USS Timmerman (DD-828)

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USS Timmerman, 15 May 1951, as it launched
Career (USA) Union Navy Jack
Name: USS Timmerman
Namesake: United States Marine Grant F. Timmerman
Builder: Bath Iron Works, Bath, Maine
Laid down: 1 October 1945
Launched: 19 May 1951
Sponsored by: Mrs. Fred Timmerman
Commissioned: 26 September 1952
Decommissioned: 27 July 1956
Reclassified: EDD-828, 4 March 1950; AG-152, 11 January 1954
Struck: 4 April 1958
Fate: sold in 1959 and scrapped
General characteristics
Type: Gearing-class destroyer
Tons burthen: 3,460 tons
Length: 390' 6" (119 m)
Beam: 40' 10" (12.4 m)
Draft: 14' 4" (4.4 m) (Max)
Propulsion: 100,000 SHP (74.5 MW) (in theory); 1 (port) General Electric Turbine 2,000psi/1,050 °F, 1 (starboard) Westinghouse turbine 875psi/1,050 °F (both intended for the cancelled DD-452), 2 screws
Speed: Est. 40–43 knots (74.1–79.6 km/h)
Range: 4500 NM at 20 Knots (8,300 km at 37 km/h)
Complement: 336 officer and enlisted
Armament: 6 x 5"/38 (127 mm/38) AA (3x2), 12 x 40mm AA, 11 x 20mm AA, 10 x 21" tt.(2x5).

USS Timmerman (DD-828/EDD-828/AG-152) was a Gearing-class destroyer; an advanced-design vessel constructed for the U.S. Navy in 1954. After four years of design testing and sea trials, Timmerman was no longer needed, and was scrapped.

Timmerman was originally planned as a Gearing-class destroyer in the United States Navy. Work was temporarily suspended on 7 January 1946 at 45.5% completion. She was later completed as an experimental destroyer, EDD-828. Designed to occupy the same space in standard Gearing engine spaces, Timmerman's machinery was designed to generate 100,000 shp (75,000 kW) vs. the Gearing's 60,000 shp (45,000 kW). She had an aluminum superstructure.

Built in Bath, Maine[edit]

Timmerman (DD-828) was laid down on 1 October 1945 at Bath, Maine, by the Bath Iron Works; assigned to the Atlantic Reserve Fleet on 19 November 1945; launched on 19 May 1951; sponsored by Mrs. Fred Timmerman; and commissioned on 26 September 1952, Comdr. Edward E. Hoffman in command.

Sgt Grant F. Timmerman, Medal of Honor recipient

Timmerman was named for Grant F. Timmerman (19 February 1919 – 8 July 1944) who was a United States Marine who was Killed in action on Saipan, Marianas Islands and posthumously received the Medal of Honor for his heroic actions during World War II.

An experimental design[edit]

Timmerman was constructed as an experimental, light weight, advanced design destroyer to test and evaluate, under operating conditions, advanced design experimental engineering equipment.

As a unit of the Operational Development Force, 1st Naval District, Boston, Massachusetts, she tested her new propulsion system for the next four years. On 11 January 1954, her designation was changed to AG-152, a miscellaneous auxiliary ship.

Inactivation[edit]

The ship was decommissioned at Boston on 27 July 1956. She was moved to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in September and assigned to the Reserve Fleet. In early 1958, Timmerman was declared unfit for further service and struck from the Navy list on 4 April 1958. On 21 April 1959, she was sold to the Boston Metals Co., Baltimore, Maryland, and scrapped.

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