Umama bint Abdulmuttalib

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Umama (or Umayma) bint Abdulmuttalib was an aunt of Muhammad.

She was born in Mecca, the daughter of Abdulmuttalib ibn Hashim and Fatimah bint Amr al-Makhzumiya.[1]

She married Jahsh ibn Riyab, an immigrant from the Asad ibn Khuzayma tribe,[2][3] and they had six children.

  1. Abdullah.[4][5][6][7]
  2. Ubaydullah.[8][9][10]
  3. Zaynab, later a wife of Muhammad.[11][12][13][14][15][16]
  4. Abd, who was always known as an adult by his kunya, Abu Ahmad.[17][18][19][20]
  5. Habiba, also known as Umm Habib.[21][22]
  6. Hamna.[23][24][25]

It is not recorded that Umama ever became a Muslim, and she did not accompany her children on their Hijra to Medina in 622.[26] She was still alive in 628, when Muhammad assigned her an annual pension of 40 wasqs of dates from Khaybar.[27]

References[edit]

  1. ^ ibn Saad, Muhammad (1995). Tabaqat vol. 8: The Women of Madina. Ta-Ha Publishers. p. 33. 
  2. ^ Muhammad ibn Ishaq (1955). Sirat Rasul Allah(The Life of Muhammad). Oxford University Press. p. 116. 
  3. ^ Bewley/Saad, p. 33.
  4. ^ Guillaume/Ishaq, pp. 116, 146, 168, 215-217, 230, 286-289, 388, 401.
  5. ^ Bewley/Saad, p. 173.
  6. ^ Watt/McDonald/Tabari, p. 139.
  7. ^ Al-Tabari, Tarikh al-Rusul wa'l-Muluk, vol. 7. Translated by McDonald, M. V. (1987). The Foundation of the Community, pp. 18-23, 29, 134, 137. New York: State University of New York Press.
  8. ^ Guillaume/Ishaq, pp. 99, 146, 529.
  9. ^ Bewley/Saad, p. 68.
  10. ^ Poonawala/Tabari, p. 133.
  11. ^ Guillaume/Ishaq, pp. 215, 495.
  12. ^ Ibn Hisham note 918.
  13. ^ Bewley/Saad, pp. 72-81.
  14. ^ Al-Tabari, Tarikh al-Rusul wa'l-Muluk, vol. 8. Translated by Fishbein, M. (1997). The Victory of Islam, pp. 1-4, 61. New York: State University of New York Press.
  15. ^ Al-Tabari, Tarikh al-Rusul wa'l-Muluk, vol. 9. Translated by Poonawala, I. K. (1990). The Last Years of the Prophet, pp. 23, 127, 134, 137, 168. New York: State University of New York Press.
  16. ^ Al-Tabari, Tarikh al-Rusul wa'l-Muluk, vol. 39. Translated by Landau-Tasseron, E. (1998). Biographies of the Prophet's Companions and Their Successors, pp. 9, 180-182. New York: State University of New York Press.
  17. ^ Guillaume/Ishaq, pp. 116, 215-217, 230.
  18. ^ Ibn Hisham note 918.
  19. ^ Bewley/Saad, pp. 33, 80-81.
  20. ^ Al-Tabari, Tarikh al-Rusul wa'l-Muluk, vol. 6. Translated by Watt, W. M., & McDonald, M. V. (1988). Muhammad at Mecca, p. 139.
  21. ^ Guillaume/Ishaq, pp. 215, 523.
  22. ^ Bewley/Saad, pp. 170-171.
  23. ^ Guillaume/Ishaq, pp. 215, 389, 495, 499, 522.
  24. ^ Bewley/Saad, pp. 33, 170.
  25. ^ Fishbein/Tabari, pp. 61, 63.
  26. ^ Guillaume/Ishaq p. 215.
  27. ^ Bewley/Saad p. 33.