Umegatani Tōtarō II

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Umegatani Tōtarō
梅ヶ谷 藤太郎
Umegatani Totaro Ⅱ.jpg
Personal information
Born Otojiro Oshida
(1878-03-11)March 11, 1878
Toyama, Japan
Died September 2, 1927(1927-09-02) (aged 49)
Height 1.68 m (5 ft 6 in)
Weight 158 kg (348 lb)
Career
Stable Ikazuchi
Record 168-27-116
47draws-2holds(Makuuchi)
Debut June, 1892
Highest rank Yokozuna (June, 1903)
Retired May, 1915
Championships 3 (Makuuchi, unofficial)
* Up to date as of October 2007.

Umegatani Tōtarō II (梅ヶ谷 藤太郎, March 11, 1878 – September 2, 1927) was a sumo wrestler from Toyama City, Toyama Prefecture, Japan. He was the sport's 20th yokozuna. Umegatani had a great rivalry with yokozuna Hitachiyama Taniemon. Their era was known as the Ume-Hitachi Era and it brought sumo to heights of popularity never before seen in the Meiji period.[1]

Career[edit]

He was adopted by the 15th yokozuna Umegatani Tōtarō I and joined his Ikazuchi stable in June 1892 at the age of 14. His father was initially reluctant to let him join at such a young age but Umegatani I personally guaranteed his well-being.[1]

In the stable, he was trained by Onigatani.[1] He rose through the ranks quickly, making his jūryō debut in January 1897 and reaching the top makuuchi division in January 1898. Initially wrestling under the sumo name of Umenotani Otomatsu, he officially took on the Umegatani Tōtarō name before his fourth basho as an ōzeki in January 1902. He met Hitachiyama in May 1903 when both ōzeki were undefeated. The clash caused great excitement throughout Japan.[1] Although Umegatani lost the match, after the tournament both he and Hitachiyama were promoted to yokozuna, Umegatani's promotion being awarded at Hitachiyama's insistence.

Umegatani had reached sumo's highest rank at the age of 25 years and 3 months, making him the youngest ever yokozuna at that time. The record stood until the promotion of Terukuni in 1942.[1]

He won at least 3 championships before June 1909, when the yūshō system was established by the Mainichi Shimbun newspaper (the Japan Sumo Association officially recognised the system in 1926). There were two other instances where Umegatani achieved championship level performances not recorded as such by all sources. In the first, in the summer 1898 tournament, Umegatani tied ōzeki Asashio Taro I with a 7-1-1-1draw record. Also, in the spring 1904 tournament, Umegatani finished with a record of 7-1-1 and 1 hold, slightly better than west yokozuna Hitachiyama Taniemon's 7-1-2 record, and a number of sources include this as an unofficial championship. Umegatani won the 1909 spring tournament, the last tournament before the yūshō system began in June 1909. Although he didn't win any championships officially, he was given a prize frame in honor of his contribution when he retired in June 1915. This was his prize frame for his career from between the June 1909 tournament and the January 1910 tournament. His bouts were more masterly than his record because his techniques were orthodox methods. Although he was extremely heavy for his short height, he showed great skill.[2]

Umegatani (right) vs Hitachiyama

He missed many bouts in his later career due to illness, retiring at the age of 37. In the top makuuchi division, he won 168 bouts and lost 27 bouts, recording a winning percentage of 86.2. So many people wished to attend his retirement ceremony that it was held over three days.[1] He died at the age of 49 whilst still active in sumo as a shimpan (judge) and head of Ikazuchi stable. The stable folded upon his death.

Top division record[edit]

  • Some sources record two more of Umegatani's tournaments as having won or tied the tournament. See above.
Umegatani Tōtarō II[3][4]
- Spring Summer
1898 West Maegashira #5
5–2–1
1d 1h

 
West Maegashira #2
7–1–1
1d

 
1899 West Komusubi
7–1–1
1d

 
West Sekiwake
6–2–1
1d

 
1900 West Komusubi
5–2–1
2d

 
East Ōzeki
6–1–2
1d

 
1901 West Ōzeki
8–1–1
 
West Ōzeki
6–2–1
1d

 
1902 East Ōzeki
8–0–1
1d
Unofficial

 
East Ōzeki
8–1–1
 
1903 East Ōzeki
4–0–5
1d

 
East Ōzeki
8–1–1
 
1904 East Yokozuna
7–1–1
1h

 
East Yokozuna
6–1–2
1d

 
1905 East Yokozuna
8–1–1
 
East Yokozuna
5–0–5
 
1906 East Yokozuna
7–1–1
1d

 
East Yokozuna
7–0–2
1d

 
1907 East Yokozuna
1–0–9
 
East Yokozuna
6–2–1
1d

 
1908 East Yokozuna
8–0–1
1d
Unofficial

 
East Yokozuna
7–1–1
1d

 
1909 West Yokozuna
7–0–2
1d
Unofficial

 
West Yokozuna
5–0–5
 
1910 West Yokozuna
0–1–9
 
West Yokozuna
0–0–9
1d

 
1911 East Yokozuna
3–1
6d

 
Sat out
1912 East Yokozuna
5–1
4d

 
West Yokozuna
1–1–5-3d
 
1913 West Yokozuna
4–1
5d

 
West Yokozuna
0–1–8
1d

 
1914 East Yokozuna
2–0–6
2d

 
West Yokozuna
0–0–9
1d

 
1915 West Yokozuna
1–0–7
2d

 
East Yokozuna
Retired
0–0–10
Record given as win-loss-absent    Top Division Champion Retired Lower Divisions

Key:  =Kinboshi(s);   d=Draw(s) (引分);   h=Hold(s) (預り)
Divisions: MakuuchiJūryōMakushitaSandanmeJonidanJonokuchi

Makuuchi ranks: YokozunaŌzekiSekiwakeKomusubiMaegashira

*Championships for the best record in a tournament were not recognized or awarded before the 1909 summer tournament and the above unofficial championships are historically conferred. For more information see yūshō.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f "Rikishi of Old: Umegatani II". Sumo Fan Magazine. June 2005. Retrieved 2007-10-10. 
  2. ^ Newton, Clyde (1994). Dynamic Sumo. Kodansha. p. 56. ISBN 4-7700-1802-9. 
  3. ^ "Umegatani Tōrarō II Rikishi Information". Sumo Reference. Retrieved 2007-10-10. 
  4. ^ 大相撲優勝力士 (in Japanese). ja.wikipedia. Retrieved 2007-10-20. 

External links[edit]

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Hitachiyama Taniemon
20th Yokozuna
1903 - 1915
Next:
Wakashima Gonshirō
Yokozuna is not a successive rank, and more than one wrestler can share the title