USS Thomas (DE-102)

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For other ships of the same name, see USS Thomas.
USS Thomas (DE-102)
Career (United States)
Name: USS Thomas (DE-102)
Namesake: Clarence Crase Thomas
Builder: Dravo Corporation, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
Laid down: 16 January 1943
Launched: 31 July 1943
Commissioned: 21 November 1943
Decommissioned: March 1946
Struck: 22 December 1948
Fate: Transferred to China, 14 December 1948
Career (Republic of China)
Name: ROCS Tai Ho (DE-23)[1][2]
Acquired: 14 December 1948
Out of service: 1972
Fate: Stricken and scrapped, 1972
General characteristics
Class & type: Cannon-class destroyer escort
Displacement: 1,240 tons
Length: 306 ft (93 m)
Beam: 36 ft 8 in (11.2 m)
Draft: 8 ft 9 in (2.7 m)
Propulsion: 4 GM Mod. 16-278A diesel engines with electric drive
4.5 MW (6,000 shp), 2 screws
Speed: 21 knots (39 km/h)
Range: 10,800 nmi. at 12 knots
Complement: 15 officers, 201 enlisted
Armament:   3 × 3 in (76 mm)/50 guns (3×1)
• 2 × 40 mm AA guns (1x2)
• 8 × 20 mm AA guns (8×1)
• 3 × 21 in. torpedo tubes (1×3)
• 8 × depth charge projectors
• 1 × depth charge projector (hedgehog)
• 2 x depth charge tracks

USS Thomas (DE-102) was the second United States Navy ship to be named after Clarence Crase Thomas.

The second USS Thomas was a Cannon class destroyer escort in the United States Navy during World War II. She was laid down by Dravo Corp., Pittsburgh, Pa., on 16 January 1943; launched on 31 July 1943; and commissioned on 21 November 1943.[3][4]

History[edit]

Thomas operated off the east coast during World War II, and was involved in the sinking of three German submarines: U-709, U-233, and U-548. U-233 was rammed by the Thomas after being forced to the surface by depth charges. Thomas rescued 29 survivors, including the Captain.[3]

After being decommissioned at Green Cove Springs, Florida in March 1946,[5] Thomas was transferred to the Chinese Navy on 29 October 1948 and renamed Tai Ho (DE-23).[1][2] Her name was deleted from the US Naval List on 22 December 1948.[3]

"Tai Ho" was involved in a standdown on 30 September 1949 with three American merchant ships of the Isbrandtsen Line off Shanghai. No explanation was given as to the cause but given the location of the incidient, it would be fair guess that the "Tai Ho" was trying to blockade supplies from getting into the city. One American skipper radioed that an "armed ship was mencing" his vessel. Eventually the ROC vessel pulled away without further action. (AP Wire (ajb208th centurytr) 1949)

Tai Ho escaped to Taiwan in 1949 with Nationalist forces. She was stricken from the Republic of China Naval List in 1972 and broken up for scrap.[6]

Honors[edit]

DE-102 received four battle stars for World War II service.[3]

Bronze star
Bronze star
Bronze star
Bronze star
Combat Action Ribbon
American Campaign Medal European-African-Middle Eastern Campaign Medal w/ 4 service stars World War II Victory Medal

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b Bridgeman, Leonard. “311.” Jane's Fighting Aircraft of World War II. London: Studio, 1946.. p. 1973 ships. ISBN 1 85170 493 0.
  2. ^ a b "Thomas (6116709)". Miramar Ship Index. http://www.miramarshipindex.org.nz. Retrieved 4 November 2009. (subscription required)
  3. ^ a b c d USS Thomas page at hazegray.org
  4. ^ USS Thomas page at ibiblio.net
  5. ^ US Navy Historical Center, Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships
  6. ^ USS Thomas page on uboat.net

References[edit]

External links[edit]