Union City High School

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Union City High School
6.20.13UnionCityHighSchoolByLuigiNovi.jpg
Location
2500 Kennedy Boulevard
Union City, NJ 07087

Information
Type Public high school
Established 2009
Principal John Bennetti[1][2]
Faculty 181.2 (on FTE basis)[3]
Grades 10 - 12[4][5]
Enrollment 2,423 (as of 2011-12)[3]
Student to teacher ratio 13.37:1[3]
Color(s) Navy blue and silver[6]
Athletics conference Hudson County Interscholastic League
Team name Soaring Eagles
Website

Union City High School is a three-year[4] comprehensive public high school serving students in tenth through twelfth grades from Union City, in Hudson County, New Jersey, United States, operating as part of the Union City Board of Education. The four-story[7] school is located between Kennedy Boulevard and Summit Avenue, from 24th to 26th Street, with additional facilities a block south on Kerrigan Avenue.[4] Through its predecessors, the school has been accredited by the Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Secondary Schools since 1928.[8]

As of the 2011-12 school year, the school had an enrollment of 2,423 students and 181.2 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 13.37:1. There were 2,062 students (85.1% of enrollment) eligible for free lunch and 202 (8.3% of students) eligible for reduced-cost lunch.[3]

The school opened in September 2009, merging the student bodies of the city's prior two high schools, Union Hill High School and Emerson High School, and marking the first high school opened in the city in 90 years.[9] The school, which was built on the site of the former Roosevelt Stadium, cost $180 million, covers 4½ acres and includes a rooftop football field.[10] The school's colors are navy blue and silver.[6]

Grade structure[edit]

The Academy for Enrichment and Advancement.

Union City High School holds only Sophomore through Senior students.[5] The Academy for Enrichment and Advancement (AEA), which is housed one block south on Kerrigan Avenue between 22nd and 23rd Streets, is a special interest academy that is part of the High School. The AEA provides classes for students of grades 9 - 12 who show interest in the fields of science and engineering.[11]

Since its inaugural school year, Union City High School has offered college-level courses to students, and through its partnerships with nearby colleges and universities, increased the number of such courses for the 2010–2011 school year, enabling students to accumulate up to 12 - 15 college credits by graduation that can be readily transferred to New Jersey public colleges.[12] In addition to Liberal Arts courses, students can take advanced placement biology, chemistry, physics, anatomy & physiology, forensic science, robotics, geometry, algebra 2, and calculus at the AEA. Students preparing for civil engineering and architecture careers can take pre-engineering, computer networking and computer aided design (CAD) at the AEA. The AEA is also one of the few high schools in New Jersey that offers a course in Mandarin Chinese.[13]

History[edit]

The site on which Union City High School sits was originally the location of the Hudson County Consumers Brewery Company. It was purchased for $456,000, and turned it into a gated playground. Through the efforts of Director of Public Affairs Harry J. Thorout and the Federal Works Progress Administration, which awarded the project $172,472, as part of Franklin D. Roosevelt's New Deal, it was turned into the art deco Roosevelt Stadium, which opened in 1937.[14] Though primarily a football stadium that served as a home to future National Football League greats Lou Cordileone and Frank Winters and College Football Hall of Famer Ed Franco, the stadium also housed events in semi-pro baseball, soccer, track, boxing, as well as numerous special events, such as an exhibition baseball game featuring Babe Ruth and Lou Gehrig.[15] Roosevelt Stadium was also the home to the annual Thanksgiving Turkey Game between rivals Emerson High School and Union Hill High School, the two high schools that previously served the city. The last Turkey Game was hosted by the stadium in 2004.[14] Three subsequent Turkey Games were held at the Midtown Athletic Complex until 2007, after which the two high schools would be converted into middle schools.[6] José Martí Middle School, which is located on Summit Avenue at 18th Street, was converted into José Martí Freshman Academy.

Commencement ceremony for the school's first graduating class, June 23, 2010. At the podium is New Jersey Supreme Court Justice Roberto A. Rivera-Soto, giving the keynote speech.

On July 11, 2005, acting New Jersey Governor Richard Codey and Union City Mayor Brian P. Stack, along with other officials, broke ground in preparation for the new complex, budgeted at $180 million. $172 million of the funds were provided by the state, with Union City providing the remaining $8 million, making it one of the most expensive schools in New Jersey.[6][10] Cliffside Park-based RSC Architects, in partnership with architecture firm HOK New York, designed the 360,000-square-foot (33,000 m2) school, which includes 66 classrooms. Piscataway-based Epic Management served as the construction manager for the project.[16] In early March 2006, a large piece of the Hudson Brewery's original brick foundation was found intact, along with the base of a manhole still connected to an original sewer that opened underneath the brewery. The artifacts were removed for historical preservation.[17]

Union City High School opened for students on September 3, 2009,[18] marking the first high school built in Union City in 90 years.[9] The school's inaugural principal was David Wilcomes.[19] A ribbon-cutting ceremony was held on September 25, and attended by Union City Mayor Brian P. Stack, New Jersey Governor Jon Corzine and Senator Bob Menendez.[9][20] A subsequent opening gala was held September 26, and featured appearances from celebrities such as New York Giant Harry Carson, and actor and Union Hill High School graduate Bobby Cannavale, and a performance by musician Tito Puente, Jr.[21] A performance by Cuban singer Cucu Diamantes was cancelled by the city's Board of Education, causing controversy. The Board cancelled the performance in response to threats of protest by anti-Castro activists over Diamantes' performance in a concert in Havana, Cuba days earlier.[22][23]

The Student Sanctuary, seen shortly after it opened.

The commencement ceremony for the school's first graduating class was held June 23, 2010. Delivering the keynote speech to the 628 graduates was New Jersey State Associate Supreme Court Justice Roberto A. Rivera-Soto.[24][25]

On October 28, 2011, the city broke ground on the school's $930,000, state-funded Student Sanctuary, a 16,900 square foot, triangular landscaped pedestrian plaza in front of the school at the corner of Kennedy Boulevard at 24th Street. On December 18, 2012, the school's 50-year time capsule was filled with items representing the school and then buried on the Sanctuary grounds, with a scheduled opening in 2061. The Sanctuary, which was designed by Becica Associates L.L.C., Borst Landscape and Design, and Environmental Resolutions Inc., was opened with a ribbon-cutting ceremony on May 22, 2013, marking the completion of the school. It features a small amphitheater, a rain garden, a functioning waterfall, a fountain, decorative brick paved walkways, patios, and over 100 different species of all-season shrubs and grasses. The Sanctuary provides e a point of relaxation to students and residents, and has been referred to by students and the press alike as a "tranquil oasis stylishly [that] contrasts with the urban surrounding." In addition to its rural features, which provides research opportunities for the school's environmental sciences classes and its horticultural and environment clubs, the Sanctuary also features technological conveniences such as free Wi-Fi to allows students and staff to use their equipment outside, and in-ground speakers that allow the amphitheater to host performances and other events.[2][26]

Faculty and staff[edit]

Former athlete Otis Davis, who won two gold medals in track and field events at the 1960 Summer Olympics, works at Union City High School as coach, mentor and verification officer. He is also co-founder and current president of the Tri-States Olympic Alumni Association, mentors student athletes at the school.[27][28]

In July 2012, English as a Second Language (ESL) teacher Kristine Nazzal was named Hudson County's Teacher of the Year by the New Jersey Department of Education. Nazzal was among 300 teachers who appeared on the September 23, 2012 episode of NBC Nightly News with Brian Williams to discuss issues pertaining to education.[29][30][31]

Academic achievements[edit]

UCHS teacher Kristine Nazzal, who was named Hudson County Teacher of the year in 2012, getting her copy of Improbable Scholars signed by Professor David Kirp at an event held at the school. In the book, Kirp spotlights Union City's education system, in particular UCHS.

The school was the 301st-ranked public high school in New Jersey out of 339 schools statewide in New Jersey Monthly magazine's September 2014 cover story on the state's "Top Public High Schools", using a new ranking methodology.[32] The school had been ranked 323rd in the state of 328 schools in 2012.[33] The magazine ranked the two predecessor schools 271st (Emerson) and 285th (Union Hill) out of 322 public high schools statewide, in the magazine's September 2010 cover story on the state's "Top Public High Schools", after being ranked 288th (Emerson) and 233rd (Union Hill) in 2008 out of 316 public high schools statewide.[34]

University of California, Berkeley Professor David L. Kirp, in his 2011 book, Kids First, and his 2013 book, Improbable Scholars, praised Union City's education system for bringing poor, mostly immigrant children (three quarters of whom live in homes where only Spanish is spoken and a quarter of which are thought to be undocumented and fearful of deportation) into the educational mainstream. Kirp, who spent a year in Union City examining its schools, notes that while in the late 1970s, Union City schools faced the threat of state takeover, as of 2013 they boast achievement scores that approximate the statewide average. Kirp also observes that in 2011, Union City boasted a high school graduation rate of 89.5 percent — roughly 10 percentage points higher than the national average, and that in 2012, 75 percent of Union City graduates enrolled in college, with top students winning scholarships to the Ivy League.[19][35] Kirp attributes Union City's success to among other things, the positive educational atmosphere of Union City High School generated by educators such as principal John Bennetti.[35][36][37] Deborah Short of the Center for Applied Linguistics in Washington DC singled out the school's initiatives, saying that the Union City High School "has created a culture that respects differences and promotes learning. The school expects its students to do well and it gives them lots of support."[38]

Facilities[edit]

A science classroom equipped with an overhead projector and a SMART Board.

The 360,000-square-foot (33,000 m2) school houses 66 classrooms equipped with Mac computers, automatic lights, SMART Boards[39] and Wi-Fi to enable students to use laptop computers in their studies.[4][21]

The arts are served by two art class rooms devoted to painting, sculpture and pottery,[4] sewing machine-equipped rooms for fashion classes, television production facilities,[7] and three music classrooms, each of which is equipped with grand pianos. Dancers have two separate rooms with floor to ceiling mirrors and ballet bars. The school's cafeteria is located on the second floor and is equipped with several walk-in freezers and a half-dozen pizza ovens.[4] The school's restrooms utilize automated no-touch sinks.[21]

The school's "world-class" gym includes bleachers that seat 1,800 people, and a weight room accessible directly from the gym. Elsewhere on the first floor is an aerobics room that houses cardio exercise machines.[9][16]

A centrally located Media Center is located on the first floor and includes dozens of Mac computers.[9] Although it was initially suggested to name the room after Pulitzer Prize-winning poet and United States Poet Laureate W.S. Merwin, who grew up in Union City,[40] it was eventually named after former New Jersey Governor Jim McGreevey.[9] It is located next to the outdoor Senior Courtyard. An American flag that stands in that courtyard, when raised, overlooks the athletic field.[4] The Media Center is also used for community functions, such as an April 2011 book signing by Professor David L. Kirp.[41]

The school's centerpiece is its three-acre athletic field, called the Eagle's Nest, located on the second floor roof,[42] which features skyline views of the Empire State Building and Midtown Manhattan. The architecture of the athletic complex, which cost $15 million, was designed to resemble the former Roosevelt Stadium, which previously occupied the site. A number of classrooms on the third and fourth floors overlook the field, which rests on two floors of steel and reinforced concrete. The field's bleachers seat 2,100 spectators. The field's on-campus location eliminates not only the students' prior need to walk or be bussed from school to a separate location to play, but the need for the two prior schools to share the field. Although the merger of the former Union Hill Hillers and Emerson Bulldogs had experienced some difficulties a year prior when the students were still housed at separate high schools (called Union City High School's North and South campuses, respectively), the merge had been ameliorated by the move of the unified student body to the single new school. Hudson Reporter columnist Jim Hague opined that the athletic facility is perhaps the most unique in the state.[4][6][7][16][43][44] It was included in a list of "10 more high school football stadiums to see before you die" that appeared in a 2012 article for MaxPreps.[42]

The school's 910-seat auditorium, which also serves as the Union City Performing Arts Center.

The school's 910-seat auditorium also serves as the Union City Performing Arts Center. The Center opened on October 16, 2009 with a celebration that featured an art gallery of over 160 paintings, as well as performances by a number of musicians, poets and dancers. Included in the performances were a guitar solo by Francisco "Pancho" Navarro, who appeared in 2002 Salma Hayek film Frida, a dance performance by Tap Ole Dance Company that was choreographed by Megan Fernandez, who had appeared on the reality television program America's Got Talent, and a poetry reading by Graciela Barreto, who had been named poet laureate of Union City in September.[45][46] Drama classes are aided with a separate black box theater for small productions, which doubles as a community conference center.[4] Public events used by the auditorium including the 2010 swearing-in ceremony for Union City Mayor Brian P. Stack,[47] and the Union City International Film Festival, the first one of which was held in December 2010.[48] The school's athletic field and auditorium are made available to local residents in order to utilize the school as a community center for the city.[6]

The federally funded, social services nonprofit group, North Hudson Community Action Corporation's (NHCAC) pediatric health center, which is housed in the building, opened in early July 2010, in order to allow the corporation's facilities on 31st Street to expand its women's health and internal medicine capacity. The center was opened in July so that the patient flow could be monitored when students were not in school, in order to determine how to integrate the center's operations with the school's, educate students on managing their health, and allow them to utilize its services in order to decrease health-related absenteeism, once the school session resumed.[49] Union City Superintendent of Schools Stanley Sanger indicated that eventually, health screenings would be provided to all Union City students.[12] NHCAC runs a health screening facility six days a week by two doctors. The facility has a separate entrance/exit from the street, and is closed off to the rest of the school.[4] The state-of-the-art 2,286-square-foot (212.4 m2) full pediatric facility includes four private examination rooms and an on-site laboratory. It is open to low-income Hudson County families and sees approximately 20-25 patients 18 and under daily, charging sliding-scale fees for its services, though NHCAC President and city commissioner Christopher Irizarry expressed hopes to eventually increase that capacity to 50 patients a day. It is the third of NHCAC's ten such facilities in North Hudson, New Jersey to implement electronic health record-keeping, which allows patients to schedule appointments online, see doctors more quickly and facilitate quicker lab results and filling of prescriptions at pharmacies.[49]

The staff's parking garage, built a block south of the school, also serves nearby residents and business.[16]

Athletics[edit]

The school's athletic field, called the Eagle's Nest, is located on the second floor roof.

The Union City High School Soaring Eagles compete in the Hudson County Interscholastic League, following a reorganization of sports leagues in North Jersey by the New Jersey State Interscholastic Athletic Association (NJSIAA).[50] With 2,316 students in grades 10-12, the school was classified by the NJSIAA for the 2014-15 school year as North I, Group IV for most athletic competition purposes, which included schools with an enrollment of 1,108 to 2,479 students in that grade range.[51] Prior to the 2010 realignment, the school had been assigned to the North Jersey Tri-County Conference for the 2009-10 season.[52][53]

Union City High School's first head football coach was Joe Rotondi,[6][53] previously the coach at Union Hill High School,[44] who was appointed to the position when that school merged with Emerson High School for the 2008-09 season. Due to a less successful than anticipated record (5-5 in 2008 and 3-7 in 2009), he was replaced by former Ferris High School coach Wilbur Valdez in early 2010.[54]

In addition to fielding a team in football, Union City High school fields teams in wrestling, basketball, soccer, volleyball, bowling, baseball, cross county, lacrosse, swimming, tennis and track and field.[55][56][57][58][59][60]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Bennetti, John. "John Bennetti". Union City High School. Accessed November 6, 2011.
  2. ^ a b Pope, Gennarose. "Urban oasis for Union CityHigh school breaks ground for Student Sanctuary", Hudson Reporter, November 6, 2011. Accessed November 24, 2014.
  3. ^ a b c d Data for Union City High School, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed November 25, 2014.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Thorbourne, Ken (August 30, 2009). "Eagles ready to soar at new Union City High School". NJ.com. 
  5. ^ a b Schwartz, Art (September 1, 2013). "Back to school in Union City". The Union City Reporter. pp. 1 and 10.
  6. ^ a b c d e f g Hu, Winnie (September 11, 2009). "A Fine New Field Lifts Spirits". The New York Times.
  7. ^ a b c "HOK Partners with RSC Architects on Union City, N.J. School". Contract magazine, November 18, 2009. (subscription required)
  8. ^ Union City High School. Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools. Commission on Secondary Schools. Accessed June 22, 2011.
  9. ^ a b c d e f Pizarro, Max (October 3, 2009). "Stack honors McGreevey at new high school opening", PolitickerNJ. "'No one was a bigger advocate for Union City than Governor McGreevey and we should never forget that,' Stack told the massive crowd, mobilized for a Stack-led walk-through of the massive $200 million facility on John F. Kennedy Boulevard, the first high school built in Union City in 90 years."
  10. ^ a b Hu, Winnie (November 22, 2007). "After 88 Years of Rivalry, the Last as Us and Them". The New York Times. "But today’s so-called Turkey Game signals the end of the tradition. Next fall, the two schools will merge in a new $176 million building.... The new Union City High School takes up four-and-a-half acres in the center of the city, squeezed between row houses and commercial strips. It will have a football field and bleachers built on the roof so that players will no longer have to share the facilities at José Martí Middle School."
  11. ^ "REGISTERED SCHOOLS 2009 as of 11-16-2009". New Jersey Science League. Accessed June 3, 2013.
  12. ^ a b Diaz, Lana Rose (September 5, 2010). "School days are here again: UC students will return to class on Sept. 9". The Hudson Reporter. pp. 1 and 14. "Sanger said that the district has built upon its partnerships with nearby colleges and universities to provide more college level courses to high school juniors and seniors. 'They can move towards their high school diploma and garner college credits', said Sanger. 'So it is very possible for Union City High School students to leave with 12-15 college credits without any cost to them that are transferrable to many colleges in New Jersey.'"
  13. ^ Lewis, Ryan "UCHS Administration: Ryan Lewis". Union City High School. Accessed February 10, 2014.
  14. ^ a b Rosero, Jessica (December 14, 2004). "Farewell to historic stadium Union Hill, Emerson play final matchup at celebrated facility". The Hudson Reporter. "A tradition that has spanned eight decades, the annual Thanksgiving Day Game between Emerson High School and Union Hill High School has always been the culmination of the football season for Union City. This year's game, however, also marked a special place in the town's history, as it was the last Thanksgiving game to be played at the famed Roosevelt Stadium.... The WPA granted $172,472 for the stadium, and in 1936 employed 350 men to begin the construction. On Nov. 12, 1937, city, county and state officials gathered with about 11,000 people to dedicate the new stadium, which had been referred to as the 'Depression Baby.'"
  15. ^ Hague, Jim (December 7, 2004). "SCOREBOARD: The end of an era in Union City". The Hudson Reporter. "Over the years, it housed some great events, like an exhibition baseball game that featured a traveling bunch of vagabond ball players by the names of Babe Ruth and Lou Gehrig. Or the time a Cuban baseball team played a game of solidarity and goodwill, with appearances from legendary Hispanic performers like Tony Oliva, Minnie Minoso and Hall of Famer Orlando Cepeda. There were tractor pulls and car shows over the years, carnivals and concerts. There were ceremonies and graduations, political rallies and religious celebrations."
  16. ^ a b c d Lee, Evelyn (September 11, 2009). "Union City High School project nears completion". NJBiz.
  17. ^ Rosero, Jessica (March 21, 2006). "There's beer down here! Construction on high school unearths brewery foundation". The Hudson Reporter.
  18. ^ Rappaport, Melissa (August 30, 2009). "Back to School". The Union City Reporter. pp. 1 and 8.
  19. ^ a b Cullen, Deanna (May 8, 2011). "Seeds for Success: UCHS to graduate Ivy League-bound students". The Hudson Reporter. p. 1. "Much of the credit goes to the woman with, as Principal David Wilcomes puts it, “the formula" – science teacher and Project SEED mentor Nadia Makar."
  20. ^ Thorbourne, Ken (September 30, 2009). "Music stars to help celebrate new Union City High School". The Jersey Journal.
  21. ^ a b c Rappaport, Melissa (October 4, 2009). "A look inside" The Union City Reporter. pp, 1 and 18
  22. ^ Rappaport, Melissa (October 4, 2009). "Cucu can't sing at local event". The Hudson Reporter. pp, 1 and 19.
  23. ^ "Refresh your memory on local news". The Hudson Reporter Newspapers: 2009 Year in Review, p. 14.
  24. ^ Diaz, Lana Rose (June 27, 2010). "All for one" The Union City Reporter. p. 10
  25. ^ Diaz, Lana Rose (July 4, 2010). "Congrats, class of 2010!". The Hudson Reporter.
  26. ^ Diaz, Christian (June 9, 2013). "Learning outdoors, among waterfalls". The Hudson Reporter.
  27. ^ Hague, Jim (May 14, 2006). "Truant officer was Olympic hero Emerson High has gold medalist in midst". The Hudson Reporter. Retrieved 2012-03-18. 
  28. ^ Pope, Gennarose (March 18, 2012). "A truant officer…and an Olympian Two-time gold medalist inspires students to achieve". The Hudson Reporter. Retrieved 2012-03-18. 
  29. ^ "NJEA congratulates new county teachers of the year". New Jersey Education Association. July 3, 2012
  30. ^ Pope, Gennarose (September 30, 2012) "Educational excellence". The Union City Reporter. pp 1 and 4.
  31. ^ "Presenting the 2012 Hudson County Teacher of the Year Kristine Liguori-Nazzal". Hudson County TV. August 14, 2012. Accessed September 30, 2012.
  32. ^ Staff. "Top Schools Alphabetical List 2014", New Jersey Monthly, September 2, 2014. Accessed September 5, 2014.
  33. ^ "The Top New Jersey High Schools: Alphabetical". New Jersey Monthly. August 16, 2012.
  34. ^ "2010 Top High Schools". New Jersey Monthly. August 16, 2010.
  35. ^ a b Kirp, David L. (February 9, 2013). "The Secret to Fixing Bad Schools". The New York Times.
  36. ^ Kirp, David L. (2011). Kids First: Five Big Ideas for Transforming Children's Lives. (1st edition). Public Affairs, pp. 88, 90, 92, 111-112, 137, ISBN 158648947X
  37. ^ DeChiaro, Dean (March 31, 2013). "Tortoise beats hare". The Hudson Reporter.
  38. ^ Kirp, David L. (April 8, 2013). "How Union City Is Shifting the Arc of Immigrant Kids' Lives". The Nation.
  39. ^ E. Assata Wright (December 27, 2009). "The year in development". The Hudson Reporter Newspapers: 2009 Year in Review. p. 8
  40. ^ Diaz, Lana Rose (July 11, 2010). "Merwin Speaks". The Union City Reporter. pp. 1 and 9
  41. ^ "UC High School to hold book signing this Wednesday". The Union City Reporter. April 10, 2011, p. 2
  42. ^ a b Krider, Dave (October 18, 2012). "10 more high school football stadiums to see before you die". MaxPreps.
  43. ^ Hague, Jim (September 23, 2008). "Union City going through growing pains New program trying to meld teams of old". The Hudson Reporter.
  44. ^ a b Hague, Jim (September 20, 2009). "It's up on the roof for Union City". The Hudson Reporter.
  45. ^ Rappaport, Melissa (October 25, 2009). "Live! UC inaugurates performing arts center". The Union City Reporter. pp. 1 and 16
  46. ^ "Union City Performing Arts Center". Accessed February 9, 2014.
  47. ^ Arrue, Karina (May 18, 2010). "Union City Mayor Brian Stack and commissioners take their oaths of office" NJ.com/The Jersey Journal.
  48. ^ "UC International Film Festival to be held this weekend". The Union City Reporter. December 2, 2010, p. 4.
  49. ^ a b Diaz, Lana Rose (July 25, 2010). "Low-cost health care for kids: Community pediatric center based in high school building". The Hudson Reporter. pp. 1 and 9. "Earlier this month, the non-profit North Hudson Community Action Corporation (NHCAC) and the Union City Board of Education held a ribbon-cutting ceremony for NHCAC’s new pediatric health center located at Union City High School on Kennedy Blvd."
  50. ^ League Memberships – 2014-2015, New Jersey State Interscholastic Athletic Association. Accessed November 25, 2014.
  51. ^ 2014-2015 Public Schools Group Classification: ShopRite Cup–Basketball–Baseball–Softball for North I, New Jersey State Interscholastic Athletic Association, as of July 8, 2014. Accessed November 25, 2014.
  52. ^ New Jersey State Interscholastic Athletic Association League Memberships – 2009-2010, New Jersey State Interscholastic Athletic Association, backed up by the Internet Archive as of July 24, 2011. Accessed November 24, 2014.
  53. ^ a b Union City Soaring Eagles. GridIron New Jersey. Accessed September 6, 2010.
  54. ^ Hague, Jim "Valdez tabbed as Union City new grid coach; Former Ferris coach ends bizarre set of circumstances", Hudson Reporter, May 7, 2010. Accessed November 24, 2014.
  55. ^ "Union City High School Sports". NJ.com. Accessed February 10, 2014.
  56. ^ Bernstein, Jason (December 5, 2013). "Boys Soccer: North 1 Team roster for the SCANJ All-Star Game". NJ.com.
  57. ^ "Secaucus (2) at Union City (0), Hudson County Tournament, Final Round - Girls Volleyball". NJ.com/The Star-Ledger. October 30, 2013.
  58. ^ "Boys Bowling". Union City High School. Accessed February 10, 2014.
  59. ^ "Union City HS (Union City, NJ) - High School Sports". USA Today. Accessed February 10, 2014.
  60. ^ "Union City High School Sports Photos & Pictures". NJ.com. Accessed February 10, 2014.

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 40°46′13″N 74°02′11″W / 40.7703°N 74.0363°W / 40.7703; -74.0363