USS Cincinnati (SSN-693)

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USS Cincinnati (SSN-693)
Career
Name: USS Cincinnati
Awarded: 4 February 1971
Builder: Newport News Shipbuilding
Laid down: 6 April 1974
Launched: 19 February 1977
Commissioned: 11 March 1978
Decommissioned: 29 July 1996
Struck: 29 July 1996
Fate: To be disposed of by submarine recycling
General characteristics
Class & type: Los Angeles class submarine
Displacement: 5,767 tons light
6,151 tons full
384 tons dead
Length: 110.3 m (361 ft 11 in)
Beam: 10 m (32 ft 10 in)
Draft: 9.4 m (30 ft 10 in)
Propulsion: S6G nuclear reactor, 2 turbines, 35,000 hp (26 MW), 1 auxiliary motor 325 hp (242 kW), 1 shaft
Speed: 15 knots (28 km/h) surfaced
32 knots (59 km/h) submerged
Test depth: 290 m (950 ft)
Complement: 12 Officers; 98 Enlisted
Armament: 4 × 21 in (533 mm) bow tubes
For other ships of the same name, see USS Cincinnati.

USS Cincinnati (SSN-693), a Los Angeles-class submarine, was the fourth ship of the United States Navy to be named for Cincinnati, Ohio. The contract to build her was awarded to Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company in Newport News, Virginia on 4 February 1971 and her keel was laid down on 6 April 1974. She was launched on 19 February 1977 sponsored by Mrs. William Keating, and commissioned on 10 June 1978, with Commander Gilbert V. Wilkes, III in command.

In August 1979, Cincinnati rescued a Finnish sailor 70 miles (100 km) off the east coast of Florida who had been in the water for 22 hours after falling overboard from the Finnish freighter Finnbeaver.

In November 1980, after a patrol in the Mediterranean Sea, Cincinnati was visited by former President of the United States Richard M. Nixon and Admiral Hyman Rickover for an overnight "familiarization and orientation cruise."

Cincinnati was decommissioned and stricken from the Naval Vessel Register on 29 July 1996. Ex-Cincinnati is scheduled to enter the Nuclear Powered Ship and Submarine Recycling Program in Bremerton, Washington. After an attempt made to preserve her as a museum and memorial in her namesake city failed, the city now plans on acquiring the sail and possibly other artifacts for display on the riverfront.[1]

References[edit]

This article includes information collected from the Naval Vessel Register as well as various press releases and news stories.