Trojan Family Magazine.
  11. ^ Gordon, Larry (November 29, 2011). "USC School of Public Policy gets $50-million gift". LA Times. Retrieved 1 December 2011. 
  12. ^ "The 10 Best Graduate Programs In Urban And Regional Planning". TheBestColleges.org. 
  13. ^ "Planetizen". Planetizen. 
  14. ^ "America's Best Graduate Schools 2011 Edition: Rankings - Public Affairs - City Management & Urban Policy". U.S. News & World Report. May 2010. 
  15. ^ "America's Best Graduate Schools 2011 Edition: Rankings - Public Affairs - Public Management & Administration". U.S. News & World Report. May 2010. 
  16. ^ "America's Best Graduate Schools 2011 Edition: Rankings - Public Affairs - Nonprofit Management". U.S. News & World Report. May 2010. 
  17. ^ "America's Best Graduate Schools 2011 Edition: Rankings - Public Affairs - Health Policy & Management". U.S. News & World Report. May 2010. 
  18. ^ "America's Best Graduate Schools 2011 Edition: Rankings - Public Affairs - Social Policy". U.S. News & World Report. May 2010. 
  19. ^ Bebitch Jeffe, Sherry (2012-11-14). "Carmen Warschaw Remembered as California Political "Powerhouse"". KNBC. Retrieved 2012-12-03. 

External links[edit]