Umfraville

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Umfraville is the name of an English baronial family, derived from Amfreville in Normandy. Members of this family obtained lands in Northumberland, including Redesdale and Prudhoe, from the Norman kings, and a later member, Gilbert de Umfraville (died 1245), married Matilda, daughter of Malcolm, earl of Angus, and obtained this Scottish earldom.

Gilbert's son, Gilbert de Umfraville, Earl of Angus (c. 1244-1308), took part in the fighting between Henry III of England and his barons, and in the Scottish expeditions of Edward I of England. He was governor of Forfar and was given the right of appointing the wardens of the marches.

His son Robert, earl of Angus (1277–1325), was taken prisoner by the Scots at Bannockburn, but was soon released, though he was deprived of the earldom of Angus and of his Scottish estates.[1]

Robert de Umfraville, Earl of Angus, Lord Umfreville.

m firstly LUCY de Kyme, daughter of Sir PHILIP de Kyme 1st Lord Kyme & his wife --- le Bigod. A manuscript genealogy of the Gant family records that “Roberto de Umphravil comiti de Anguishe” married “Willielmus de Kyma… Luciæ sorori suæ”[18].

m secondly as her first husband, Eleanor (Alienor) Lumley, (b.abt 1297 d. 31 March 1368) daughter of Robert de Lumley and Mary FitzMarmaduke. She married secondly (before 16 August 1327) Sir Roger Mauduit of Eshot, co. Northumberland.

Earl Robert & his first wife had one child:

1. GILBERT de Umfreville (1310-6 January 1381). A manuscript genealogy of the Gant family names “Gilbertus Umphravil” as son of “Roberto de Umphravil comiti de Anguishe” and his wife “Willielmus de Kyma…Luciæ sorori suæ”, adding that he died without heirs and was succeeded by “Waltero Taylboys filio filiæ sororis suæ”[19]. He succeeded his father in 1325 as Earl of Angus, Lord Unfreville. He was disinherited in Scotland in 1329. m firstly JOAN Willoughby, daughter of Sir ROBERT Willoughby 1st Lord Willoughby & his wife Margaret Deincourt (-16 July 1350). m secondly (before October 1369) MAUD de Lucy, daughter of Sir THOMAS Lucy 2nd Lord Lucy & his wife Margaret Multon (-18 December 1398). She married secondly (before 3 October 1383) as his second wife, Henry Percy 1st Earl of Northumberland. Earl Gilbert & his first wife had one child:

a) Sir ROBERT de Umfreville (-before 25 May 1368). m (licence 20 January 1340) as her first husband, MARGARET Percy, daughter of Sir HENRY Percy Lord Percy & his wife Idoine Clifford (-Gyng [Buttsbury], Essex September 1375). She married secondly (before 25 May 1368) as his second wife, Sir William Ferrers 3rd Lord Ferrers of Groby.

2. ELIZABETH de Umfreville . A manuscript genealogy of the Gant family records that “Gilbertus Umphravil” was succeeded by “Waltero Taylboys filio filiæ sororis suæ”[20]. m GILBERT de Boroughdon [Burdon].

Earl Robert & his second wife Eleanor (Alienor) Lumley ..had two children:

3.ROBERT de Umfreville (-before 10 October 1379).

4.THOMAS de Umfreville of Hessle, Yorkshire, and Holmside, co. Durham (-21 May 1387). He inherited the castle of Harbottle and the manor of Otterburn 1375[21] m[22] JOAN de Roddam, daughter of ADAM de Roddam & his wife ---. Thomas & his wife had two children:

a) Sir THOMAS de Umfreville of Harbottle (1360-12 February or 8 March 1391). m AGNES GREY (b.abt 1365 d.25 October 1420), daughter of Thomas de Grey and Margaret de Pressene--. Sir Thomas & his wife had six children:
i) Sir GILBERT de Umfreville of Harbottle (Harbottle Castle 18 October 1390-killed in battle Baugé, Anjou 22 March 1421). m (before 3 February 1413) ANNE Neville, daughter of RALPH Neville 1st Earl of Westmoreland & his first wife Margaret Stafford of Stafford.
ii) ELIZABETH de Umfreville (1391-23 November 1424). m Sir WILLIAM Elmeden of Elmeden [Embleton], co. Durham.
iii) MAUD de Umfreville (1393-4 January 1435). m Sir WILLIAM Ryther of Ryther, Yorkshire.
iv) JOAN de Umfreville (1395-after 1446). m Sir THOMAS Lambert .
v) MARGARET de Umfreville (1397-23 June 1444). m firstly WILLIAM Lodington of Gunby, co. Lincoln (-9 January 1420). m secondly (before 26 April 1423) JOHN Constable of Halsham in Holderness.
vi) AGNES de Umfreville (1399-after 1446). m THOMAS Haggerston of Haggerston, co. Durham.
b) Sir ROBERT de Umfreville (-before 10 October 1379).

(From: Medieval Lands Project-Scottish Nobility)- www.fmg.ac

His first son and heir by Lucy de Kyme, Gilbert de Umfraville (1310–81), claimed the earldom, which he hoped to gain by helping Edward Baliol to win the Scottish crown, but he failed, and on his death without issue the greater part of his English estates passed to his niece, Eleanor, the wife of Sir Henry Talboys (died 1370), while others, including Redesdale, Harbottle, and Otterbourne, came to his half-brother, Sir Thomas de Umfraville (d.1386) a son by Lady Eleanor(Alienor) Lumley. Sir Thomas's son, another Sir Thomas de Umfraville (1362–91), left a son, Gilbert de Umfraville (1390–1421), who fought on the Scottish border and in France under his warlike uncle, Sir Robert de Umfraville (died 1436).

Although not related in blood he appears to have inherited the estates in Lincolnshire of the Kyme family, and he was generally known as the Earl of Kyme, though the title was never properly conferred upon him. In 1415 he fought at the Battle of Agincourt; he was afterwards sent as an ambassador to Charles VI of France, and arranged an alliance between the English and the Burgundians. He was killed at the Battle of Baugé on 22 March 1421.

His heir was his uncle Sir Robert, who died on 29 January 1436, when the male line of the Umfraville family became extinct. The chronicler John Hardyng was for many years in the service of Sir Robert, and in his Chronicle he eulogizes various members of the family.[1]

Dickie Umfraville was a much-married character in Anthony Powell's novel series A Dance to the Music of Time.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Public Domain One or more of the preceding sentences incorporates text from a publication now in the public domainChisholm, Hugh, ed. (1911). "Umfraville". Encyclopædia Britannica 27 (11th ed.). Cambridge University Press. p. 577.