Unaka Range

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
The Unaka Mountains

The Unaka Range is a mountain range on the border of Tennessee and North Carolina, in the southeastern United States. It is a subrange of the Appalachian Mountains and is part of the Blue Ridge Mountains physiographic province. The Unakas stretch approximately from the Nolichucky River to the south to the Watauga River to the north. The Unakas include the prominent Roan Highlands, where several summits rise above 6,000 feet. The Iron Mountains border the Unakas to the north, and the Bald Mountains border the Unakas opposite the Nolichucky to the south.[1] The name unaka is rooted in the Cherokee term unega, meaning "white".[2]

The Cherokee National Forest and the Pisgah National Forest protect large sections of the Unaka Mountains. The Appalachian Trail traverses the Unaka crest.

In some geological and in historical sources, the term "Unaka Range" is used to identify the entire crest of the Appalachian Mountains along the Tennessee-North Carolina border, including the Unakas, the Great Smoky Mountains, the Bald Mountains, the Unicoi Mountains, and the mountains in the Big Frog Wilderness and Little Frog Mountain Wilderness.

Notable peaks[edit]

The highest point in the Unaka Range is Roan High Knob, which rises to an elevation of 6,285 feet (1,916 m).

Peak Name Elevation (ft) Land NC0573Flag of North Carolina.svg TN0621Flag of Tennessee.svg Prominence Isolation
Roan High Knob 6,285 Cherokee/Pisgah Mitchell Carter 3,485 18.81
Roan High Bluff 6,178 Pisgah Mitchell 187 1.54
Cloudland Mountain 6,267 Cherokee/Pisgah Mitchell Carter
Grassy Ridge Bald 6,189 Pisgah Avery, Mitchell 688 2.35
Round Bald 5,807 Cherokee/Pisgah Mitchell Carter
Jane Bald 5,807 Cherokee/Pisgah Mitchell Carter
Hump Mountain 5,587 Pisgah Avery
Little Yellow Mountain 5,504 Pisgah Avery, Mitchell
Hawk Mountain 5,443 Pisgah Mitchell
Big Yellow Mountain 5,440 Pisgah Avery

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Topographical Map of Chestoa, TN". TopoQuest. Retrieved 2011-06-07. . Retrieved: 25 July 2008.
  2. ^ Mooney, James (1972). Myths of the Cherokee and Sacred Formulas of the Cherokee. Nashville, Tennessee: C and R Elder Publishers. p. 542. OCLC 729245899. 

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 36°6′10″N 82°21′47″W / 36.10278°N 82.36306°W / 36.10278; -82.36306