Uni-President Enterprises Corporation

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Uni-President Enterprises Corporation
統一企業公司
Type Public (TWSE: 1216)
Industry Food production
Founded 1967
Founder(s) Kao Ching-yuen
Headquarters Yongkang District, Tainan City, Taiwan
Products Dairy product
Beverages
Snack foods
Instant noodles
Revenue Increase NT$46.025 billion (2007)
Employees 4,994
Subsidiaries President Chain Stores
COSMED
books.com.tw
Dream Mall
Website Official website
Uni-President Enterprises Corporation
Traditional Chinese 統一企業公司
Simplified Chinese 统一企业公司

Uni-President Enterprises Corporation (TWSE: 1216) (traditional Chinese: 統一企業公司; simplified Chinese: 统一企业公司; pinyin: Tǒngyī Qǐyè Gōngsī; Wade–Giles: T'ung-i Chi-yeh) is an international food conglomerate based in Tainan, Taiwan. It is the largest food production company in Taiwan as well as Asia, and has a significant market share in dairy product, foods and snacks, and beverages markets. It is also responsible for running Starbucks, 7-Eleven, Mister Donut and Carrefour in Taiwan. In addition, Uni-President also has subsidiaries in Mainland China and Thailand.[1]

Furthermore, Uni-President is also the owner of Uni-President Lions, a professional baseball team in Taiwan's Chinese Professional Baseball League.

Food safety incidents[edit]

Main article: 3-MCPD

In 2001, the United Kingdom Food Standards Agency (FSA) found in tests of various sauces including soy sauces that some 22% of samples contained a chemical carcinogen called 3-MCPD at levels considerably higher than those deemed safe by the European Union as well as 1,3-DCP its derivative. [2]

Food Standards Australia New Zealand (FSANZ, formerly ANZFA) followed FSA research and took actions. "President Creamy Soy Sauce" from Taiwan is on the ban list in the second round testing.[3]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ 統一企業網站 研究發展
  2. ^ SOY SAUCE – PUBLIC HEALTH ADVICE Food Standards Agency 2001
  3. ^ TESTS SHOW MORE SOY SAUCES ARE UNSAFE Food Standards Australia New Zealand, 8 October 2001