Ugni

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Ugni
Ugni molinae.jpg
Ugni molinae
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
(unranked): Angiosperms
(unranked): Eudicots
(unranked): Rosids
Order: Myrtales
Family: Myrtaceae
Genus: Ugni
Turcz.

Ugni is a genus of plants in the myrtle family Myrtaceae, described as a genus in 1848.[1][2] It is native to western Latin America from the Valdivian temperate rain forests of southern Chile (including the Juan Fernández Islands) and adjacent regions of southern Argentina, north to southern Mexico.[3]

They are shrubs with evergreen foliage, reaching 1–5 m tall. The leaves are opposite, oval, 1–4 cm long and 0.2-2.5 cm broad, entire, glossy dark green, with a spicy scent if crushed. The flowers are drooping, 1–2 cm diameter with four or five white or pale pink petals and numerous short stamens; the fruit is a small red or purple berry 1 cm diameter.[4][5][6]

Species[3]
  1. Ugni candollei (Barnéoud) O.Berg - central + southern Chile
  2. Ugni molinae Turcz. - - central + southern Chile, southern Argentina; naturalized in New Zealand and Juan Fernández Islands
  3. Ugni myricoides (Kunth) O.Berg - Mexico (Hidalgo, Veracruz, Puebla, Oaxaca, Chiapas), Central America, South America (Guyana, Venezuela, Guyana, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, NW Brazil (Amazonas + Roraima)).
  4. Ugni selkirkii (Hook. & Arn.) O.Berg - Robinson Crusoe Island

Etymology[edit]

The scientific name derives from the Mapuche Native American name Uñi for U. molinae. The genus was formerly often included in either Myrtus or Eugenia; it is distinguished from these by the drooping flowers with stamens shorter than the petals.

Uses[edit]

Ugni molinae (syn. Myrtus ugni, Eugenia ugni) is grown as an ornamental plant for its edible (The "Ugniberry" or "strawberry-flavoured berries"). Some commercial "strawberry flavouring" is made from this species, not from strawberries. Myrtus ugni fruits are oblate and up to 1.5 cm in diameter with a purplish to deep cranberry color. They are used to make piquant drinks, desserts, jams, and jellies.[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Turczaninow, Nicolai Stepanowitsch. 1848. Bulletin de la Société Impériale des Naturalistes de Moscou 21(1): 579 in Latin
  2. ^ Tropicos, Ugni Turcz
  3. ^ a b Kew World Checklist of Selected Plant Families
  4. ^ Davidse, G., M. Sousa Sánchez, S. Knapp & F. Chiang Cabrera. 2009. Cucurbitaceae a Polemoniaceae. 4(1): i–xvi, 1–855. In G. Davidse, M. Sousa Sánchez, S. Knapp & F. Chiang Cabrera (eds.) Flora Mesoamericana. Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, México.
  5. ^ Sánchez-Vindas, P. E. 2001. Calycolpus, Eugenia, Myrcia, Myrcianthes, Myrciaria, Pimenta, Plinia, Psidium, Syzygium, Ugni. En: Stevens, W.D., C. Ulloa, A. Pool & O.M. Montiel (eds.), Flora de Nicaragua. Monographs in systematic botany from the Missouri Botanical Garden 85(2): 1566, 1570–1574, 1575–1580
  6. ^ Landrum, L. R. & M. L. Kawasaki. 1997. The genera of Myrtaceae in Brazil: an illustrated synoptic treatment and identification keys. Brittonia 49(4): 508–536
  7. ^ National Academies Press, Lost Crops of the Incas

External links[edit]