USS Badger (DD-126)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
For other ships of the same name, see USS Badger.
USS Badger (DD-126)
Career (US)
Namesake: Oscar C. Badger
Builder: New York Shipbuilding Corporation, Camden, New Jersey
Laid down: 9 January 1918
Launched: 24 August 1918
Commissioned: 29 May 1919 to May 1922
January 1930 to 20 July 1945
Struck: 13 August 1945
Fate: Sold for scrapping, 30 November 1945
General characteristics
Class & type: Wickes-class destroyer
Displacement: 1,211 tons
Length: 314 ft 5 in (95.83 m)
Beam: 31 ft 8 in (9.65 m)
Draft: 9 ft 4 in (2.84 m)
Speed: 35 knots (65 km/h)
Complement: 136 officers and enlisted
Armament: 4 × 4 in (102 mm), 2 × 3 in (76 mm), 12 × 21 in (533 mm) torpedo tubes

USS Badger (DD–126) was a Wickes-class destroyer in the United States Navy during World War I. She was named for Commodore Oscar C. Badger.

Badger was launched 24 August 1918 by New York Shipbuilding Corporation, Camden, New Jersey; sponsored by Mrs. Henry F. Bryan, granddaughter of Commodore Badger; commissioned 29 May 1919, Commander Q. T. Swasey in command; and reported to the Atlantic Fleet.

Service history[edit]

Following commissioning, Badger steamed to the Mediterranean where she cruised until August 1919. Upon her return to the east coast, she was assigned to the Pacific Fleet, arriving at San Diego in September. She served at various naval bases on the west coast until May 1922, when she was placed out of commission.

Upon recommissioning in January 1930, Badger served with the Battle Force and Scouting Force in the Pacific. In April 1933, she returned to the Atlantic and thereafter participated in coastal cruises and reserve training. During 1938 to 1939, she operated with Special Squadron 4 based at Villefranche, France. Upon her return to Norfolk, she joined Destroyer Division 53, Patrol Force with additional summer assignments to the Midshipmen Coastal Cruise Detachment.

World War II[edit]

Between December 1941 and October 1944, Badger operated as a convoy escort in the Atlantic and Caribbean. Twice she escorted convoys to North Africa (15 October – 28 November 1943 and 15 February – 24 March 1944), and for a brief period (27 June – 1 September 1943) she served as a unit of anti-submarine hunter killer groups 21.12 and 21.16.

In October 1944, Badger transited the Panama Canal and conducted anti submarine training off Balboa, Canal Zone. Between 15 November 1944 and 20 June 1945, Badger served with the Anti-Submarine Development Detachment, Port Everglades, Florida, conducting anti-submarine development exercises. She arrived at Philadelphia 22 June 1945 and was decommissioned 20 July. She was sold 30 November 1945.

Awards[edit]

Badger received one battle star while operating with TG 21.12.

Convoys escorted[edit]

Convoy Escort Group Dates Notes
ON 26 20-29 Oct 1941[1] 33 ships escorted without loss from Iceland to Newfoundland prior to US declaration of war
HX 159 10-19 Nov 1941[2] 32 ships escorted without loss from Newfoundland to Iceland prior to US declaration of war
ON 39 29 Nov-4 Dec 1941[1] 35 ships escorted without loss from Iceland to Newfoundland prior to US declaration of war
HX 166 21-31 Dec 1941[2] 33 ships escorted without loss from Newfoundland to Iceland
ON 53 9-19 Jan 1942[1] 26 ships escorted without loss from Iceland to Newfoundland
HX 174 9-17 Feb 1942[2] 27 ships escorted without loss from Newfoundland to Iceland
SC 71 5 March 1942[3] Iceland shuttle
SC 77 11–14 April 1942[3] Iceland shuttle
SC 79 21 April 1942[3] Iceland shuttle
ON 91 1–5 May 1942[1] Iceland shuttle
SC 81 5 May 1942[3] Iceland shuttle
SC 83 17 May 1942[3] Iceland shuttle
SC 85 7 June 1942[3] Iceland shuttle
HX 194 22 June 1942[2] Iceland shuttle
SC 89 29 June 1942[3] Iceland shuttle
ON 112 14–17 July 1942[1] Iceland shuttle
SC 91 19 July 1942[3] Iceland shuttle
HX 212 MOEF group A3 23 Oct-1 Nov 1942[2] from Newfoundland to Northern Ireland; 5 ships torpedoed & sunk
ON 145 MOEF group A3 10-18 Nov 1942[1] from Northern Ireland to Iceland; 3 ships torpedoed (1 sank)
ON 144 19-22 Nov 1942[1] Iceland shuttle
SC 111 MOEF group A3 2-16 Dec 1942[3] 20 ships escorted without loss from Newfoundland to Northern Ireland
ON 156 MOEF group A3 24 Dec 1942-8 Jan 1943[1] 19 ships escorted without loss from Northern Ireland to Newfoundland
UGS 11 14–19 July 1943[4] 59 ships escorted without loss from Chesapeake Bay to Mediterranean Sea
UGS 15 Support Group with USS Core 27 August-2 September 1943[4] 50 ships escorted without loss from Chesapeake Bay to Mediterranean Sea
UGS 21 Support Group with USS Block Island 15–18 October 1943[4] 67 ships escorted without loss from Chesapeake Bay to Mediterranean Sea
GUS 20 Support Group with USS Block Island 13–14 November 1943[5] 78 ships escorted without loss from Mediterranean Sea to Chesapeake Bay
UGS 23 Support Group with USS Block Island 14–19 November 1943[4] 51 ships escorted without loss from Chesapeake Bay to Mediterranean Sea
GUS 32 7–23 March 1944[5] 91 ships escorted without loss from Mediterranean Sea to Chesapeake Bay

Source[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h "ON convoys". Andrew Hague Convoy Database. Retrieved 2011-06-19. 
  2. ^ a b c d e "HX convoys". Andrew Hague Convoy Database. Retrieved 2011-06-19. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i "SC convoys". Andrew Hague Convoy Database. Retrieved 2011-06-19. 
  4. ^ a b c d "UC convoys". Andrew Hague Convoy Database. Retrieved 2011-06-20. 
  5. ^ a b "UC convoys". Andrew Hague Convoy Database. Retrieved 2011-06-20. 

External links[edit]