Underground Album

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Underground Album
Studio album by David Allan Coe, The David Allan Coe Band
Released 1982
Genre Country
Length 31:13
Label D.A.C.
Producer David Allan Coe
David Allan Coe chronology
Rough Rider
(1982)
Underground Album
(1982)
Castles in the Sand
(1983)

Underground Album is the 21st studio album by American country musician David Allan Coe. It was released as a mail order album, not sold in stores, only through the back pages of the motorcycling magazine Easyriders and in the concession stand at his shows.[1]

Lyrics[edit]

Underground Album is Coe's followup to his 1978 album Nothing Sacred and contains profane, sexually explicit lyrics.

Reception[edit]

Professional ratings
Review scores
Source Rating
Allmusic 3/5 stars[2]

The album was generally criticized as being profane and crude.[3][4] Allmusic, which did not review the album, gave it three out of five stars.[2] "Nigger Fucker" resulted in Coe being accused of racism.[4][5] Neil Strauss described the album's material as "among the most racist, misogynist, homophobic and obscene songs recorded by a popular songwriter."[6] Coe responded to the accusations by stating "Anyone that hears this album and says I'm a racist is full of shit".[7] He also stated that he contacted Strauss during the writing of the article, but Strauss only acknowledged talking to Coe's manager, who would only comment off the record.[1]

Track listing[edit]

All songs written by David Allan Coe

  1. "Rock and Roll Fever" - 3:10
  2. "Panheads Forever" - 3:09
  3. "Nigger Fucker" - 2:28
  4. "Coffee" - 5:28
  5. "One Monkey" - 3:14
  6. "One More Time" - 3:13
  7. "Little Sussie Shallow Throat" - 2:57
  8. "Pick Em, Lick Em, Stick Em" - 2:56
  9. "Don't Bite the Dick" - 2:27
  10. "Fuckin' in the Butt" - 2:11

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Tom Netherland (November 2000). "David Allan Coe rebuts racism charge". Country Standard Time. Retrieved 21 August 2011. 
  2. ^ a b "Underground Album". Allmusic. Retrieved 21 August 2011. 
  3. ^ Steve Eng. "Hello, Textas--Hello, St. Barts (and Montserrat)". Jimmy Buffett: The Man from Margaritaville Revealed. p. 217. ISBN 0-312-16875-6. 
  4. ^ a b "White trash alchemies of the abject sublime". Bad music: the music we love to hate. Christopher Washburne, Maiken Derno. p. 37. ISBN 0-415-94366-3. 
  5. ^ Mark Kemp. Dixie Lullaby: A Story of Music, Race, and New Beginnings in a New South. p. 204. ISBN 0-8203-2872-3. 
  6. ^ Neil Strauss (September 4, 2000). "Songwriter's Racist Songs From 1980's Haunt Him". The New York Times. Retrieved 21 August 2011. 
  7. ^ Dan Leroy (July 14, 2005). "Coe Revisits Penitentiary". Rolling Stone. Retrieved 21 August 2011. 

External links[edit]